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Publication numberUS2501387 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 21, 1950
Filing dateOct 23, 1946
Priority dateOct 23, 1946
Publication numberUS 2501387 A, US 2501387A, US-A-2501387, US2501387 A, US2501387A
InventorsGeorge Haumann
Original AssigneeCoe Mfg Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Veneer lathe
US 2501387 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 21, 1950 K G. HAUMANN VENEER LATHE 4 Sheets-Sheet l 1 Filed Oct. 23. 1946 INVENTOR. 650265 flea/MANN G. HAUMANN March 21, 1950 VENEER LATHE 4 Sheets-Shget 3 Filed Oct. 23, 1946 VIII/l/I/I/I/ll'I/III I m k 6am: f/HUMHNN BY MM Jim nu Marh 21, 1950 HAUMANN 2,501,387

VENEER LAT E Filed 001;- 23. 1946 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Lay I 8 7 4M), M71, Ma

rmer/5Y5 Patented Mar. 21, 1950 UNITED. STATES PATENT OFFICE VENEER LATHE George Haumann, Portland, reg., assignor to The (Joe Manufacturing Company, Painesville, 0hio,'a corporation of Ohio Application October 23, 1946, Serial No. 705,045

2 Claims. (Oi. 144 209) The present invention relates to veneer lathes and, more particularly, to a veneer lathe comprising hydraulic means for holding the log to be cut.

One of the principal objects of the invention is the provision of a novel and improved veneer lathe having a plurality of rotatably supported spindles provided with chucks or dogs adapted to hold therebetween a log to be cut and pressure fluid actuated means for actuating the spindles to cause the chucks to engage and disengage a log and to maintain the same in tight engagement with the log during the cutting operation.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a novel and improved veneer lathe having chucks or dogs adapted to hold therebetween a log to be cut, which chucks are carried on the adjoining ends of aligned spindles rotatably supported in the machine, in combination with simple, reliable means for quickly moving the chucks into and out of engagement with the logs and for securely holding the chucks in engagement with the logs during the cutting operation, which means includes pressure fluid actuated motors of the reciprocable piston type in axial alignment with the spindles.

Another object of the invention is the provision of a novel and improved veneer lathe having chucks adapted to hold therebetween a log to be out, which chucks are carried on the adjoining ends of aligned spindles rotatably supported in the machine, in combination with pressure fluid actuated motors of the reciprocable piston type in axial alignment with the spindles for reciprocating the spindles, and anti-friction thrust means between the motors and the spindles, thus permitting free rotation of the spindles relative to the motors.

The invention resides in certain constructions and combinations and arrangements of parts and further objects and advantages r ll be apparent to those skilled in the art to which it relates from the following description of the preferred embodiment described with reference to the accompanying drawings forming a part of this specification in which similar reference characters designate corresponding parts, and in which Fig. l is a perspective rear view of a veneer lathe embodying the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary, longitudinal, sectional view, with portions in elevation, taken on a vertical central plane through the left-hand or dogging spindle of the lathe as viewed in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged view of portions of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view approximately on the line 4-4 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged vertical sectional view through the clamping means shown in Fig. 4;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view appf x 0n the line 66 of Fig. 5; and

Fig. 7 is a'diagrammatic view of the hydraulic system of the lathe with the spindles in the relative position which they occupy when the lathe is viewed from the front or operator's side.

The invention is herein illustrated and described as embodied in a more or less conventional veneer lathe and only those parts of the machine which are necessary to a complete understanding of the present invention are herein shown and described in detail. The parts of the machine not shown and described in detail per se form no part of the present invention and are known commercially in the art.

