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Publication numberUS2505832 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1950
Filing dateMay 14, 1948
Priority dateMay 14, 1948
Publication numberUS 2505832 A, US 2505832A, US-A-2505832, US2505832 A, US2505832A
InventorsLange Anthony C
Original AssigneeLange Anthony C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Boat mooring and lifting mechanism
US 2505832 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1950 A. c. LANGE 2,505,832

BOAT MOORING AND LIFTING MECHANISM Filed May 14, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 WATER LINE INVENTOR ANTHONY C.LANGE ATTO NEYS May 2, 1950 A. c. LANGE BOAT MOORING AND LIF'TING MECHANISM 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed May 14, 1948 40 INVENTOR ANTHONY C.LANGE ATTOR NE S y 1950 A. c. LANGE 2,505,832

BOAT MOORING AND LIFTING MECHANISM Filed May 14, 1948 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR ANTHONY C. LANGE ATTORNEYS Patented May 2, 1950 NlTED STATES PATENT OFFICE BOAT MOORING AND LIFTING MECHANISM Anthony C. Lange, Milwaukee, Wis.

Application May 14, 1948, Serial No. 26,949

4 Claims. 1

This invention appertains to boat mooring devices and more particularly to a novel device for lifting and holding a boat, When not in use, above storm wave crest.

With small boats, it is customary either to drag the same ashore or up on a dock, to anchor the same beyond the shoreline, or to tie the boat to a dock. All of these methods are open to objection. For instance, when a small boat is tied to a dock, there is always the danger of the boat banging up against the dock, particularly in stormy weather.

It is, therefore, one of the primary objects of my invention to provide a portable device which can be submerged close to the shore line or alongside of a dock over which the boat can be floated and thereafter, quickly and conveniently raised out of the water, safe above wave action.

Another salient object of my invention is to provide a boat mooring device embodying a base having skids or runners for engaging the water bottom, upon which is rockably mounted a cradle for the boat, with novel means for raising and lowering the cradle and the boat out of and into the water.

A further object of my invention is to provide novel means for adjusting the angle of the base of the boat mooring device relative to the cradle, so that the base will conform to the slope of the bottom and thereby permit the cradle to be maintained parallel with the normal water level at all times.

With these and other objects in view, the invention consists in the novel construction and arrangement of parts, as will be hereinafter more specifically described and claimed, and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which drawmgs:

Figure 1 is a side elevational View of my novel boat mooring device showing the same in operative position alongside of a clock, the cradle of the mooring device being shown in its raised position holding a boat out of the water in full lines and in its lowered position in dotted lines, parts of the figure being shown broken away and in section to illustrate certain structural detail.

Figure 2 is a substantially horizontal sectional view taken on the line 22 of Figure 1, looking in the direction of the arrows illustrating the construction of the base.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary, transverse, sectional view through the moorin device taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 1 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 4 is a view similar to Figure 3 but taken so on the line 4-4 of Figure 1 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 5 is a transverse, sectional view through the base taken on the line 55 of Figure 1 looking in the direction of the arrows.

Figure 6 is a fragmentary, detail, longitudinal, sectional view illustrating a slightly modified form of mechanism for raising and lowering the cradle.

Referring to the drawings in detail, wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout the several views, the letter M generally indicates my novel boat mooring device, and the same includes a base ID, a cradle H for a boat B and the operating mechanism 2 for raising and lowering the cradle on the base.

The boat B forms no part of the present invention and can be of any preferred character or type.

The base It includes a pair of spaced parallel longitudinally extending runners or skids l3 and M. These runners or skids form means for permitting the boat mooring device to be pulled into and out of the water similar to a sleigh. The opposite ends of the runners or skids l3 and M can be slightly upturned, as at l5, if such should be desired. Any preferred materials can be utilized for the runners or skids, and as shown, the same are made from angle bars. A front arched transversely extending bracebar I6 is utilized for rigidly connecting the runners together adjacent to their forward ends. A similar rear bracebar H is also utilized, and this bracebar I1 is connected to the runners by a series or telescoping legs I 8, for a purpose which will be later set forth. The front and rear bracebars l6 and I! are ri idly connected together by a centrally disposed longitudinally extending beam l9. In the present instance, this beam has been shown to be of tubular form and welded securely to the transverse bracebars. The beam I9 carries the cradle H and the raising and lowering mechanism It, and it is desirable to maintain the longitudinal beam 19 parallel with the normal water level. The telescoping legs [8 can be adjusted so as to permit the runners l3 and M to conform to the angle or slope of the level or other water bottom. The section of the telescoping legs I8 are held in a preferred selected adjusted position by any preferred means such as bolts 20.

The cradle II for the boat includes front and rear spaced parallel cross arms 2| and 22. These cross arms extend transversely of the base and are rigidly connected by a centrally diposed longitudinally extending backbone or beam 23. The cross arms 2| and 22 can be formed from angle iron and the longitudinal connecting beam 23 is preferably formed from a pair of angle irons and a center strip with certain flanges 25 of the angle bars disposed in a horizontal plane to form a rest for the keel of the boat. Blocks 26 are rigidly secured to the cross arms 2| and 22, and these blocks have their upper faces shaped to conform to the general transverse contour of a boat bottom. The blocks have their inner ends spaced so as to permit the keel of a boat to ride between the same.

