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Publication numberUS2505641 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1950
Filing dateAug 6, 1946
Priority dateAug 6, 1946
Publication numberUS 2505641 A, US 2505641A, US-A-2505641, US2505641 A, US2505641A
InventorsHowe Herbert B
Original AssigneeHowe Herbert B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Closure for steel barrels
US 2505641 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 25, 1950 H. B. HOWE CLOSURE FOR STEEL BARRELS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Aug. 6, 1946 INVENTOR.

HERBERT B. HOWE W r m. 154. ATTORNEYS.

April 25, 1950 H. B. HOWE CLOSURE FOR STEEL BARREL-S 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Aug. 6, 1946 FIGS.

7 INVENTOR- HERBERT 5. HOWE FIG] rim

. 24 A fro/2N5 Y6.

Patent Apr. 25, 1950 UNITED' STATES PATENT OFFICE.

CLOSURE FOB. STEEL BARRELS Herbert B. Howe, Chatlum, N. 1. Application Aus'ust 8, 1946, Serial No. 688,792

2 Claims.

The present invention relates to closures for open head containers and more particularly to a new and improved closure for metal containers such as steel drums or barrels of the type used in the chemical industries.

Heretofore, closures of this type have been secured to the drum by steel bands held together by nuts and bolts or other types of locks in such fashion as to provide a seal against leakage of the contents from the drum. Closures of this type are not entirely satisfactory because they require parts in addition to the closure itself and are thereforerelatively expensive to manufacture. Such additional parts tend to become distorted in shape or lost in handling while the closure is disassembled from the container so that containers are frequently rendered-unavailable for reuse because of lost closure parts. Also, assembly and disassembly operations on such closures require tools for tightening or loosening the nuts and bolts and are relatively wasteful of time and manpower.

In addition, band type closures for steel containers of this type generally rely on a force applied substantially perpendicularly to the sidewall of the container for securing the closure to the container, and the closure seats tightly on the container only if the dimensions of both are correct. Consequently, if there is any wear between the cooperating sealing surfaces of the container and the closure in use. leakage is very likely to occur on reuse.

It is an object of the invention, accordingly, to provide a new and improved closure of the above type which is free from the deficiencies of the prior art, is easy and inexpensive to manufacture, and is simple and effective in use.

A further object of the invention is to provide a new and improved closure of the above character which can be readily assembled to and disassembled from a container without using any additional parts or tools and without the need for time and manpower consuming operations.

Another object of the invention is to provide a new and improved closure of the above character in which a closure member has means co operating with means on the container to form a simple and effective closure regardless of the number of times the closure and container are reused.

The objects of the invention are attained by forming a circumferential bearing surface of considerable area at the upper rim of the container, which is adapted to be tightly nested in a cooperating bearing surface of considerable 2 area formed in a disc-like closure member. The closure member is provided with outwardly projecting, inclined, locking surfaces and. cooperating inwardly projecting, inclined, locking surfaces are formed in the upper portion of the container. I

To secure the closure member to the container, the closure member is inserted into the open end of the container in such fashion that the bearing surface on the container is snugly nested in the cooperating bearing surface in the closure memher. The latter is then turned by hand until the locking surfaces on the container and the closure member are tightly engaged, thereby bringing the cooperating bearing surfaces on the closure member and the container tightly together to form an effective seal.

To disassemble the closure member after assembly, it is pressed downwardly towards the container and is turned by hand in the direction opposite that required for assembly.

In accordance with the invention, the closure member and container are provided with resilient portions which apply tension between the closure member and container, when assembled. With this construction, the cooperating bearing surfaces on the closure member and the container can always be brought together to form an effective seal, regardless of any wear of the parts.

It will be apparent that this novel construction provides a highly desirable and effective closure for metal containers. Since the closure member is an integral unit and requires no additional parts for assembly to a container, it is relatively inexpensive to manufacture, and there are no extra parts to become distorted in shape or to get lost. Further, since it is only necessary to turn the closure by hand in assembling it to or disassembling it from a container, no tools are needed, and the time and manpower required for these operations are materially reduced. Moreover, closures constructed according to the invention may be reused almost without limit, since an eifective seal can be obtained regardless of wear of the cooperating bearing surfaces.

