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Publication numberUS2503723 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 11, 1950
Filing dateAug 17, 1944
Priority dateAug 17, 1944
Publication numberUS 2503723 A, US 2503723A, US-A-2503723, US2503723 A, US2503723A
InventorsGothard Thomas J
Original AssigneeRichard Wunn
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fog nozzle
US 2503723 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 11, 1950 T. J. Gon-IARD 2,503,723

FOG NozzLE Filed Aug. 17, 1944 mvg-N rag.-

omq J- GoTHA-R-D,

Patented Apr. 1l, Vv1950 4 Thomas J. Gothard, Los` Angeles, Calif., assigner to Richard Wunn,y 'Long Beach, Calif..

y Application August 17, 1944, Serial No. 549,871

' s claims. (c1. '29e-"67) vThis invention relates to devices used for4 vaporizing liquids. for spraying and fire-fighting purposes.`

One. of the objects of this invention is to provide a device with a rotor for breaking up the liquid and mounted so that the fog-nozzle develops a tendency of cleaning itself by the action of the rotor and the particular mounting of the rotor in the nozzle.

`Another object is to provide the rotor with u turbine-like impelling means.

Another object is to design the impelling means of an open form, to distinguish from holes, perforations, or apertures.

Anotherv object is to provide particularly designed edges between the rotor and nozzle at points of discharge from the nozzle.

Another object is to provide such edges in cooperating pairs forming impingement discharges.

Another object is to provide discharge disturbing means opposite to the discharging end of the impelling means of the rotor.

Other objects will appear from the following description and appended claims as well as from the accompanying drawing, in which- Fig. 1. is a longitudinal midsectional view of a device inaccordance with this invention in form of a fire-fighting nozzle.

Fig. 2 is a cross section on line 2-2 through the front end of the inner supporting tubing of the nozzle. f

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary cross section on line 3.3 of: Fig. 1 through the perforated disc.

, Fig. 4 is a fragmentary plan View of the rotor, showing the open turbine-impelling means and recesses for cutting down on the weight ofthe rotor.j n

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary plan View over the front edge of the housing of the nozzle, being of the disturbing means for the discharge.

Fig. 6 is a slight modification of the form of disturbing means.

Fig. '7 is an edge view of the rotor. f

Fig.` 8v is a longitudinal midsectional view of an insert in the front end of the nozzle for an open stream discharge.

Fig. 9 is a schematic sketch for discharge by edge-modification.

Fig. 10 is another schematic sketch for a slightly modified form of edge-discharge.

.Fig. 11 is a schematic detail for connecting the central front cone with a control Within the adapter-connection.

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary cross section on line I'2-l2 of Figure 13 through a turbine impelling means of a slightly modified form in shape of a shallow half-round channel instead of the deep cut in the end surface of the rotor. Y

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary plan view of a modified formof turbinewheel.` w 1, f

, 2 The inner supporting tubing 9 is provided with a threaded portion I 0 at one end, opposite tothe discharging end II. The outer edge of the discharging end isbeveled at I2, and towards the center is a discharging bore I3, with a beveled` A central cone I5 is designed and made4 to cooperate With-the beveled edge I4 to form a narrow annular space for discharging in the direction of the arrow I6.

A cap Il is provided with a beveled edge I8 to co-operate with the beveled edge I2 for a discharge in the direction ofthe arrow I9.

'I'he discharges in' the directions ofthe arrows I6 and I9 form an impingement for the resulting cylindrical discharge in -the direction of the arrows 20.

It is merely a matter of makingthis discharge of a finer or coarser type in order to obtain extremely fine fog, or a coarser spray-like fog.

One, or more, rotors are mounted on the outside of the -inner supporting tubing 9. In the case, asillustrated, an intermediate partition 2| is provided as an integral part of the central tubinggto which counter-pieces areaddedin form of caps 22 and 23, between which the two rotors 2l! and 24a are disposed. i I

VVThe tubing 9 is provided with passages 36 of ample size so as to avoid clogging of these pas` sages as much as possible, and there is ample spacing |24 between the inner face of the central part of the rotor and the tubing, for free and equal distribution of matter passing from the passages 36 outwardly around .the central -part of the rotor, as will be described more fully hereafter. i f