The cross arms and the longitudinal beam 23 forms a rigid top frame upon which the boat to be lifted rests. This top rigid frame is rockably connected to the base. The means employed for connecting the rigid top frame with the base includes a pair of spaced parallel front levers 21 and a pair of rear similar spaced parallel rear levers 28. The levers of each pair are rigidly connected together and braced in any preferred manner such as by the use of transversely extending spacer tubes 29. The levers 9 include telescoping sections 30 and 3|, so that the levers can be extended or shortened, as desired. A bolt 32 is utilized for each pair of levers to hold the sections thereof in a selected adjusted position.

The extreme upper ends of the front pair of levers 2! are rockably connected to the front cross arm 2! and the central beam 23 by a cross pin 33. This pin rockably extends through the central beam 23 and through depending bearing lugs 34 formed on the cross arm 2|. The rear pair of levers 2B are connected to the rear cross arm 22 in the same manner as the front pair of levers is connected to the front cross arm 2|. Hence, a cross pivot bolt 35 is employed, and this bolt extends through the central beam 23 and through depending bearing lugs 36 carried by the cross arm 22. The bolt, of course, rockably extends through the upper sections 3| of the pair of rear levers 28. The lower ends of the front pair of levers 21 are rockably connected to the rear central beam is of the base frame by means of a cross ivot bolt 31, and this bolt extends through the extreme lower ends of the levers and through bearing brackets 38 Welded to said base beam IS.

Th rear pair of levers 28 is rockably connected to the base beam l9 adjacent to its rear end by cross pivot bolt 39. and this bolt extends through the extreme lower ends of the levers 28 and through the bearing brackets 40 welded or otherwise secured to the base l9.

' Welded or otherwise secured to the inner faces of the lower sections 39 of the pair of levers 21 are cam shaped flanges 4|. These flanges extend longitudinal of the levers and cooperate with the raising and lowering mechanism I2 which will now be described.

To bring about the raising and lowering of the cradle II, I preferably employ a hydraulic lift mechanism which consists of a cylinder 42. This cylinder 42 extends longitudinally of the base frame and is securely fastened by means of cuffs 43 to the longitudinally extending base beam I9. Reciprocatively mounted in the cylinder 42 is a piston 44, and secured to the piston is a piston rod which extends outwardly of the cylinder toward the front pair of levers 21. The piston is normally urged toward the rear of the cylinder by means of an expansion spring 43 coiled about the piston rod. This spring is confined between the piston 44 and one cylinder head.

Any well known type of hydraulic pump 41 is employed for forcing liquid under pressure to the rear end of the cylinder. The pump 4'! is preferably made separate from the boat mooring device, so that the same can be placed on a dock or on shore as may be desired. As illustrated, the pump 4'! includes a hand lever 48 for operating the same. Obviously, an electric motor can be employed for this purpose should such be desired. The outlet for the pump has communieating therewith a flexible tube 49, and the tube is connected with a rigid tube 50 arranged within the central beam IQ of the base. The tube 50 communicates with the rear end of the cylinder. Obviously, upon operation of the pump, fluid will be forced into the rear end of the cylinder moving the piston 44 forwardly. When pressure is relieved, the spring will move the piston back.

The extreme forward end of the piston rod 45 carries a crosshead 5|, and this cross head carries a transversely extending shaft 52 on which is rotatably mounted a guide roller 53 which is adapted to move along the central brace beam IS. The shaft 52 also rotatably carries grooved end wheels 54 which engage the cam flanges 4| on the front pair of levers 21.

In use of my improved mooring device, the same is slid into the water at the desired location, such as alongside of a dock, and the pump .in which the base is submerged. Considering that the cradle H is in its lowered position, as shown in dotted lines in Figure l, the cross arms 2| and 22 will be submerged below the water level and preferably just about the normal position of the bottom of the boat B to be accommodated. The boat is floated over the cradle on to the cross arms 2| and 22, and the boat user then steps out on the dock and operates the pump. Fluid under pressure will force the cross head 5| forwardly against the flanges 4|, Which will swing the levers 2'! upwardly. The raising of the levers 21 will carry the levers 28, the beam 23 and the cross arms 2| and 22 therewith, and the boat will be elevated the desired distance above the water level.

When it is desired to lower the boat, the pump valve is operated to relieve the pressure in the cylinder, then the piston will be retracted by the spring 46. If the cradle is on dead center, a slightly rearward push can be given thereto by the operator.

A stop 55 can be carried by the extreme rear end of the central brace beam Is for receiving the transverse brace for the rear pair of levers, when the cradle is in its lowered position.