Referring to the drawings, the veneer lathe shown therein comprises a frame, designated generally by the reference character A, and including a rectangular base In provided with upstanding ends i I, I2. The frame A shown is of built-up construction and the upper parts l3, ll of the ends ll, l2 are separately formed and halted in position to facilitate manufacture and assembly of the lathe. A conventional knife I5, knife bar It, and pressure bar ll are located intermediate the end members H, 12 and movably or adjustably supported in the usual manner,

The log to be cut is adapted to be supported between chucks or dogs 20, 2| fixedly secured to adjacent ends of axially aligned spindles 22, 23 rotatably supported in the end members l3, M, respectively, and adapted to be moved lengthwise in a manner hereinafter specifically referred to, to engage and disengage the chucks with the opposite ends of the log. The log is rotated relative to the knife l5 upon rotation of the spindles. In the embodiment shown, the spindles 22, 23 are provided with steady rests or, outboard supports 24, 25, respectively, slidably supported on suitable ways 26, 21 formed on members 28, 29 fixed to the upper surface of the base Ill. The steady rests 24, 25 are adapted to be moved along their ways by pressure fluid actuated motors 30, 3! of the reciprocating piston type located in the ends I I, I2 and operatively connected to the outboard supports in a suitable manner.

The front ways 26 for the steady restsire generally V-shaped with the narrow part of the V pointing toward the front of the machine. The upper surface of the way is generally horizontal and the lower surface thereof is downwardly inclined rearwardly from the upper surface, as clearly shown in Fig. 4. The rear ways 21 are horizontal ways. The steady restsare adapted to be clamped to their respective ways by manually operable clamps, one for each of the rests. Each of the clamps comprises a movable, wedge-shaped member 32 slidably supported within the steady rest housing between the rear face of the horizontal way 21 and an operating member in the form of a gear wheel 33 connected to the lower end of a vertically extending shaft 3|. the upper end of which is provided with a hand lever 35 for facilitating rotation thereof. The gear 33 meshes with rack teeth on the rear side of the wedge member and, upon rotation of the handle 35 in one direction, moves the member 32 relative to the steady rest housing and the way 21 to wedge the member between the way 21 and the gear 33 and draw the steady rest housing tightly against the front V-shaped way 25.

The arrangement of the ways and clamps is such that when the steady rests are clamped to their respective ways, a predetermined dimension always exists between the front way 26 and a vertical center plane through the spindles; in other words, the steady rests are always clamped in a predetermined relative position with respect to the cutting knife, etc., and there is no possibility of so clamping the steady rests as to vary or change the distance between the knives, etc., and the axes of rotation of the work supporting spindles or work carried thereby. As will be readily apparent, there is considerable advantage in clamping the steady rests so that the axes of rotation of the spindles are in a predetermined location with respect to the knife, frame, etc., not only because this eliminates undue stress upon the spindle bearings but it permits the knife to be accurately located withrespect thereto by the use of appropriate means for indicating the position of the knife with respect to the frame and, in turn, the axes of rotation of the spindles.

The construction of both the dogging spindle 22 and the tail spindle 23 is; alike, as is the construction of the supporting and reciprocating mechanisms, and only the construction of the tail spindle 23, its supporting and operating mechanism will be described in detail, with the understanding that the dogging spindle 22 and its supporting and operating mechanisms are the same.

Referring particularly to Figs. 2 and 3, the spindle 23, the right-hand overhanging end of which is supported by the steady rest 25, is slidably supported intermediate its ends in a rotatable spindle sleeve or quill 40 by bearing members ll, 42 fixedly secured to opposite ends of the member 60 and having sleeve portions projecting into counterbored ends of the aperture in the spindle sleeve 41: through which the spindle 23 projects. The spindle 23 is keyed to the sleeve 40 by an elongated key 43 located in a slot or aperture in the sleeve 40, the radial inner end of which key projects into an elongated keyway M in the spindle. The radial outer end of the key 43 projects beyond the sleeve 40 and keys thereto a sprocket wheel 45, through the medium of which the spindle sleeve 40 and, in turn, the spindle 23 are rotated upon rotation of the sprocket wheel.