The spacing |25, on the other hand, is not necessarily as large as at |24; neither is the spacing at |26, which isv over the outer periphery of some parts of the rotor. These spacings |25 and |26 may actually be rather narrow, to allow almost a guiding contact between rotor and stationary parts of the nozzle, though these spacings are wide` enough to assure floatingactionof the rotor in operation as soon as the rotor centralizes itself; the unproportionally wide showing of the spacings [25 and |26 being here only adopted for sake of clearer illustration of actual spacings existing. .v l

There are, thus, certain raised portions 25 on the tubing 9 awayfrom the passages 36 and away from the wider spacing I24, which is actually wider for purpose of distributing of passing matter. l n n As a matter of fact, one of the lprinciples of this invention involves that there should-not =be any actual bearings in this device, all the pas sages, and spaces, and channe1s,and impelling means having been designed to,faci1itate :'loaty ing actiongof the rotcrs.

3 The portions 26 of the caps 22 and 23, as well as of the intermediate partition 2|, overlap theoutlet ends of the impelling channels 21 of the rotors in such a manner that the discharge from the rotors is splashed against these portions,

whereby the discharge is broken up considerably.

Moreover, these portions are roughened, or provided with extra pockets 31, see Fig. 5, which may be modified variously, as for instance at 31a in Fig. 6.

In Figs. 1, 4, and 7, the impelling channels 21, are illustrated in form of rather deep and narrow cuts; but it should be understood that these impelling means may easily be modied to comply with scientific principles used for turbines, such asl thev shallow channels 21a in Figs. 12 and 13. Such channels can easily be produced; particularly, consideringk that such rotors may easily be madeby the method vof die-casting, since su-ch channels would be inthe surfaces of the rotors.

As illustrated, the rotors are rather wide, with hub-like portions, which may involve undue weights, which, in turn, may necessitate the pockets 28r for weight reduction.

The caps and intermediate partition, together withrthe central tubing, form the housing for the rotors.

In order to provide impinging, or impingement-discharges from this combination-housing and rotors, the edges 29 and 30, on theorie side, and the rotor-edges 3l and 32, on the opposite side, are suitably and co-operatively shaped to produce impingement-discharges in the directions of the arrowsv 33 and 34, with resultant discharges in the direction of the arrows 35.

From ther illustration-in Fig. 1 it will`1be clear that the resultant irnpingement-discharge can be varied to quite an extent by the mere variation of .the angles at the edges. Moreover, such impingement-discharge can easily be provided in a plane at'right angles to the central axis of the whole fog-nozzle, so as to create a wall-like fog back of the iorwardlydischarging central fog or spray behind which an operator can iind protection whiie approaching an intense fire. This has been demonstrated with actual fires.

Fig. l9 illustrates thus schematically the last mentioned edge-forming; while Fig. 10 illus trates a schematical arrangement lfor morea-cute angles than thosein Fig. 1, one edge being undercut to create such increased angles.

In Fig. 1, the central cone I -is mounted on an apertured disc 38, in which the apertures, or holes 39.are preferably arranged in a slanting direction as illustrated in Fig. 3, to create a whirling of the liquid in one direction before discharging in the direction 16'; while the 'apertures 40 in the front end ofthe central tubing 9 are preferably provided vto create -a whirling in the `opposite direction before discharging in the vdirection of the arrow 19'; this combination being intended to intensi-ty the impinging action in the resultant discharge inthe arrow 2i).

All these hereinbefore described arrangements are distinctlyfor fog-like discharges, which have been found more effective than any heavy stream.

In ycases where iiremen, however, desire a heavy central stream, this can easily be provided by merely substituting the sleeve illustrated in Fig. 8. The end 43 abuts against the shoulder 4l in the rend of the tubing 9; the sleeve 42 being provided with the threaded portion 44a to fit in place of lthe disc 38; lthe cone l5 'being herewith repl'ace'in such a case.

However, some lopenators may desire, or even 4 require, to have the central cone I5 or other parts arranged adjustably while in operative position within the nozzle.

For such cases and purposes, lever-controls may be embodiedin the thread-adapter-piece 45.

, Such adapters are often necessitated by the fact that such appliances, as nozzles, must be used on apparatus-parts with diiierent threads. In such adapters, it is not difcult to provide a small shaft 46 with a handle of some sort 41 embodying a cam 48, which actuates a member 49, to transmitmotions through a connecting-rod 50 to the cone l5 in the manner indicated in Fig. 11.

From the foregoing it will be understood that the liquid can be passed to the opposite sides of the rotors from the passages36 lby wayrof the large distributing-spacing |24, to act" with equal pressures on opposite sides of the rotors, so as to result in a floatingsuspension of the rotors within the housing and within the passing liquid.

