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Publication numberUS2505790 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1950
Filing dateJul 24, 1946
Priority dateJul 24, 1946
Publication numberUS 2505790 A, US 2505790A, US-A-2505790, US2505790 A, US2505790A
InventorsErnest H Panthofer
Original AssigneePerfex Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination radiator and oil cooler
US 2505790 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2, 1950 E. H. PANTHOFER CQMBINATION RADIATOR AND OIL COOLER Filed July 24, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. ERNEST H. PANTHOFER BY W i E. H. PANTHOFER COMBINATION RADIATOR AND OIL COOLER May 2, 1950 2 Shets-Sheet 2 Filed July 2 1946 INVENTOR.

EIANEST H. PANTHOFE l Patented May 2, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE COMBINATION RADIATOR AND 011. COOLER Ernest H. Panthofer, Milwaukee, Wis., assignor to Perfex Corporation, Milwaukee, Wis., a corporation of Wisconsin Application July 2 1, i946, Serial No. 685,852

2 Claims.

This invention relates generally to radiators for logging tractors and the like are so high as to require some method of cooling the lubricating oil after circulation through the engine. Formerly this was done by mounting an oil circulating radiator core just behind the regular engine jacket fluid core. This system proved to be disadvantageous in that the air passing through the oil cooling core had relatively low heat absorbing properties, having already been raised in temperature during its passage through the jacket fluid core.

A further disadvantage, in the case of tractors and similar machinery, results from the poor circulation of air between the two cores caused by the accumulation of leaves, chaff, and bark which lodge in the small space between the jacket fluid core and the oil cooling core just behind it. To relieve these and other difficulties in simultaneously cooling the jacket fluid and lubricating oil of large internal combustion engines is the primary object of my invention.

A further object of my invention is to provide a dual fluid radiator embodying sections constructed and combined in manner afiording a compact, readily separable structure.

A further object of my invention is to provide a dual fluid radiator embodying separate sections constructed and combined in a manner afiording a durable and inexpensive construction, and in a manner presenting the compact appearance of a conventional single fluid unit.

A further object of my invention is to provide a dual fluid radiator utilizing but a single integral header plate at each end thereof and a unitary header tank structure detachably secured to each such plate.

A further object of my invention is to in general improve the header tank and/or header plate assemblies for both dual and single fluid units.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent from the following detailed description given in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which Fig. 1 is a rear view of-my improved radiator with cut-away portions showing separating walls i between the two sets of headers and the construction for circulating oil through the oil. cool ing section;

Fig. 2 is a top view of the radiator shown in Fig. 1 with portions cut away to better show the manner of'combining two sections to form in effeet a readily separable unitary structure;

Fig. 3 is a view of the right hand end of the radiator shown in Figs. 1 and 2 with a portion broken away to better show construction features of the smaller section;

Fig. 4 is a perspective view of the upper portion of a dual radiator in which the sections are not separable and are constructed with a single header plate;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged view of a portion of the structure shown in Fig. 4 with parts broken away to better show the construction;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a dual radiator having separate tank forming sections rigidly united to form a unitary header structure, as by soldering or brazing;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged view of a lower portion of the structure shown in Fig. 6 with parts broken away to show details of the joint construction;

Fig. 8 is a view similar to Fig. 7 illustrating a modified form of joint between header tank forming sections;

Fig. 9 is a perspective view of the lower portion of a dual radiator illustrating the manner of clamping a unitary header tank structure to an integral header plate; and

Fig. 10 is an enlarged view of a portion of the structure shown in Fig. 9 with parts broken away to illustrate a modified seal construction dividing the interior of the header tank into separate chambers.

In the form disclosed herein (referring to Figs. 1 to 3), my invention consists of an engine jacket fluid section it with an upper header tank II and a lower header tank 12. The core between the two header tanks i l and i2 is of the conventional fin and tube type. This allows hot water to enter the inlet I3 in the upper header tank ll, flow through the core section is where it is cooled. and flow out through the outlet I5 in the lower header tank i 2. The upper header tank I I and the lower header tank ii are held in abutting fiuid confining relation with respect to opposite ends of the core section it by means of the channel member 16 and by means of the I-shaped member ii. The channel member i5 and I-shaped member ii are attached to the above mentioned header tanks by means of bolts i 8 tightened into a threaded sleeve i9 as shown in Fig. 2. The upper header tank H is provided with a conventional filler spout and cap iii. In this connection it should be noted that core section [4 is provided with similar upper and lower header plates il which are rigidly secured to the core section in the usual manner. Plate is preferably provided with bent-over marginal edge portions or'llanges li' adapted to abut adjacent outer side wall portions of the header tank, as best shown in Fig. 1 and are held in liquid sealing relation with the header tank by means of solder, as is well known in theart.