As shown, the sprocket wheel 45 is fixedly secured to the spindle sleeve 40 by being bolted to an external flange on the sleeve; however, any suitable means may be employed. The sprocket wheel is adapted to be selectively rotated from a suitable power source, not shown, but including a driving sprocket wheel located in the base and connected to the sprocket wheel 45 by a flexible chain-type drive 45. The spindel sleeve 40 hand ends of which are threaded into tapped apertures in the left-hand end of an annular boss 53 on the member I and within which boss the anti-friction bearing 41 is located. The opposite or left-hand ends of the rods 52 project through apertures in the member 50 and are provided with nuts 54 for fixedly securing the parts together and maintaining the same in assembled relationship. The spindle 23 is slldably supported in the member 50 by a bearing member 55, connected to the outer side of the member 50 and having a cylindrical portion surrounding the spindle 23 and projecting into a counterbore through which the spindle projects. The oppm site end of the aperture is counterbored and provided with suitable packing 56 to prevent the escape of pressure fluid around the spindle 23. The packing 56 is retained in position by a packing gland 51 connected to the opposite side of the member 50 and having a cylindrical portion extending into the counterbore. The right-hand end of the packing gland 5'! is counterbored and provided with a commercial oil seal 58.

As previously stated, the spindles 22, 23 are reciprocated axially to engage and disengage the chucks carried thereby with and from the work by pressure fluid operated motors of the reciprocating piston type located in alignment with the spindles. The pressure fiuid operated motors are designated generally by the reference characters- B, C, the motor B being associated with the spindle 22 and the motor C with the spindle 23. Both motors are alike and only the motor C associated with the spindle 23 is herein shown and described in detail.

The outer end of the spindle 23, see Fig. 3, is provided with a. piston head assembly, designated generally by the reference character D, reciprocable within a cylindrical sleeve or cylinder member 60 and forming therewith and with the member 50 and a cylinder head 6|, the double-acting pressure fluid actuated motor C of the reciprocating piston type, the piston rod of which is formed by the outer end of the spindle 23. The right-hand end of the cylinder 50, which is preferably formed of brass, projects into a counterbore in the left-hand side of the member 50 and the opposite end projects into a similar counterbore in the piston head 6| and the parts are fixedly held in assembled relationship by a plurality of rods 62, the right-hand ends of which are threaded into tapped apertures in the left-hand side of the member 50 and the opposite ends of i which project through openings in the piston head 6! where they are provided with nuts 63. The member 50 and cylinder head 6| are provided with radial conduits 64, for the admission and exhaust of pressure fluid to and from the cylinder at opposite sides of the piston assembly D. The conduit 54 communicates with an annular aperture 66 which in turn, is connected to the rlghthand end of the cylinder by a plurality of longitudinal apertures 61 opening into the lefthand side of the member 50 within cylinder 60.

The inner end of the aperture 60 communicates with a recess 83 formed in the right-hand side of the cylinder head The piston assembly D comprises a cup-shaped member I0, the open end of which faces toward the rightas viewed in Fig. 3. The member I0 is operatively connected to the outer end of the spindle 23 by a ring-like member II detachably bolted to the rim of the member I0, the radial inner part of which member II projects radially inwardly beyond the outer end of a disk-like member I2 keyed to a reduced portion I3 of the spindle 23 by a member 14, the radial inner end of which engages within an aperture in the portion II while the outer end thereof engages within an internal, longitudinally extending slot I5 in the member I2. The member 'II is held in assembled relationship with the end of the spindle 23 by a sleeve 16 threaded onto a portion of the spindle to the outside of the portion I3 and locked in position thereon by a setscrew II. An end thrust,

anti-friction bearing comprisin rollers I0 interposed between annular race plates 80, 8| adapted to abut the bottom of the recess in the cup-shaped member I0 and the left-hand side of the member 12, respectively, permits free rotation of the spindle 23 relative to the piston assembly D while pressure is applied to the outer or left-hand end of the piston assembly by the admission of pressure fluid to the outer end of the cylinder through the conduit 65. The piston assembly D comprises suitable packing rings 32, 03 located in grooves formed in the circumference of the member I0 partly by th radial outer portion of the member II and a ring 84 located in a recess in and bolted to the left-hand end of the member I0. As an alternative construction, the piston head D could be flxedly connected to the end of the spindle 23 and the spindle 23 made in two sections connected by a suitable thrust coupling whlchwould permit free rotation between the sections. A coupling of the type referred to could be located within the cylindrical sleeve SI which could be elongated, if necessary.