Such floating suspension and` operation tends to eliminate any material friction or wear-01T, to assure the utmost employmentof an existing force in the liquid on the rotors.v This full utilization of force produces the best speed in the rotors, thereby facilitating a self-cleaningrandan evenly distributed impingement'all around.

Though the edges ofthe rotors and housing have been illustrated spaced considerably, as 4at the points ofdischarge indicated at 33` and 34,

particularly, between the disc-like terminations,-

it should be understood thatl this was done only in-order to avoid any blurring of lines in the appearance of the drawing. However, such spacings can be quite small when desired.

Moreover, these disc-like terminations of the rotors can be quite thin, particularly, where automatic shut-oil is desired rat' the very edges, to avoid dripping after power-sl'nu;oii`.` In fact, they are desired to act in form of diaphragme, to automatically close against the opposite edges .of the-housing as soon as the liquid is shutoff, which is of great importance in fire-lighting, such as withgasoline or gas, since drippings may start a newfire, or `even an explosion. Such diaphragms, on the other hand, easily open more and more when more pressure is turned-on, or applied without requiring adjusting ymeans for the spacings.

In fact, the rotors may loe-made .ofseveral sheetdiscs, placed 'back to back, or face to face, etc., with certain of discs sim-ply formed in dies with channels, such as indicated in Figs. 12 and'13'; Plain spacer-discs may then be inter-posed where Fig. 7 indicates portions of smaller diameter as integral parts ofthe rotor between the edge-pieces 3l and 32 and von opposite sides thereof neXt to the outer channeled portions ,of rotor 24 of Fig. 7.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. In a .fog-nozzle, :a housinghaving inlet passages and having outlet-passages with paired edges converging towards and being' annularly spaced from one another, and a rotor mounted about said inlet passages and provided with edges corresponding to and extending between said first-named edges s o pas to form an lm pinygement for any lmatter dis-charging Afrom said inlet-passages around opposite sides and `over the periph'- ery `of the rotor, the rotor having channeled impelling-mean-s in the opposite sides -for actuating the rotory a-nd for-ming communicating means between saicl inlet :and loutlet passages with equal distribution over the opposite sides -for floating action of the rotor.

y'2. In a 'tog-nozzle, a housing `lhaving inlet :passages and having outlet-passages with paired edges converging towards and :being annularly spa'ced from one another, and 1a rotor provided with turbine-like effective channels in the opposite sides with intake-ends disposed to receive matter from said inlet-passages and including corresponding edges with respect to the firstnamed edges and extending therebetween to form an impingement discharging means between such combined edges over the periphery of the rotor whereby a discharge of said matter may be created in a plane transversely to the central axis of the nozzle.

3. In a fog-nozzle, a housing having inlet passages and ha/ving outlet-passages with paired edges converging towards and being annularly spaced from one another, rotors provided with turbine-like effective channels in the opposite sides with intake-ends disposed to` communicate with said inlet-passages and with outlet-ends disposed to communicate with said outlet-passages and including edges extending to the rst-named edges to form an impingement discharging means between such combined edges over the periphery of the rotor whereby a discharge may be created in a plane transversely to the central axis of the nozzle, the edges of one rotor and corresponding housing-edges differing from another set of rotoredges and housing-edges so as to produce a moreforwardly directed discharge in one set over the other.

4. In a fog-nozzle, a housing having distinct portions of a smaller diameter and other portions of larger diameter, the portions with smaller diameter having a central bore and inlet-passages transversely from the bore outwardly, the portions with larger diameterhaving spaced edges with faces converging towards one another in paired edges and forming outlet-passages therebetween, 'and a rotor provided with impelling channels disposed in a plane crosswise to and extending tangentially about the axis of the housing and about which the rotor turns, the channels forming communicating means between the inletand outlet-passages of the housing so that the combination of these channels with the coactively designed housing is :adapted to actuate1 the rotor by anyl medium passing through the passages and to also intensify the vaporizing action upon such medium over the periphery of the rotor when so actuated.

5. In a fog-nozzle, a housing having distinct portions of a smaller diameter and other distinct portions of larger diameter, the portions with smaller diameter having a central bore and inletpassages transversely from the bore outwardly, the portions with larger diameter having paired and spaced edges with faces converging towards one another and forming outlet-passages therebetween, and a rotor provided with a channeled impelling portion in opposite sides land extending transversely from the smaller to the larger portions of the housing, the rotor being also provided with a portion projecting beyond the channeled portion and axially therebetween and extending to points between said converging faces in the outer edges of the housing and having faces corresponding therewith so as to keep portions of any medium passing through the nozzle separated to opposite sides fof the rotor within the housing for impingement collision outside of the housing.