The oil cooling section 2! consists oinn upper header tank forming structureltand' aJlower header tank forming structure 23. The core between these two header tank forming structures is also of the conventional -fin and tubetype, allowing oil flow between the upper lower header tanks. The core section'between the upper header tank forming structure 22 and lower header tankforming structure '23- is provided with similar upper and lower headerplates 43 which are rigidly secured to the core section in. the usualmanner. Plates 43 are preferably provided with bent-over marginal edge portions or flanges as adapted to abut adjacent outer side wall portions oftherheader tank, as best shown in Figs; 1 .andiB and are held in liquid sealing relation :with the; header tank by means of'solder, as is'well knownin the art. Lower header tank forming structure 23 is provided with an internal transversely extending partition memberzfi having its upper edge portion disposed withinan inverted" li shaped resilient member 25 which is preferably brazedior other wise'secured'to'the bottom or underside of lower header plate as. The sides of "the member are sprung against'oppositesides of thepartition 24, thus providing an' oil tight seal dividing, the interior of the tank 23 'into an inlet chamber. and an outlet chamber 21'. designates a group of dummy or blocked tubes which separatethe group of" active tubes con-.- necting inlet chamberQfiwith upper header tank from the group ofactivet'ubes connecting such header tank with outletchamber 27.; Chambers 26 and 21 are provided with suitable inlet and outlet connections 29 and Bil respectively. Consequently the oil oriother fluident'ers in1etchan ber 26 through the active, tubesat the right of the blocked tubes 23', flows'into' the .upperheader tank, down through the .active tubes. at thewleft o'fjthe, blocked tubes 26. and into the outlet chamber, 2l, from which itgpasses.through outlet con- 116613101) 33.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, it willbe noted that the, lower ends of dummy tubes 28 are spaced from header plate dgto form a transverseopeningreceiving, a reinforcing bar 3! abutting the top side of header plate. 41' immediately above resilient member 25. Bar 3| projects beyond opposite'sidesof thBICOlE section and is bolted at each end to the lower header tank forming structure 23' by means of bolt 3.2, look nuts and threaded lugs at.

Achannel member 351s fastened to the upper and lower. header tank forming. structures of the oil cooling radiator '21 by means'of.bolts and lugsftl, whichare extensionsoff the header tank forming, structures. Thetwo, sections Ill and ill are, iastenedtogether by bolts 38 which extend ingaor rigid fabricated:- structure including spaced tank forming. portions 54 and 55 united by a transverse wall portion 58. Structure 53 is clamped -.to header plate 52 with bottom edge portions of the side walls of tank forming portions l's-t *ancl fih; and with the wall or partition portionefi'ii abutting marginal edge portions and anintermediate portion, respectively, of header plate 52.. The securing means comprises a cap screw'fit whichextendsthrough' aligned holes in wall'portionfiand plate Errand into' inter nally threaded" holes in an 'underlying clamping bar 5"! asshown in Fig. 5;

Referring nowto Figs; Hand 7, anothertype of dual radiator construction is shown" consisting of two fluid cooling sections comprising separate up and to core sections TBand 1 separate upper header tank forming castings 1'4 and -'i5 having inlets it and l'l", respectively, and sepa rate lower header tank" formingcastings-iiil and it! having outlets 8 2 and? 83; respectively. (lore sections "58 and lfiare" provided with similar upper and lower header platesl-z, rigidly secured to thev core section "in'theusu'al manner. Plate i2 is preferably provided with bent overmarginal ed'geportions or'flanges similar to-the' header plates shown in' the preceding figures. Theupper and lowerpairs'ofheader'tank forming. castings are similar and are provided with The numeral '28 abutting sidewall portions-8 and iidsuitably united as by solderingxor brazing, as" indicated at 85. Thisconstruction utilizes asingle integral header .plate l2 disposedin abutting relation with respectto the edgesoitheside wallsof the header tank forming. castings 351 andtl. Considerable materialnna'y. he saved by" terminating the side walliifi'shoruoiside'wall B t as-shown in Fig. '7. Plate iZ-is preferably rigidly secured to the edge of walltt in any 'suitabl'ernanner; such as by soldering or brazing, as indicated at 81.