Additional objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. l is a view in perspective of a metal drum and a closure member therefor constructed according to the present invention;

Fig. 2 is a partial top view of the closure member shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a partial rear view of the closure Fig. 7 is a partial view in longitudinal section of the closure member in position in the top of a metal drum, with the cooperating, inclined locking surfaces out of engagement; and

Fig. 8 is a partial view in longitudinal section of the drum and closure member of Fig. 7, with the cooperating, inclined locking surfaces tightly engaged.

In Fig. 1, the invention is illustrated as applied to a conventional steel drum IU of the type used for storing dry, powdered materials or liquids such as petroleum or chemicals, for example. In accordance with the invention, the upper rim of the drum I is rolled over to form a bead i l, preferably of substantially circular cross-section, as shown in greater detail in Fig. 7.

Spaced from the top of the drum in are a plurality of inwardly projecting locking members-l2. In the embodiment shown in Fig. 1, four locking members 12 are shown which are substantially equal in length and which are disposed substantially 90 apart. The locking members i 2 each have a bottom surface l3 (Fig. '7) lying substantially perpendicularly to the axis of the drum [0, and forming an inclined plane sloping slightly downwardly in the direction of the arrows, as shown in greater detail in Fig. 1.

Above the drum ill in Fig. 1 is shown a discshaped closure member 14. The outer rim of the closure member I4 is rolled over to form an annular recess 15 (Fig. 5) into which the bead II on the rim of the drum I0 is adapted to be snugly received when the closure member I4 is assembled in the drum ID, as shown in greater detail in Fig. 7. The outer edge of the closure member I4 is preferably beaded at IE to provide strength and rigidity. Further, the bead l6 preferably lies below the bead II on the container in, so that if the bead I6 receives a lateral blow, it will be bent in under the bead II and will tend to make the closure more rather than less effective.

The closure member I4 is provided with a cir-' -cumferential, downwardly extending portion H.- (Fig. 6) of substantially the same outside diameter as the inside diameter of the top of the drum Ill. The downwardly extending portion I! should preferably slant inwardly, as shown in- Figs. 5-8, to facilitate its insertion into the drum- I0, and the upper portion of the drum It should be similarly shaped to insure a tight fit. 1 Below the portion I1 is a relatively short; inwardly and downwardly tapering, circumferential portion I8 and a downwardly extending, circumferential portion l9, terminating in an annular depression 20 surrounding the substantially flat bottom2l o the closure member i4 (Figs. 2 and 6). a

0 petroleum or chemicals, for example, require that' 4 projecting locking members I! on the drum II and are provided with bearing surfaces 23 substantially perpendicular to the axis of the drum It, as shown in greater detail in Figs. 5 and 8. The locking members 22 are spaced a sufllcient distance below the rim of the closure member l4 so that the bearing surfaces 23 on the locking members 22 can engage the bearing surfaces I l on the locking members l2 ot the drum in. The bearing surfaces 23\ are, also inclined slightly downwardly in the direction of the arrows, as

.shown in Fig. 1.

To secure the closure member l4 to the drum I0, the closure member I4 is inserted in the top of the drum III with the outwardly projecting locking members 22 lying directly above the spaces between the inwardly projecting locking members l2 on the drum It. In this position, the closure member I4 is pushed downwardly until the bead II is snugly nested within the annular recess ii at the rim oi. the closure member [4, as shown in Fig. 7. The closure member I4 is then rotated in the direction indicated by the arrows in Fig. 1, until the bearing surfaces 23 on the outwardly projecting locking members 22 of the'closure member H are tightly engaged with the bearing surfaces l3 0n the inwardly projecting locking members l2 of the drum It, as shown in Fig. 8. If desired, a conventional gasket may be inserted between the bead II and the annular recess l5 as further protection against leakage.