In Figure 6, I have illustrated a slightly modified form of elevating mechanism for the cradle. In this form the rear pair of levers 28 are extended a considerable distance below the pivot pin 39 to form lift arms 56. A bell crank 51 is rockably mounted at its angle on a pivot pin 58 carried by the central beam IQ of the base. The short arm 59 of the bell crank is pivotally connected to the piston rod 60 of a piston 6|. The piston is slidably mounted in the cylinder 62, which is in turn rigidly secured to the beam l9. An expansion spring 63 is coiled about the piston rod and is confined between a cylinder head and the piston. The rear end of the cylinder has communicating therewith a pipe 5|] for the hydraulic fluid. The long arm 59' of the bell crank carries rollers 64 for engaging the extended portions or lift arms 56 of the levers 28. When the piston BI is moved forwardly, the bell crank is actuated so as to push down on the arms 59 and bring about the elevating of the cradle.

While I have illustrated the use of my invention as a boat mooring and lifting device, obviously, the invention can be used for any purpose where it is desired to elevate or lower heavy objects. Hence the runners [3 can be eliminated and wheels or casters substituted therefor.

Changes in details may be made without departing from the spirit or the scope of my invention, but what I claim as new is:

I claim:

1. A boat mooring device comprising a rigid base including runners, said base being adapted to be submerged in a body of water below the water level, said base also including a central beam, means connecting the forward end of the beam to the runners adjacent to their forward ends, means adjustably connecting the rear end of the beam to the runners adjacent to their rear ends to adjust the angle of the runners relative to the beam, a boat receiving cradle rockably mounted on the beam and movable to a lowered position below the water level and to a raised elevated position above the water level, and means for raising and lowering the cradle,

2. A boat mooring device comprising a base frame, a cradle for a boat including a rigid top frame having cross arms for the boat, front and rear levers rockably connecting the rigid frame to the base, said front lever having a longitudinally extending cam shaped bearing flange, a cylinder secured to the base frame, a piston in said cylinder, a piston rod connected to the piston extending forwardly of the cylinder, a cross head on the rod engaging said flange, means for forcing fluid under pressure to the rear end of the cylinder against the piston, and an expansion spring normally urging the piston toward the rear end of the cylinder.

3. A boat mooring device comprising a base frame including a pair of spaced parallel, longitudinally extending skids and a longitudinally extending central beam, a cradle for a boat including a top rigid frame having cross arms for receiving the boat. front and rear pairs of levers rockably secured to the rigid frame at their upper ends and to the base frame at their lower ends, cam shaped guide flanges on the front pair of levers extending longitudinally thereof. a cylinder rigidly secured to the beam, a piston slidably mounted in the cylinder, a forwardly extending piston rod secured to the piston and extending outward of the cylinder, a cross head on the forward end of the piston rod having a guide roller engaging the central beam and operating rollers engaging the flanges on the front pair of levers, and means for operating the piston.

4. A boat mooring device comprising a base frame including a pair of spaced parallel longitudinally extending skids and a longitudinally extending central beam, a cradle for a boat includ ing a top rigid frame having cross arms for receiving the boat, front and rear pairs of levers rockably secured to the rigid frame at their upper ends and to the base frame at their lower ends, cam shaped guide flanges on the front pair of levers extending longitudinally thereof, a cylinder rigidly secured to the beam, a piston slidabiy mounted in the cylinder, a forwardly extending piston rod secured to the piston and extending outward of the cylinder, a cross head on the forward end of the piston rod having a guide roller engaging the central beam and operating rollers engaging the flanges on the front pair of levers, and means for operating the piston, said levers including telescopin sections and means for securing the sections in a selected adjusted position.

ANTHONY C. LANGE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file-of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,898,376 McCulloch Feb. 21, 1933 1,942,945 Smith Jan. 9, 1934 2,151,394 Rogers Mar. 21, 1939 2,371,461 Newell Mar. 13, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 549,562 Germany 1932

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2661751 *Apr 5, 1950Dec 8, 1953Fruit Products CorpBrine tank elevator
US2863293 *Sep 21, 1954Dec 9, 1958Noble Drilling CorpMarine drilling rig
US2963176 *Oct 10, 1956Dec 6, 1960Willard SmithBoat rasier
US2997852 *Dec 30, 1954Aug 29, 1961De Long CorpApparatus and method for reecting a supporting structure over a body of water
US3021965 *Nov 6, 1959Feb 20, 1962Harvey Edward EBoat lift
US3051340 *Aug 10, 1959Aug 28, 1962Howard L ElyVehicle hoist
US3077742 *Nov 14, 1960Feb 19, 1963Phillip BrownBoat house dry dock
US3139732 *May 5, 1961Jul 7, 1964Thompson Walter ABoat stabilizing and lifting device
US3177668 *May 15, 1961Apr 13, 1965Hydraulic Unit Specialities CoLift type mooring cradle for small boats
US3220196 *Feb 12, 1963Nov 30, 1965Harry W SchollardBoat dock
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Classifications
U.S. Classification405/3, 114/48, 187/211
International ClassificationB63C3/06, B63C3/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63C3/06
European ClassificationB63C3/06