As shown, the extreme outer end 85 of the spindle 23 is rotatably supported in the piston head assembly D by an anti-friction bearing 86 of conventional construction located in a central bore 01 in the'bottom of the cup-shaped member I0. Preferably the diameter of the bore 81 is slightly greater than the outside diameter of the outer race of the bearing 06, thus permitting a slight radial movement of the outer end of the spindle 23 relative to, the piston assembly D but providing a support for the outer or overhanging end of the spindle in the event the radial movement thereof exceeds a predetermined small amount. It will also be observed that in the embodiment shown, the thickness of the thrust bearing, including the race plates 80, 8| and the member I2, is slightly less than the distance between the left-hand face of the member 1| and the bottom of the aperture in the member I0 within which the thrust bearing is located, thus permitting a slight axial movement of the spindle 23 relative to the piston head assembly D. This clearance, together with the clearance referred to between the outer race of the bearing 86 and the member I0, prevents the spindle 23 from binding within the piston head assembly D which would tend to rotate the piston head assembly with thespindle.

Pressure fluid, preferably oil, is selectively supplied to opposite sides of the piston heads of the dogging and tail spindles B, C, respectively,

from a hydraulic pump 00 of commercial construction and preferably of the constant pressure, variable volume type, which pump is merely shown diagrammatically in Fig. 7. The pump is connected to and driven by an electric motor 00, which also drives a similar pumpBI, hereinafter referred to. The inlet or suction side of the pump 89 is connected to an oil reservoir or sump 02 through a conduit 93 having a filter 04 located therein. The inlet or suction side of the pump 9| is connected to the sump 92 in a similar manner by a conduit 95 having a filter 96 therein.

The discharge or pressure side of the pump 89 is connected by a conduit 91 including a check valve 90, to two control valves, designated generally by the reference characters E, F, which valves are also connected to the sump 92 by a return conduit I00.

The valves E and F are manually operated and control the flow of pressure fluid to and from the dogging and tail spindle motors, designated generally as B, C, through the medium of conduit means I02, I03 and I04, I05 interposed between the control valves E, F and the motors B, C, respectively. As shown, the conduit I02 connects the left-hand side of the valve E with the corresponding end of the motor B, the conduit I03 connects the right-hand side of the valve E with the right-hand endof the motor B, the conduit I04 connects the right-hand side of the valve F with the left-hand end of the motor C, and the conduit I05 connects the left-hand side of the valve F with the right-hand end of the motor C. 'The valves E and F may be of commercial construction.

The valve F which controls the flow of pressure fluid to and from the motor C which moves the tail spindle, is a conventional, three-position, four-way valve. The valve E is a fourposition valve and when moved into the fourth position, designated Dog on Fig.7, it not only closes the valve end of the conduit I02 but connects a conduit IIO to the conduit 91 to supply pressure fluid to abooster II2, which booster is, in turn, connected to the conduit I02 by a conduit II3 having a relief valve H4 set at some relatively high pressure; for example, 750 pounds to a square inch. The booster II2 and the relief valve H4 may be of commercial construction; for example, the booster may be the booster shown in United States Patent No. 2,296,647.

When the booster II2 is connected in the circuit by proper manipulation of the control valve E, the pressure of the fluid supplied to the booster, which ma be 200 to 250 pounds or less. is boosted to 600 or 700 pounds and supplied at this pressure to the outer end of the motor B of the dogging spindle to force the dog or chuck 20 carried thereby tightly against the log so that the log will be securely held between thechucks or dogs during the turning operation.

In order to permit the application of extremely high pressure to the dogging spindle motor B, the conduit I05 connected to the outer end of the tail spindle motor C includes a pilot-operated check valve I I5, the control chamber I I6 of which is operatively connected to the conduit I04 by a branch conduit Ill. The pilot-operated check valve may be of any commercial construction and is not herein described in detail. Suffice it to say that the check valve shown comprises a gravity-operated, normally closed valve member IIO, which permits free flow of pressure fluid through the conduit I05 from the control valve 7 F to the outer end of the motor C, but prevents the flow of fluid in the opposite direction until the valve member H8 is raised from its seat by the application of pressure fluid by way of the branch conduit II! to the underside of a piston I20 slidably supported in the chamber II6, previously referred to, and operatively connected to the valve II8 by a slidable plunger or rod IN. The construction is such that the pilot valve 5 does not interfere with the normal operation of the tail spindle motor C, but prevents movement of the tail spindle toward the right, as viewed in Fig. 7, by the motor B when a higher pressure is applied to the motor B than that applied to the motor C.