In order to provide a tight joint, it is preierable so to construct the inwardly projecting locking members I2 of the drum in and the outwardly projecting locking members 22 of the closure member l4 that a narrow space 24 exists between them, as shown in greater detail in Figs. 7 and 8. By virtue of this construction, the downwardly tapering portion l8 of the closure member effectively constitutes a leaf spring which is placed under tension and tends to flatten out when the closure member [4 is turned clockwise to the locking position illustrated in Fig. 8. The bearing surfaces 23 and I! of the closure member, locking members 22, and the container closure members i 2, respectively, also are sufllciently resilient to act like leaf springs and apply tension between the closure member i4 and the container I0.

It will be readily understood that even if the closure member l4 turns slightly in the counterclockwise direction, due to a sudden jar or blow for example, the tension in the downwardly tapered portion I8 and in the cooperating bearing surfaces 23 and is will continue to hold the bead H on the drum i0 tightly nested within therecess is in the closure member l4.

The specifications for steel drums of the type required for shipment of powdered materials,

no leakage occur in a test in which the drum is dropped once on an edge from a height of four feet. Steel drums equipped.with closures con-.

structed according to the present invention have 5 been successfully dropped many times from a Formed in the downwardly extending portion I9 of the closure member I 4 are a plurality of. outwardly projecting locking members 22. As shown in Fig. 1, four locking members '22 are provided which are substantially equal in length and which are disposed substantially apart. Also, the locking members 22 are preferably height of six feet on an edge and have shown no leakage, despite the rough handling encountered.-

It will be seen that container closures constructed according to the invention may be easily and cheaply manufactured. The closure member l4 may be made from a single metal blank and the portions l1, l8 and I9 and the depression 20 may be formed in a single operation. The out- I v wardly'projecting locking members 22 may be .shorter than the spaces between the inwardly 14 formed in the same press immediately after thedrawing operation, or in another press at a subsequent time, as desired.

It will be noted from Figs. 3 and 4 that the depression 20 and the downwardly tapered circumferential portion 18 of the closure member l4 provide sumcient metal to enable the outwardly projecting locking members 22 to be formed without tearing. As shown in Figs. 3 and 4, the metal forming the depression 20 is drawn upwardly below the outwardly projecting locking members 22 at 24 and the downwardly tapered portion I8 is drawn downwardly towards the tops of the outwardly projecting locking members 22 at 25. Also, the annular depression 20 provides greater rigidity and tends to minimize distortion of the closure member 14 when subject to shock or strain.

From the foregoing, it will be readily apparent that the invention provides highly effective closures for drums of the type used for the shipment of powdered materials, petroleum, chemicals and the like. By providing a closure member which is adapted to be inserted in the top of the drum and in which are formed a plurality of outwardly projecting locking members adapted to cooperate with corresponding inwardly projecting locking members in the drum for securing the closure member to the drum, 9. simple and effective closure is produced which can be assembled or disassembled merely by turning it by hand. No additional parts are required nor is it necessary to use tools for assembling the closure to or disassembling it from the drum. As a result, a closure is provided which is inexpensive to manufacture and which requires-a minimum of time and manpower for its assembly and disassembly.

While a specific embodiment has been inscribed in detail herein, it will be understood that the invention is not to be limited thereto but is susceptible of numerous changes in form and detail within the scope of the following claims.

I claim:

