Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2502610 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1950
Filing dateDec 27, 1943
Priority dateDec 27, 1943
Publication numberUS 2502610 A, US 2502610A, US-A-2502610, US2502610 A, US2502610A
InventorsWegman Evert S
Original AssigneeWestinghouse Electric Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for cooling and dispensing beverages
US 2502610 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 4, 1950 E. s. WEGMAN 2,502,610

APPARATUS FOR COOLING AND DISPENSING BEVERAGES Filed Dec. 2'7, 1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 2 11a 40 24, ull h M H 5; 16- 5 1 Q 30 A \Q U M U a 5 INVENTOR WITNESSES:

BY W ATTORN Y April 4, 1950 E. s. WEGMAN 2,502,610

APPARATUS FOR COOLING AND DISPENSING BEVERAGES Filed Dec. 27, '1943 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 24 H [WF'MS I; M to ue-- 2 M 66 85 F'l :.3. 4 52 I H7\ 52 &% 4,3

l I =2 5! 7- 28 Q J 4t 3 45 4-6 L E? i I 49 ATTORN EY Patented Apr. 4, 1 950 UNITED ST TES PTENT OFFICE APPARATUS FOR COOLING AND DISPENS- ING BEVERAGES sylvania Application December 27, 1943, Serial No. 515,661-

This invention relates to beverage dispensing apparatus and particularly to that type of dispensing apparatus in which a mixed beverage comp-rising syrup and water components is dispensed into a cup or other receptacle.

More specifically, the invention relates to a mixed beverage dispensing apparatus in which the syrup and water components are. stored separately and maintained in a refrigerated condition until a few seconds before the dispensing mechanism is actuated, manually or by a coin, whereupon predetermined amounts of the components are mixed and. dispensed or are dispensed separately and mixed in the receptacle.

In an apparatus of this character it is highly desirable, indeed almost essential. for the production of a satisfactory drink, that the syrup and water components be maintained at a selected low temperature, usually about 40 F.', and delivered. at that temperature to a receptacle, usually an expendable paper cup.

Some of the factors requiring this condition are (I) the maintenance of proper carbonation in the dispensed drink, ('2) the-assurance of the delivery of the exact amount; of syrup, this being among other things a function of the viscosity and consequently affected by temperature, and (3') the susceptibility of some syrups particularly those with a sugar base to fermentation and. moldgrowth when exposed for a substantial time to the air at IOOHI temperature.

In the interests of simplicity and serviceability it is also desirable that the cooling unit of the 'mechanical refrigerating system usually associated with such a dispensing apparatus be 1 made as a single. compact unit rather" than an elaborate" coil system winding its way into contact with the Water receptacle, the carbonator, the syrup tank or tanks, the dispensing valve and the syrup" metering devices. Nevertheless, the cooling unit and the entire cooling arrangemerit must be such that all of those parts are adequately cooled.

A multiple drink. dispenser, that is, a dispenser from which any" one of several flavors'm'ay be selected by the consumer, offers further problems with respect to the cooling of the" associated parts because of the' necessity of disposing some of the syrup tanks aconsiderable distance from the dispensing nozzle.

Among the objects of this invention are the provision of an arrangement of the parts of a dispensing a paratus to provide adequat'eand uniform cooling of the water to: be: dispensed, the carbonator; one or more syrup tanks, the dis 4 Claims. (Cl. 225-21) pensing valve or nozzle, the syrup metering devices and the conduits leading from the metering device to the nozzle.

A more specific object is to accomplish the objects of the preceding paragraph by cooling the water to be dispensed by means of a refrigerant' heat-absorbing unit disposed in a tank containing the water, immersing the carbonator and syrup tank or tanks in the water to be cooled thereby, and disposing the normally fluidcontaining parts of the syrup metering device, herein described as a pump and a valve for each syrup tank, within one of the aforesaid tanks so as to be cooled by the liquid therein.

Specifically, it is an object of the invention to cool the syrup-containing portions of the syrup metering devices by so arranging the syrup dispensing system that the normally syrup-containing portions of these devices are disposed within the syrup tank. itself so asto be cooled by the contents thereof. By normally-syrup-containing portions is meant those portions of the metering devices which are static or at rest when the apparatus is not dispensing a beverage.