Fig. 8 iilustratesla-modified constructionwherein separate header tankifoaning. structures Bil and iii, and. aseparate.integralfheader plate. 92, are: rigidly united to form .a. unitary. structure providing twoheadertanlzssfi and. This construction i5 preferredwheresheet metal hea'der tank forming structures.-Qii anditi are employed in place of the caststructures ofthe other radiator forms so. far described.. Header plate 921 is preferably provided. with bent over. marginal edge portions (not shown) similar to the header plates previousl described. Sheet metal portionsitfl and lare somewhat resilient and-have outwardly extending flanges fifi whichere sprung againstthe header plated-2.. The-adjacent parts of the portions so and 8| are soldered as zit-87 forminga liquid -tight..-seal.between the two.=cooling sections. 'Ilhissamesolderedj oint also serves to fasten the two pertionsfill andil i te -the header plates 92. r

In. the-modified constructionshowndn Figs. 9 and lll'the cooling sections consist .oi.separate core sections m3 and W4 and a single header tank forming structure I01. Core sections I03 and I04 are provided with similar upper (not shown) and lower header plates I02 rigidly secured to the core section in the usual manner. Plate I02 is p erably provided with bent over marginal edge portions similar to the header plates previously described. The structure I01 is formed as shown in Fig. 19 with a vertically extending transverse partition IIO coacting with plate I02 to form a pair of separate adjacent header tanks or chambers I05 and I05. A liquid tight seal between the adjacent header tanks I05 and I06 is formed without the use of machined surfaces by means of an inverted U-shaped spring member disposed in capping relation with respect to the extending transverse partition H0. The legs H2 and H3 of the spring member III are curved as at I I4 and H5 and soldered into the depressions I08 and I 09. The spring member III is of such dimensions and resiliency that when the parts are assembled as shown in Fig. 19, member II I is under compression during the soldering operation, thus insuring a fluid tight seal at the curved portions III and H5. The header structure I01 is preferably clamped to header plate I02 by means of an enforcing cross bar H6 disposed between core sections I03 and I04 in engagement with the exposed upper surface of plate I02. Bar H5 is detachably secured to structure I01 by. means of a bolt II1, a lock nut H8, and an internally threaded lug II9 which is an integral part of the member I01. Chambers I05 and I06 are provided with suitable fluid outlet connections I20 and I2I respectively (shown in Fig. 9)

From the foregoing description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, it will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art that radiators constructed in accordance with this invention provide a simplified, compact, and inexpensive construction suitable for simultaneously cooling separate fluids, for example, the jacket fluid and oil of an internal combustion engine, in an emcient manner.

In addition, it should also be apparent that certain of the features of construction and certain of the combinations of parts herein disclosed are applicable to radiators other than the dual fluid type above mentioned, and that apparatus embodying the invention may vary considerably from that herein shown and described for purposes of illustration. However, it should be understood that it is not intended to limit the invention to the exact construction and/or combinations of elements shown and described herein, as various modifications within the scope of the gppenied claims may occur to persons skilled in 8 ar 1 header plate covering one end thereof, an open header tank structure secured to said header plate in fluid confining relation thereto, a partition means coacting with said header plate and tank structure to form a pair of separate fluid confining chambers communicating with the adjacent nds of separate groups of tubes, a generally U-shaped resilient member secured in capping relation to one end of said partition portion to thereby form a fluid-tight seal between said fluid confining chambers, and clamping means including a clamping bar secured to said tank structure and overlying said header plate for holding said header plate, said resilient members, and said partition end firmly in abutting relationship.

2. In a radiator of the type including a tin and tube core section provided with a tube receiving header plate covering one end thereof, an open header tank structure secured to said header plate in fluid confining relation thereto, a partition portion coacting with said header plate and tank structure to form a pair of separate fluid confining chambers communicating with the adjacent ends of separate groups of tubes, a generally U-shaped resilient member having its legs secured to opposite sides of said partition portion and held in a. capping relation to one end of said partition portion thereby forming a fluid-tight seal between said fluid confining chambers, and clamping means including a clamping bar secured to said tank structure and overlying said header plate for holding said header plate, said resilient member and said partition end firmly in abutting relationship.

ERNEST H. PAN'I'HOFER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,534,195 Walter Apr. 21, 1925 1,948,929 MacPherson Feb. 2'7, 1934 1,958,226 Askin May 8, 1934 2,146,614 Bergdoll Feb. '7, 1939 2,264,820 Young Dec. 2, 1941 2,362,985 Brown, Jr Nov. 21, 1944 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 255,331 Great Britain July 22, 1926

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Classifications
U.S. Classification165/140, 165/149, 165/144
International ClassificationF28D1/04, F01P11/08
Cooperative ClassificationF28D1/0417, F28D1/0443, F01P11/08
European ClassificationF01P11/08, F28D1/04E2, F28D1/04E4D