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Publication numberUS2502736 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1950
Filing dateDec 22, 1948
Priority dateDec 22, 1948
Publication numberUS 2502736 A, US 2502736A, US-A-2502736, US2502736 A, US2502736A
InventorsMarcoe Reuben J
Original AssigneeMarcoe Reuben J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Intake vent
US 2502736 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

R. J. MARCOE INTAKE VENT Filed Dec. 22, 1948 INVENTOR. H., cQ/a@ Patented Apr. 4, 1950 UNITEDl STATES PTENT OFFICE INTAKE VENT Reuben J. Marcoe, Hermansville, Mich.

Application December 22, 1948, Serial No. 66,632

(Cl. 98ll9) 3 Claims. l

This invention relates to ventilators.

An object of thisV invention is to provide a ventilator for barns or other buildings which is designed for mounting on an air intake duct for regulating the intake of air, and distributing the air evenly and horizontally so that no cold drafts will be produced.

Another object of this invention is to provide a ventilator which can be manually adjusted to either opened or closed position, or may be adjusted so as to automatically control the intake of air.

A further object of this invention is to provide in a ventilator of this kind, a pivoted damper or valve and means for balancing the damper or valve so that the latter may automatically move to open position under a predetermined draft of air, the housing for the ventilator including latching means engageable by the balancing means for locking the damper or valve in either opened or closed position.

With the above and other objects in view, my invention consists in the arrangement, combination and details of construction disclosed in the drawing and specications, and then more particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawing,

Figure 1 is a detail front elevation of a ventilator constructed according to an embodiment of my invention, showing the ventilator mounted on an airv duct,

Figure 2 is a sectional' View taken on the line 2 2 of Figure 1,

Figure 3 is a fragmentary side elevation partly broken away and in section,

Figure 4 is a fragmentary sectional view taken on the line 4--4 of Figure 2,

Figure 5 is a sectional view taken on the line 5-5 of Figure 3.

Referring to the drawing, the numeral Ill designates generally a housing which is formed of opposite side walls I| and I2, and opposite end walls I3. The side and end walls II, I2 and I3 are formed at their upper edges with outwardly extending flanges I4, and a top wall I5 is secured to the flanges I4.

The top wall I5 is formed with an opening I6 which is adapted to register with an opening II formed in the bottom wall I8 of an air intake duct I9. The lower portion of the housing I0 is open and a horizontally disposed baille or distributor plate 20 is positioned in downwardly spaced relation with respect to the housing IIJ, being supported therebelow by means of a pair of angle bracket members 2| and also by means 55 of a side wall extension 22.. The air entering the housing ID is adapted to pass downwardly therethrough and then out through the opening 23 formed between the baille or distributor 20 and the lower portion of the housing I0.

A valve or dam-per plate 24 is rockably disposed in the housing I0, being mounted' on a trans'- versely extending shaft 25- which is journal-led through the end walls I3. The shaft 25 is secured to the valve plate 24 by providing a reverted or substantially Vshaped intermediate portion 26- in the shaft 25, and then threading this reverted securing portion 28 in the space formed between the lower sideof the plate 24 and a downwardly offset strap 2l which is struck from the body of the plate 24.

A downwardly extending` flange- 28 iscarried'. by the top wall l5 and is adapted to engage the valve plate 24 when the latter is rocked upwardly to closed position. A downwardly andv inwardly curved baffle 29 is fixed to the innerl side of the side wall |-2 extending downwardly toward the valve plate 24 and terminating substantially in alignment with the shaft 25 so as to direct` the air downwardly and inwardly of the-housing I3. When the valve plate 24 is in closed position this plate will substantially contact the lower or inner edge of the arcuate baiiie 29.

The valve plate 24*- is adapted to be automatically rocked to'closingposition by'means of a weight 33 which engages a right angular extension or arm 3| carried by one end of the shaft 25. The weight 3ftl is adapted; to bek adjusted lengthwise ofthe arm S31-by means of a set screw 32. If itis desired to lock the valve plate 241in either'open or closed position, this may be manually done by engaging the arm 3| with either one of a pair of keepers 33 and 34. The two keepers 33 and 34 are fixed to a supporting plate 35 which is fixed to one end wall I3 and extends downwardly and angularly therefrom, as shown in Figure 3.

The two keepers 33 and l34 are each at their free ends bent inwardly in the form of a hook, as shown in Figure 5, and are spaced apart a distance corresponding to the open and closed position of the valve plate 24. During the automatic operation of the device, the arm 3| is positioned in the space between the free ends vof the keepers, so that the swingingT movement of the ar-m 3| i-s thereby conned between the open and closed positions of the valve plate 24.

The arm 3| is fabricated of resilient rod material. Thus, if it is desired to lock the valve plate 24 in either a closed or open position, the arm 3| may be easily sprung inwardly so as to engage the 3 hook-shaped free end of the corresponding keeper.