Another object of the invention is to provide the syrup tank with a baffle means so constructed and arranged as to ensure a quantity of cold syrup being in contact with the syrup metering devices at all times.

These and other objects are effected by the invention as will be apparent from the following description and claims taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, forming a part of this application, in which:

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic representation of a dispensing apparatus embodying my invention;

Fig. 2' is a vertical elevation partly in section, showing a single syrup tank and the metering device therefor, the carbonator and the dispensing'nozzle; and

Fig. 3 is a full scale vertical section through a single syrup metering device and carbonated water dispensing nozzle.

A receptacle m is provided for containing a body of water to be refrigerated, carbonated and dispensed. The water may be supplied by any suitable means, here indicated as a conduit H, through which the entry of water is controlled by a float-operated valve l2. A conduit l3 leads from the valve l2 to discharge water in the vicinity of a refrigerant heat-absorbing unit [4. This unit is here shown as a conventional expansion coil operatively connected by a suction conduit t5 and a capillary tube l6 to a motordriven refrigerant condensing unit [1.

The refrigerating system per se forms no part of the present invention and need not be described in detail as many types of these units are available. For the .purpose herein used, it should have adequate capacity to maintain the temperature of the water bath between selected limits, and be controlled by a suitable device responsive to the water temperature. The present practice is to maintain the water temperature between 36 F. and 40 F. in order to produce a palatable beverage in the cup. A motordriven agitator I8 is provided adjacent the cooling unit I4 to distribute the cooled water and thus assist in maintaining a uniform temperature throughout the Water bath and the parts of the apparatus immersed in it.

A suitable carbonator I9 is located in receptacle and is uniformly cooled by the water in the tank. The carbonator receives carbon dioxide gas under controlled pressure from a cylinder through a conduit 24. Water is supplied to the carbonator from the .cooled supply in tank I6, by means of a pump 22 and conduit 23. The carbonator I prefer to use is fully described in the copending application of Andrew J. Nicholas, serial No. 501,947, filed September 11, 1943, now abandoned, and assigned to Westinghouse Electric 8: Manufacturing Company. The operation of pump 22 is controlled in response to the water level in the carbonator by any of several known devices (not shown).

Syrup tanks 24 are also disposed in the water receptacle. These may be any desired number, here shown as two, and may contain the same or different syrups. The tanks have necks 25 projecting through the cover 26 of receptacle Ill, and through which they are filled. Removable caps 21 are provided for the necks.

The beverage dispensing mechanism here shown comprises a carbonated water nozzle 28 leading from the carbonator to the cup 23, and, for each syrup tank, a pump 30 and a flow control valve 31 for directing the flow of syrup from the tank 24 to the pump 30 and from the pump 30 to the syrup outlet 32, from whence it flows to the cup simultaneously with the carbonated water from nozzle 28. 33 indicates a solenoid which, when energized, operates, through pivoted lever 34, a valve 35 in the dispensing nozzle to allow the cold carbonated water to flow into the cup.

The carbonated water-dispensing nozzle and the syrup metering and dispensing system for a single tank are shown in detail in Fig. 3. The apparatus herein disclosed requires only a single carbonated water nozzle, but a separate syrup metering and dispensing system is required for each syrup tank supplied.

The carbonator I 9 and the water nozzle 28 leading therefrom are shown at the left side of Fig. 3. The lower end of the carbonator is provided with an opening 36 which leads into an opening 31 provided in a hollow plug 38. This plug is [preferably metallically bonded to the carbonator wall to form a fiuidtight joint. The lower end of the plug 38 is externally threaded, as at 39. The plug extends through the bottom wall of the water tank 16, and the nut 40, when screwed tight on the external threads 39, serves to clamp the plug 38 and consequently the carbonator l 5 to the bottom wall of the tank 10.

The dispensing valve and nozzle proper comprise an externally and internally tapered body 4| which, at its upper end, is internally threaded,

as at 42, for engagement with the lower threads 39 on plug 38. A plate 43 provided with a central orifice 44 is threaded into the upper part of valve body 41. The under side of this plate around the orifice 44 serves as a seat for the valve 35. This valve is attached to a vertically recilprocable stem 45, which passes throu h a comically-shaped core 46 and terminates in screw-threaded engagement with a nut 41. Webs 48 connect the nut with a sleeve 49, the upper portion of which is mounted in sliding engagement with the lower end of valve body 4!. A spring 50, located in a recess 5| in the upper portion of core 46, surrounds the upper part of valve stem and bears against the under side of the valve 35. This spring should be sufiiciently strong to maintain the valve seated against the pressure prevailing in the carbonator.