As previously mentioned, the outboard supports 24 and 25 are adapted to be moved along the guide members 28, 29 on the upper surface of the base It by a double-acting, pressure fluid operated motor housing within the end members II, I2 of the frame A. Both of these motors are diagrammatically shown in Fig. '7 where they are designated generally by the reference characters 30, 3|. Pressure fluid for actuating these motors is supplied by the pump SI and controlled by four-way manually operated valves G, H similar to the valve F previously referred to.

The valves G and H are connected to the pump ll by conduit means I24 and to the motors 30 and 3| by conduit means I25, I26 and I21, I28, respectively. If desired, the conduits 91 and I24 may be interconnected by a conduit I30, preferably having a check valve I3I which prevents the flow of pressure fluid from the conduit 81 to the conduit I24. This construction provides an adequate supply of pressure fluid for effecting rapid movement of the motors B, C and permits the use of a pump 89 of less capacity than would otherwise be required for moving the dogging and tail spindles at the same speed.

The booster, check valve, and pump system shown not only reduce the size of the pumps required to move the spindles at a given speed into and out of engagement with a log but does not require the application of high pressure to the spindles until after the chucks are engaged with the log. If high pressure were to be employed throughout the entire chucking operation, it would be dangerous to the men blocking the logs and there would be a possibility of the chucks hitting the log with sufficient force to damage the lathe and/ or split the log. With the present construction, the chucks can be moved into engagement with a log at a fairly rapid rate but without excessive force and thereafter high pressure can be applied to cause the chucks to securely hold the log. The high pressure is applied' throughout the cutting operation and maintains the chucks in engagement with the log. This prevents the chucks from becoming loose and boring into the log, as is often the case with the prior art lathes wherein pressure is not maintained upon the chucks during the cutting operation but the operator is depended upon to tighten the chucks when he observes them becoming loose in the log. 4

The control or distribution valves E to H, booster I I2, and relief valve I II, are all connected to the return conduit I00, as is clearly shown in Fig. 7.

The valves E to H, inclusive, are not shown on Figs. 1 to 4 of the drawings but may be located at any convenient place about the lathe, as will be readily understood by those skilled in the art to which the invention relates. In the particular till lathe shown, the operator's station is adjacent to the rear right-hand comer, as viewed in Fig. l, which figure, as previously stated, is a rear view and the control valves are located at the control station.

It is believed that the operation of this lathe will be readily apparent from the foregoing description thereof. Suflice it to say that the dogging and tail spindles 22, 23 may be readily and quickly moved to any desired position by manual manipulation of the control or distribution valves E, F and while dogged the log is securely held by the application of high pressure to the dogging spindle motor B. With the present machine, the time required to change logs is e/minimum because of the rapid movement that can be imparted to the spindles. The outboard supports 24, 25 can be properly positioned without loss of excessive time by manipulation of the control or distribution valves G, H. The fact that the pressure fluid motors which reciprocate the dogging and tail spindles are connected to the spindles by means which permit free relative rotation therebetween allows the chucks or dogs to be forced by the motors into tight engagement with a log without interfering with its rotation. During operation, the piston heads remain stationary or substantially so and do not wear the walls of the cylinder. If the cylinder walls were permitted to wear, it would be diflicult to maintain the high pressure required for securely holding the logs.