1. A container and closure therefor, said container having a cylindrical wall portion defining an opening therein, a continuous outwardly extending circumferential sealing surface of curved cross section formed as a part of said cylindrical wall portion; a plurality of angularly spacedapart locking members projectin inwardly from said cylindrical wall portion, each of said locking members having a downwardly facing bearing surface substantially perpendicular to said cylindrical wall portion and being slightly inclined with respect to a plane perpendicular to the ionflitudinal axis of said cylindrical wall portion; said closure being of substantially disc-like shape and having a continuous outwardly extending circumferential sealing surface conforming to and adapted to overlie the sealing surface on said cylindrical wall portion to form a tight joint, said closure also having a central depressed portion forming a peripheral wall, the upper portion of said peripheral wall snugly fitting said cylindrical wall portion and the lower portion of said peripheral wall having a plurality of angularly spacedapart outwardly projecting locking members, the length of said closure locking members being less than the spacing between the adjacent container locking members to facilitate insertion of the closure in the container; each of said closure locking members having a bearing surface lying substantially perpendicular to said peripheral wall of the closure and being slightly inclined with respect toaplaneperpendiculartotheaxlsofsaidperipheral wall, such that when the closure is turned in the container the locking member bearing surfaces on the cylindrical wall portion of the container tightly engage the locking member bearing surfaces on the closure, bringing the cirat one end thereof, a continuous outwardly extending circumferential bead forming a sealing surface of curved cross section at the rim denning said opening of the container, a plurality of ahgularly spaced-apart locking members projecting inwardly from the cylindrical wall of the container, each of said locking members having a downwardly facing bearing surface substantially perpendicular to the cylindrical wall of the container and being slightly inclined with respect to a plane perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of said cylindrical wall; said closure having a continuous circumferential, outwardly extending lip of substantially inverted U-shaped cross-section within which the circumferential bead on the container is adapted to be tightly nested, and having an upper peripheral portion extending into the container having substantially the same outside diameter as the inside diameter of said container opening, an inwardly tapering intermediate portion, and a lower peripheral portion of reduced diameter extending into the container and having a substantially hat bottom; a plurality of angularl-y spaced-apart locking members projecting outwardly from said lower peripheral portion, the length of said closure locking members being less than the spacing between the adjacent container locking members to facilitate insertion of the closure in the container; each of said closure locking members having a bearing surface lying substantially perpendicular to said lower peripheral wall portion of the closure and being slightly inclined with respect to a plane perpendicular to the axis of said lower peripheral wall portion, such that when the closure is turned in the container the locking member bearing surfaces on the cylindrical wall of the container tightly engage the locking member bearing surfaces on the closure, bringing the circumierential sealing surfaces on the closure and on the cylindrical wall of the container towards each other to form an effective seal.

HERBERT B. HOWE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATEN'IS Number Name Date 1,013,830 Weimer Jan. 2, 1912 1,431,218 Cooke Oct. 10, 1923 1,687,887 Pletcher Oct. 16, 1928 1,715,146 Pletcher May 28, 1929 1,823,861 Michelin Sept. 15, 1931 1,925,503 Schmidt Sept. 5, 1933 1,980,995 Halloway Nov. 20, 1934 1,981,864 Hothersall Nov. 27, 1934 v FOREIGN PATENTS Numben Country Date 18,750 Great Britain A. D. 1904 339.311 Great Britain Dec. 5, 1930 188,308 Switzerland June 16, 1934

Patent Citations
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US1431218 *Dec 16, 1919Oct 10, 1922Pittsburgh Can CompanyCan
US1687887 *Aug 11, 1926Oct 16, 1928Pletcher Eugene MScrew friction lock for cans
US1715146 *Oct 6, 1928May 28, 1929Pletcher Eugene MScrew friction lock for cans
US1823861 *Oct 25, 1929Sep 15, 1931Pinaud IncContainer for toilet powder
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US1980995 *Mar 9, 1931Nov 20, 1934American Can CoContainer
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2661863 *Apr 22, 1950Dec 8, 1953Howe Herbert BClosure for containers
US5628417 *Apr 25, 1995May 13, 1997Van Halteren; JacobMulti-start blow molded locking bottles
US5996836 *Jul 11, 1997Dec 7, 1999Betras Plastics, Inc.Drinking container and holder for same
US6349844Nov 16, 1999Feb 26, 2002Betras Plastics, Inc.Drinking container and holder for same
US8361418May 11, 2011Jan 29, 2013Labcyte Inc.Method for storing fluid with closure including members with changeable relative positions and device thereof
Classifications
U.S. Classification220/296
International ClassificationB65D43/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D2543/00092, B65D2543/00555, B65D2543/00509, B65D43/0229, B65D2543/00574, B65D2543/00277, B65D2543/00537
European ClassificationB65D43/02S7D