In the embodiment shown, the valve is unseated by the lever 34 which moves the sleeve and valve stem downwardly in response to the energization of solenoid 33. Thus water will flow from the carbonator I9 through the orifice 44 as long as the solenoid 33 is energized. A screen filter 51a provided with a ported support 52 may be disposed between the carbonator l9 and the orifice 44.

The cold carbonated water, after passing the orifice 44, passes through ports 53 provided in the upper end of core 46 and then into a chamber 54 disposed between the core 46 and the valve body 4|. Here the water follows two paths, one through a flow-restrictive device 55 disposed between the core 46 and the valve body 41 to the cup or other receptacle, and the other through a fitting 5t and a conduit 51 to the several syrup pumps 30, one of which is shown in Fig. 3.

The syrup metering system and the water flow control device herein described form no part of the present invention, but are fully described and claimed in the copending application of Bruce G. Copping for Automatic valve for dispensing and proportioning syrups and carbonated water, Serial No. 480,108, filed March 22, 1943, now Patent 2,495,210, January 24, 1950. The flow control device 55, here shown, comprises a group of nested cones of predetermined length, spaced apart at calculated intervals to permit the flow of water from the carbonator under known pressure to the cup at atmospheric pressure without an excessive loss of carbon dioxide. The design of such a fiow control device and the calculations therefor are fully disclosed in the aforesaid Copping application.

' The syrup dispensing system herein described is so designed that the volume of syrup dispensed is always in direct proportion to the amount of water dispensed, thus ensuring uniformity of each drink. The main elements of each syrup dispensing unit, one of which is provided for each syrup to be dispensed, comprise a valve mechanism 3|, a pump 30 and a syrup conduit 32. The valve mechanism controls the fiow of cold syrup from its tank 24 to the pump 30 and from the pump to the conduit 32. This conduit terminates adjacent the water nozzle 28, and discharges the syrup directly into the cup simultaneously with the water so that the ultimate mixing of the two occurs in the cup itself.

The syrup valve mechanism 3|, here shown, comprises a body provided with an upper cap GI and a lower cap 62. The upper cap is provided with a port 63 communicating with the interior of the syrup tank 24 and also with a port 64 communciating with a conduit 65, which conasoaaio emit-isattached byaooupling'BEtathe upperend of the syrup pump 30. The-valve body. 6911s pro. videdwitlr avalve seat iii past-which syrup may flow at selected. times ta the chamber Ewand then. through a port 69 and coupling .tosthe. syrup conduit Thefiowof. syrup. through. the. ports 63., 6A. and; this. controlled by: a :doublevalve com-. prisingvan; upper member rt andzalowen member: 1-2,. bQthi of which are. moved simultaneously by a. reciprocablestem ltattached to the movable core. Moi asolenoid 1.5. Inthe position shown in Fig-r. 3, the: solenoid; is .deenergized; so. that the lower valve member 12 is seated onvalveseat 61 and the upper valve member ht: is. withdrawn from the port 63,. allowing free. communication between. the tank 2.4; and; he pump. to throu h ports; 6.3. 64, and conduit 65... This is: the;normal position of these partswhenthe system. is, static that is; when a drink is not being dispensed, The; weight of the valve-members... their stem. andthew solenoid core tend. to. maintain them in thisposition. A spring 16. may be provided, around .th,e valve stem, 13 toassist in moving the. stem. down:- wardly, A flexible sealing member TI is provided, between the valve stem; 73: inside the. chamber 68 and the valve body to prevent leakage around, the. valve stem. This member is sealed to the valve stem by known means and may co.nvenieini-.-v 1y be clamped at. its lower flared end between. the body and lower valve, cap 52.

vided at any joint in the entire systemiherein described, as. is well known to those skilled in the art.