6. In la. fog-nozzle, a stationary housing being otherwise closed but having distincty portions of smaller diameter and other distinct portions of larger diameter, the portions with smaller diameter having a central bore and inlet-passages transversely from the bore outwardly, the portions with larger diameter having raised and spaced edges with faces converging towards one another and forming outlet-passages therebetween, the housing having roughened portions inside of the housing near' said. edges, anda rotor provided with a channeled impelling portion in opposite sides and extending transversely from the smaller to the roughened portions of the housing, the rotor being also provided with a portion projecting beyond the channeled portion :and axially therebetween and extending to points between said converging faces and being itself provided with faces corresponding with said first-named faces so as to bring any medium passed through the nozzle and around the rotor into impingement over the front of the rotor outside of the housing.

7. In a fog-nozzle, a housing having a smaller cylindrical portion with transverse inlet-passages and having a larger cylindrical portion with outlet-passages formed by paired edges converging towards and being annularly spaced from one another, and a rotor mounted about said inlet-passages and provided with impelling-portions` between said smaller and larger cylindrical portions of the housing, the rotor having also an extensionportion with edges corresponding to and extending lbetween said first-named edges so as to form an irnpinging means for any matter passed from inlet to outlet passages, the edge-forming portions of the rotor being made of thin material normally seating closely on the edges of the housing and adapted to be moved away from such seating position more or les under varying pressures of said matter.

8. In a fog-nozzle, a housing having a smaller cylindrical portion with transverse inlet-passages and having a larger cylindrical portion with outlet-passages formed by paired edges converging towards and being :annularly spaced from one another, and a rotor mounted about said inletpassages and provided with an impelling portion between said smaller and larger cylindrical portions of the housing, the rotor having also an extension-portion, the impelling portion being channeled with turbine-like effect and forming communication between the inlet and outlet passages to cause a moving of the rotor, the extension-portion of the rotor being provided with edges corresponding to and extending between said first-named edges so as to form an impinging means for any matter passed from inlet to outlet passages, the extension-portion being made of thin material normally seating closely upon the edges of the housing and adapted to be moved away from such seating position more or less under varying pressures of said matter.

THOMAS J. GOTHARD.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the iile of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 433,639 Arnold Aug. 5, 1890 473,759 Klein Apr. 26, 1892 894,059 Rosborough July 21, 1908 930,800 Sanger Aug. 10, 1909 1,236,073 Fesler Aug. 7, 1917 1,490,632 Paul, Jr Apr. 15, 1924 1,760,903 Henkel June 3, 1930 1,968,126 Center July 3l, 1934 2,175,310 Pontius, Jr Oct. 10, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US433639 *Aug 5, 1890 Oil-burner
US473759 *Oct 9, 1890Apr 26, 1892 Atomizer
US894059 *Apr 13, 1908Jul 21, 1908John RosboroughNozzle.
US930800 *Mar 20, 1909Aug 10, 1909Milton J SangerProtection-nozzle for fire-hose.
US1236073 *Jun 14, 1916Aug 7, 1917Fess System CoCentrifugal oil-burner.
US1490632 *Jun 15, 1921Apr 15, 1924Ed RosengrenCentrifugal atomizer
US1760903 *Feb 2, 1927Jun 3, 1930Frederick HenkelSprinkler head
US1968126 *Dec 29, 1932Jul 31, 1934Andrew J CenterOil burner
US2175310 *Apr 29, 1936Oct 10, 1939Internat Engineering CorpBurner
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2683624 *Apr 30, 1951Jul 13, 1954Ruisaburo FukuyamaVariable spray nozzle
US2692800 *Oct 8, 1951Oct 26, 1954Gen ElectricNozzle flow control
US2733961 *Apr 25, 1952Feb 7, 1956Bogus Electric Manufacturing CoAtomizer
US7568635 *Sep 28, 2004Aug 4, 2009Illinois Tool Works Inc.Turbo spray nozzle and spray coating device incorporating same
Classifications
U.S. Classification239/240
International ClassificationB05B3/04, B05B3/02
Cooperative ClassificationB05B3/0427
European ClassificationB05B3/04C2H1