In the use and operation of this device, the housing I is secured beneath the duct I9 with the opening l 6 registering with the outlet opening l1 in the duct i9. This ventilator is positioned in a building such as a barn or the like, having a ventilator fan forcing the air out of the building. In the event it is desired that the ventilator operate automatically by suction of air in the building which will draw the air downwardly through the housing I0, the arm 3l may be disengaged from both keepers 33 and 34. The weight 30 is adjusted along the length of the arm 3l so that when air is flowing downwardly through the housing I0, valve 24 will rock downwardly to open position, whereas when no draft is present or there is a reverse movement of air, valve plate 24 will swing upwardly to closed position. The incoming air passing downwardly through the housing I0 will strike the baie plate 2B and will then be directed horizontally from the housing l0 so that the incoming air will be evenly distributed about the upper portion of the enclosure within which this device is positioned, and no cold drafts of air will be directed downwardly. In the event it is desired to lock the valve plate 24 in open position, arm 3| is raised to engage upper keeper 33. If it is desired to lock valve plate 24 in closed position, arm 3| is rocked downwardly and engaged with keeper 34.

I do not mean to confine myself to the exact details of construction herein disclosed, but claim all variations falling within the purview of the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. A ventilator for an air intake duct comprising a housing formed of opposite side and end walls, a top wall fixed to the upper ends of said side' and end walls and having an air intake opening, a transversely curved baiile secured to a wall of said housing adjacent said opening and extending downwardly and inwardly from the latter, a shaft positioned adjacent the lower edge of said baile and rockably carried by the end walls of said housing, a valve plate secured to said shaft and extending across said opening for controlling the passage of air through the latter, a horizontal baille spaced from the bottom of said housing and carried by the latter, a right angularly disposed arm carried by one end of said shaft, a weight carried by said arm, and means carried by the end wall of said housing adjacent said arm for latching the latter in open and closed positions of said valve plate.

2. A ventilator for an air intake duct comprising a housing formed of opposite side and end walls, a top Wall xed to the upper ends of said side and end walls and having an air intake opening, a transversely curved baffle secured to a wall of said housing adjacent said opening and extending downwardly and inwardly from the latter, a shaft positioned adjacent the lower edge of said baille and rockably carried by the end walls of said housing, a valve plate secured to said shaft and extending across said opening for controlling the passage of air through the latter, a horizontal baille spaced from the bottom of said housing and carried by the latter, a right angularly disposed arm carried by one end of said shaft, a weight carried by said arm, a plate secured to the end wall of said housing adjacent said arm, and a pair of spaced keepers secured to said plate, said arm being resilient and engageable with a selected one of said keepers for holding said valve plate in open and closed position.

3. A ventilator for an air intake duct comprising a housing formed of opposte side and end walls, a top wall fixed to the uppervends of said side and end walls and having an air intake opening, a transversely curved baille secured to a wall of said housing adjacent said opening, and extending downwardly and inwardly from the latter, a valve plate pivotally carried by the end walls of said housing adjacent the lower edge of said baille and extending across said opening for controlling the passage of air through the latter, a horizontal baille spaced from the bottom of said housing and carried by the latter for diifusing air discharged from said housing, and counterbalancing means for normally holding said valve plate in a closed position.

REUBEN J. MARCOE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 323,587 Merriman Aug. 4, 1885 1,335,929 Allen Apr. 6, 1920 1,538,645 Markey May 19, 1925 1,766,876 Busby June 24, 1930 1,874,083 Clay Aug. 30, 1932 1,913,974 Clay June 13, 1933 1,975,316 Ferris Oct. 2, 1934 2,314,003 Mader Mar. 16, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US323587 *Aug 4, 1885F OneLewis merrimalsr
US1335929 *Apr 5, 1919Apr 6, 1920Allen Victor MAutomatic window-ventilator
US1538645 *Mar 1, 1923May 19, 1925James Mfg CoVentilating mechanism
US1766876 *Aug 24, 1929Jun 24, 1930Richard R MacmahonVentilator for buildings
US1874083 *Nov 16, 1927Aug 30, 1932Clay Equipment CorpVentilating device
US1913974 *Sep 17, 1930Jun 13, 1933Clay Joseph BVentilator
US1975316 *May 11, 1932Oct 2, 1934StarlineVentilator
US2314003 *Jun 14, 1940Mar 16, 1943John SpargoCounterbalanced louver construction
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2698570 *Nov 7, 1951Jan 4, 1955Feinberg Archie STemperature control air deflecting louver
US4823679 *Apr 29, 1988Apr 25, 1989Robbins R RalphBuilding ventilation system with air inlet flap control
US4850265 *Jul 1, 1988Jul 25, 1989Raydot IncorporatedAir intake apparatus
US5195927 *Aug 5, 1991Mar 23, 1993Raydot, IncorporatedAir intake apparatus for inner wall
US5567114 *Apr 26, 1995Oct 22, 1996F F Seeley Nominees Pty LtdFan closure flap
US6454247 *Dec 7, 2000Sep 24, 2002Ff Seeley Nominees Pty LtdAnti-backdraft shutter assembly for an axial flow fan
EP0078972A1 *Oct 26, 1982May 18, 1983Gebrüder Trox, GmbHVolumetric flow regulator valve for ventilating systems
Classifications
U.S. Classification454/259, 454/313
International ClassificationF24F13/14, F24F11/047, F24F11/04
Cooperative ClassificationF24F13/1426, F24F11/047
European ClassificationF24F13/14D, F24F11/047