The syrup pumpingmechanism; 3d comprises two distinct parts. one the. pumpingportion per se, shown generally at 18. inFig, 3 and disposed! infthecoldsyrupin tank 24 and. the, other the. metering deviceindicated. generally at 19 in Fig, 3 and disposed outside the. syrup tank.

The pumping mechanism 18. comprises a flex.-, ible cup-shaped diaphragm 86, here shown ashavinga frusto-conical. shape, and which may. be convenientlymolded from any suitable natural rubber or. synthetic rubben The upper or, openv end oithe diaphragm is firmly clamped between. theupper edgeofarigid cup 8.i.,'preferably made. of" stainless steel, and a cap 82 of. the same material disposed in screw-threaded. engagement. with a ring .83 bonded to the upper edge. of. cup 81'; The fitting 6.5) is bondedlto the cup. 8.2,. as--in-.

} dicated attd, and is provided with a port. 85;.

which affords constantly open. communciation between the interior of diaphragm fill. and. the. conduit'fi'li. A light spring 86' may be. provided, to return diaphragm 8.0'to its extended. position. The lower horizontal portion of the diaphragm. is clamped between two metal plates 81;88. by the bolt: and nut assembly 89.;

The bolt of assembly 89 extends in screw-- threaded engagement with the upper end of a relciprocable-stem 9H3 so that movement of thisstem imparts motion to the flexible diaphragm 80. This stem 96 has a smooth sliding fit inside a, bore provided in the upper end of a body 9 I. The rigid cup 8!; is clamped to the upper end ofabody. 9i" by a nut' 92.

Body It] has an enlarged internally threaded. cup-shapeclmember 93. formed at its. lower end. An elongated hollow cap 9.4 has: an externally threaded flange provided on. its upperor open end for engagement with thethreads on member 93; A pair of flexible. ce11's96, 91. are disposed one above. and. one below. aseparator plate 88, flanges formedat' the free ends. of. these cells. being.

6. clamped, together with. the edge. of plate 98., be. v tween the flange 95. of. cap: 94; and; the horizontal -wall 99 of member 9.3;

v sui ab e I gaskets, not specifically enumerated, may be DIO- Centrally ofv the separator plate 98 there is provided a boss I00 having. a. tapered orifice lll'H at one end and a screw-threaded. recess M2: at the other end for receiving. an adjustable plug 103. This plug has a tapered end. I04. cooperating withthe orifice ml. to provide an adjustable res striction l in controlling the flow: of. fluid; between the cells 96, 91 through theplate 98, adjustment being. provided by the screw-threaded: portion I05 of plug :03, which cooperates with. the screwthreaded recess H32 in. boss 4.00. and is manipulated by the head. I06 on the plug; I03. A, port 101 extends. axially of the plug I03. and communicates through branchports. I08 with the restriction H0. I

In order to ensure quick return of the fluid from cell 96 to cell. 91 at the. end of thepumping stroke, the p1ate=98 is provided with a ported plug H l through which the flow of fluidis. permitted in one direction; only (downwardly in. Fig. 3) by a rubber checkvalve; I I2, commonly known as a Thompson valve. The. carbonated water conduit 57 is connected tQthe cap 94 by a plug H3 and is provided with. an axial port [1! i-v and radial ports H5 through which the carbonated water flows from conduit 51' to the outside. of cell 91. The cells 96, 91. are'filled with a suit,- able fluid, and for the: purpose; described this may be distilled uncarbonated water. The cells themselves are preferably'molded withqthin walls from natural or syntheticrubber.

Considering the; operation of; the apparatus when viewed as anautomatic mixed. beverage dispenser, let it. be assumed that the parts are in the positions shown in, the. drawings and that. the carbonator and syrup tanks and. their contents are all cooled to dispensing temperatureofbetween 36 F. and40 F; It should be-particularly noted that the syrup-containing portions of valve 3|. and pump; 30 are, immersed in the cold syrup in tank 24 which is in, turn immersed in the refrigerated water in receptacle iii... A balile H8 may be disposed in the; lower part of each syrup tank around the immersed. parts of the syrup valve and pump, this. bafiie being pro.- vided with ports or openings It! at; its lower. end for the passage of syrup. Likewise each bafile should-be provided with a vent tube M8 ex.- tending from the top wall of the baffle to the space above the normal. syrup level in tank. 24; This tube serves to release air which. may become entrapped under the bafilewhen syrup. is supplied to the tank 24. The purposes of the baifie H6 are (1) to. prevent mixing of freshly added syrup with that which has. already been cooled to dispensing temperature, or in other words, to provide for the continuous presence of a body of. syrup already cooledand (2) to maintain this cold body of. syrup around the immersed portions of. the syrup pump. and valve, as it is the syrup in those portions which is ini. tially dispensed fromxtheapparatus when a. coin is. inserted or the device is otherwise actuated.