It will be apparent from the foregoing description of the preferred embodiment of the invention that the objects heretofore enumerated and others have been accomplished and that a new and improved veneer lathe has been provided which utilizes pressure fluid for manipulation of the tail and dogging spindles. While the lathe shown has been described in considerable detail, the invention is not limited to the particular construction referred to, which may be varied without departing from the invention, and it is my intention to cover hereby all adaptations,

-' modifications and uses thereof which come within the practice of those skilled in the art to which the invention relates and within the scope of the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A veneer lathe comprising a frame, spaced axially aligned quills rotatably supported in said frame, dogging and tail spindles slidably keyed within said quills, means for rotating said quills, pressure fluid operated motors of the reciprocating piston type located in axial alignment with said spindles for reciprocating said spindles toward and from each other, each of said motors comprising a piston rotatably connected to and enclosing the outer ends of said spindles, conduits for supplying fluid pressure to said motors on either sides of the pistons therein, means for controlling the flow of pressure fluid to one of said motors comprising a three position distribution valve, a fluid pressure operated check valve in 7 the conduit connected to the outer end of the said one motor permitting application of fluid pressure to the outer end of said one motor but normally preventing release of fluid pressure therefrom, a conduit for supplying fluid pressure to the operating mechanism of said check valve connected to the conduit leading to the opposite end of said one motor so that application of fluid pressure to the last-mentioned conduit operates said check valve to release fluid pressure from the outer end of said one motor, a four position valve for controlling the flow of pressure fluid to and from the other of said motors, and a booster adapted to be operatively connected to the conduit leading to the outer end of said other motor when said four position valve is moved to one of its positions, whereby the said check valve retains the fluid pressure in the outer end of said one motor against the force exerted thereon throughout a workpiece positioned between the spindles when the said booster is operatively connected to said other motor, the said check valve releasing the fluid pressure from the outer end of said one motor when the said three and four position valves are positioned for effecting movement of said spindles away from each other.

2. In a veneer lathe, a frame, axially aligned spindles rotatably supported in said frame, way means on said frame having oppositely facing sides one of which is inclined inwardly, steady rests for the projecting ends of said spindles, each of said steady rests comprising a housing slidably supported for movement longitudinally of the axes of rotation of said spindles, each of said housings having portions cooperating with said way" means with one of said portions having a,

shape complementary to the said inclined side of 10 said way means, and means interposed between said housings and the other of said sides of said way means for clamping said housings in engagement with said way means and with the said inclined side of the latter in gripping engagement with the said complementary shaped portions of said housings, whereby the axes of said spindles are located in predetermined position with re-. spect to said frame upon said rests being clamped to said way means.

GEORGEHAUMANN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent: 9

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,299,883 Warren Apr. 8, 1919 1,700,668 Damerall Jan. 29, 1929 1,776,662 Merritt Sept. 23, 1930 1,857,986 Turcott May 10, 1932 2,042,123 Pierle May 26, 1936 2,049,444 Hirvonan Aug. 4, 1936 2,214,390 Wahlmark Sept. 10, 1940 2,340,532 Jackson Feb. 1, 1944

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2645253 *Jun 8, 1948Jul 14, 1953Edward WilsonLog shaping machine
US2645871 *Apr 6, 1950Jul 21, 1953Nat Publishing CompanyMachine for decorating sheet edges
US2754641 *Feb 1, 1954Jul 17, 1956Bryant Grinder CorpWork holding and clamping mechanism for centerless grinding machines
US2768499 *Apr 20, 1953Oct 30, 1956John S PilchHydraulic system comprising multiple pump and ram units
US2828783 *Jul 30, 1956Apr 1, 1958Vulcan CorpCopying lathe
US2869596 *Oct 18, 1956Jan 20, 1959Jackson Ind IncVeneer lathe
US3132673 *Jun 22, 1959May 12, 1964Premier Gear And Machine WorksDouble chuck for a veneer lathe
US3198226 *Jun 5, 1961Aug 3, 1965Coe Mfg CoHydraulic veneer lathe
US4396049 *Feb 5, 1981Aug 2, 1983Calvert Manufacturing, Inc.Backup roll arrangement for wood veneer lathe
US5067534 *Apr 10, 1989Nov 26, 1991Raute OySpindle drive for a veneer lathe
WO1989012535A1 *Apr 10, 1989Dec 28, 1989Raute OySpindle drive for a veneer lathe
Classifications
U.S. Classification144/209.1, 91/519, 91/420, 82/148, 91/32, 91/530
International ClassificationB27L5/02, B27L5/00
Cooperative ClassificationB27L5/02
European ClassificationB27L5/02