It will likewise be noted (Fig. 2) thatthe external water receptacle I0. is insulated completely as. indicated; inpart at 9,; and that in sulation s p idedin the form, o-f a. channel. in).

around; the depending; parts of; the syrup pump. and; valvenot otherwise disposed in. the. syrup tank, and further that the major. part: of; the syrup conduits 32; and: water; conduit. 51- pass through this. insulated channel. where. they. are

I? uniformly cooled by being'in proximity to the uninsulated portions of the syrup tanks and water receptacle immediately above the channel.

To revert to the mechanical operation, the various electrical circuits not being shown, the flexible diaphragm 80, conduit 66 and the portion of syrup valve 3i above the valve seat 12 are filled with cold syrup. A coin being insorted and a cup having been thereupon deposited below the nozzle 28,'one of the solenoids I is energize-(Les determined by the flavor selection made, and its core is is drawn upwardly, seating valve member ll against port 63 and mov-- ing valve member "l2 away from seat 57.

Solenoid 33 is likewise energized and through lever 3 and sleeve 49 unseats valve 35. Carbonated water under pressure then flows through orifice 44 and ports 53 to chamber 54 from where 'most of it flows through restrictor 55 to the cup. .A small amount, however, passes through fitting 56 and conduit 51 to the interior of the caps 94 of each syrup pump. The pressure of the carbonated water on the exterior of each flexible cell 91 forces water from that cell through the ports I 01, I88 and orifice Ill) to the interior of cell96, causing that cell to expand and push the flexible diaphragm 8G upwardly, thus forcing the contained syrup in the diaphragm out through conduit 65. If the solenoid 75 has been energized, as previously explained, the syrup will pass from conduit 65 through port 64 and past seat 61 to chamber 58, and through port 69 and coupling l!) to conduit 32 and the beverage cup. This syrup flow is maintained as long as the Valve 35 is unseated in response to the energization of solenoid 33, the result being that the syrup and water are dispensed in selected proportions. If several syrup tanks and their attendant valves and pumps are provided, syrup will flow to the cup only from that tank whose valve solenoid has been energized, for although all the pumps are actuated when the carbonated water flows to the cup, unless the attendant valve solenoid is energized the syrup will flow from the pump chamber back through conduit 65, port 6d and orifice 63 to the tank 24.

A suitable timing mechanism deenergizes the electrical circuits to the various solenoids and stops the liquid flow to the beverage cup. The

return stroke of the pump occurs when the pres:

sure on cell ill is relieved by the closing of valve through spring 59. At the same time, the solenoid '65 being deenergized, valve member 72 seats and member "H unseat-s so that syrup is drawn from tank 24 through orifice 53, port 64 and conduit 65 into the pump in readiness for the next dispensing operation. The return of water from cell 96 to cell 9'! is accelerated by the provision of the check valve i :2.

The objects of the invention and preferred means of attaining them have been fully stated in this specification and it is believed that the objects of obtaining a uniform temperature of the dispensed liquids by a compact, accessible arrangement of uniformly cooled parts has been adequately obtained in a simple, direct manner by the apparatus herein described.

The terms dispensing valve, dispensing nozzle and dispensing valve mechanism as used herein are not to be construed as meaning only a single outlet, but rather as including a composite device discharging a plurality of beverage components into a single cup or receptacle simultaneously or consecutively, so as to produce a mixed beverage in the cup. The terms dispensing valve,

dispensing nozzle and dispensing valve mecha-i nism are also to be construed asmeaning a device which discharges either a single liquid, a mixed liquid or a plurality of liquids into a cup or receptacle.

While the invention has been shown in but one form, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that it is not so limited, but is susceptible of various changes and modifications without departing from the spirit thereof, and it is desired,

therefore, that only such limitations shall be placed thereupon as are specifically set forth in the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. In apparatus for dispensing a cold mixed drink through a dispensing nozzle and for maintaining the component parts of the drink in a cold uniformly refrigerated condition prior to the dispensing operation, the combination of a receptacle for the water component of a beverage, a tank disposed in the water receptacle for storing syrup, refrigerant heat-absorbing means disposed in the receptacle for cooling the water therein and through the cooled water cooling the syrup tank and its contents, a syrup pump, valve means for controlling the flow of cooled syrup from the tank to the pump and from the pump to a dispensing nozzle, those portions of the valve means and pump which, when in their static position, contain syrup being disposed withinthe confines of the syrup tank so as to be constantly immersed in and cooled by the contents thereof.

2. In apparatus for dispensing a cold mixed drink through a dispensing nozzle and for maintaining the component parts of the drink in a cold uniformly refrigerated condition prior to the dispensing operation, the combination of a receptacle for the water component of a beverage, a tank disposed in the water receptacle for storing syrup, refrigerant heat-absorbing means disposed in the receptacle for cooling the water therein and through the cooled water cooling the syrup tank and its contents, syrup metering means associated with the syrup tank, said metering means having its syrup containing portion disposed in the syrup tank so as to be constantly immersed in intimate thermal contact with the contents thereof, a syrup conduit extending ad- J'acent a wall of the receptacle from the metering means to a dispensing nozzle, and walls forming an insulating enclosure for said receptacle and conduits.

3. In apparatus for dispensing a cold mixed drink through a dispensing nozzle and for maintaining the component parts of the drink in a cold uniformly refrigerated condition prior to the dispensing operation, the combination of a receptacle for the water component of the beverage, a tank disposed in the water receptacle for storing the syrup component, refrigerant heat-absorbing means disposed in the receptacle for cooling the water therein and through the cooled water cooling the syrup tank and its contents, a metering device for causing and controlling the flow of cooled syrup from the tank to a dispensing nozzle, those portions of the metering device which contain syrup when the dispensing apparatus is inactive being disposed within the confines of the syrup tank so as to be constantly immersed in and cooled by the contents of said tank, and bafile means disposed in the syrup tank adjacent said portions for constantly maintaining a body of cold syrupin contact with said portions.

4. In apparatus for dispensing a cold mixed drink through a dispensing nozzle and for main cooling the water therein and through the cooled water cooling the syrup tank and its contents, a metering device for causing and controlling the flow of cooled syrup from the tank to a dispensing nozzle, those portions of the metering device which contain syrup when the dispensing apparatus is inactive being disposed within the confines of the syrup tank so'as to be constantly immersed 15 in and cooled by the contents of said tank, baflie means disposed in the syrup tank adjacent said 10 portions for constantly maintaining a body oi. cold syrup in contact with said portions, and vent means associated with the baflie means and extending above the normal liquid level in the syrup 5 tank for purging entrapped air to the atmosphere.

EVERT S. WEGMAN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the 10 file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,316,528 Wooten et a1 Sept. 16, 1919 1,776,539 Calleson Sept. 23, 1930 2,328,110 Thompson et a1. Aug. 31, 1943 2,391,003 Bowman Dec. 18, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1316528 *Mar 7, 1916Sep 16, 1919By Mesne AssignmentsA corpora
US1776539 *Jun 11, 1929Sep 23, 1930Drinkolette Sales CorpDrink-dispensing apparatus
US2328110 *Mar 14, 1941Aug 31, 1943Amp CorpBeverage dispensing apparatus
US2391003 *Nov 21, 1942Dec 18, 1945Frostidrink IncCarbonating apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2616607 *Mar 20, 1950Nov 4, 1952Perkins Ronald RCream dispenser
US2657628 *Jan 9, 1947Nov 3, 1953Wurlitzer CoBeverage dispensing apparatus
US2685952 *Jun 16, 1948Aug 10, 1954 Coin controlled beverage dispenser
US2748982 *Aug 23, 1951Jun 5, 1956Copping Bruce GBeverage dispensing apparatus
US2778534 *Jun 8, 1953Jan 22, 1957Ramsey Arthur CLiquid dispensing machine
US3386261 *Sep 6, 1966Jun 4, 1968Cornelius CoMethod of and apparatus for dispensing reconstituted beer
US4705193 *Aug 22, 1985Nov 10, 1987The Coca-Cola CompanyCirculation pump system in a storage vessel
US4781310 *Dec 19, 1986Nov 1, 1988The Coca-Cola CompanyBeverage dispenser
US4801048 *Jan 20, 1988Jan 31, 1989The Coca-Cola CompanyBeverage dispenser
US5058768 *Nov 13, 1990Oct 22, 1991Fountain Technologies, Inc.Methods and apparatus for dispensing plural fluids in a precise proportion
US5388725 *Nov 24, 1993Feb 14, 1995Fountain Fresh InternationalFluid-driven apparatus for dispensing plural fluids in a precise proportion
US6928824 *Jan 6, 2004Aug 16, 2005Icefloe Technologies Inc.Method and apparatus for controlled ice crystal formation in a beverage
US7378015Apr 15, 2004May 27, 2008The Clorox CompanyFiltered water enhancements
US7713482Dec 16, 2004May 11, 2010The Clorox CompanyControl scheme for enhanced filtered water systems
US8158084Oct 12, 2010Apr 17, 2012Brita LpControl scheme for enhanced filtered water systems
US8309030Mar 9, 2010Nov 13, 2012Brita LpControl scheme for enhanced filtered water systems
US8413844Feb 9, 2010Apr 9, 2013Pur Water Purification Products, Inc.Fluid container having an additive dispensing system
US8480979Mar 13, 2012Jul 9, 2013The Clorox CompanyControl scheme for enhanced filtered water systems
US8556127Jun 22, 2005Oct 15, 2013Pur Water Purification Products, Inc.Additive dispensing system for a refrigerator
US8893927Jun 22, 2005Nov 25, 2014Pur Water Purification Products, Inc.Cartridge for an additive dispensing system
US9061881 *Sep 23, 2011Jun 23, 2015Manitowoc Foodservice Companies, LlcSystem and method for harvesting energy savings on a remote beverage system
US20050097913 *Jan 6, 2004May 12, 2005Markus HessMethod and apparatus for controlled ice crystal formation in a beverage
US20050133427 *Apr 15, 2004Jun 23, 2005Rinker Edward B.Filtered water enhancements
US20050258082 *May 24, 2004Nov 24, 2005Lund Mark TAdditive dispensing system and water filtration system
US20060021919 *Jun 22, 2005Feb 2, 2006Olson Judd DCartridge for an additive dispensing system
US20080020096 *Aug 23, 2007Jan 24, 2008Blum Bradley JSystem for Adding Consumable Enhancing Additives to Drinking Water
US20080190827 *Apr 14, 2008Aug 14, 2008Rinker Edward BFiltered Water Enhancements
US20090272682 *Jul 16, 2009Nov 5, 2009Rinker Edward BFiltered Water Enhancements
US20100133297 *Feb 9, 2010Jun 3, 2010Richard Alan ArettFluid container having an additive dispensing system
US20110024456 *Oct 12, 2010Feb 3, 2011Rinker Edward BControl Scheme For Enhanced Filtered Water Systems
US20120078414 *Sep 23, 2011Mar 29, 2012Manitowoc Foodservice Companies, LlcSystem and method for harvesting energy savings on a remote beverage system
USRE30301 *Dec 15, 1975Jun 10, 1980The Cornelius CompanyBeverage mixing and dispensing apparatus
USRE40393 *Nov 3, 2006Jun 24, 2008Icefloe Technologies Inc.Method and apparatus for controlled ice crystal formation in a beverage
CN103380076A *Sep 23, 2011Oct 30, 2013曼尼托沃食品服务有限公司System and method for harvesting energy savings on a remote beverage system
CN103380076B *Sep 23, 2011Dec 9, 2015曼尼托沃食品服务有限公司用于在远程饮料系统上实现节能的系统和方法
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/339, 62/177, 62/435, 222/146.6, 222/129.2, 62/390, 222/129, 222/385, 62/393, 62/306
International ClassificationB67D1/08, B67D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB67D1/0857
European ClassificationB67D1/08D