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Publication numberUS2506448 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1950
Filing dateMar 15, 1945
Priority dateMar 15, 1945
Publication numberUS 2506448 A, US 2506448A, US-A-2506448, US2506448 A, US2506448A
InventorsGregor Fred
Original AssigneeNorbert Roth
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Temperature and humidity controlled refrigerating apparatus
US 2506448 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2, 1950 F. GREGOR TEMPERATURE AND HUMIDITY CONTROLLED REFRIGERATING APPARATUS Filed March 15, 1945 INVENTOR fkzo GREGOR ATTORN I E s.

Patented May 2, 1950 TEMlERATURE AND HUMID TROLLED REFBIGERATING APPARA- TUS ITY CON- Fred Gregor, Brookly N. Y., asslgnor of one-half to Norbert Roth, Forest Hills, N. Y.

Application March 15, 1945, Serial No. 582,834

8 Claims. (CL 62-114) This invention relates to refrigerating apparatus. More particularly the invention deals with means for controlling humidity and circulation of air through apparatus of this type and kind in maintaining a desired atmosphere within the refrigerating apparatus for any purpose, and particularly in the processing of chocolate candies. The novel features of the invention will be best understood from the following description when taken together with the accompanying drawing, in which certain embodiments of the invention are disclosed, and in which the separate parts are designated by suitable reference characters in each of the views, and in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view diagrammatically illustrating a refrigerating apparatus showing part of the apparatus in open position; and r Fig. 2 is a section on the line 2-2- of Fig. 1 on an enlarged scale diagrammatically showing the general arrangement of the mechanism of th refrigerator.

In illustrating one adaptation and use of my invention, I have shown in the accompanying drawing the box, casing, or cabinet l of a refrigerator. The cabinet In is of double walled construction throughout, in other words, comprises inner and outer sheets II and I2 between which is a body of insulation 13, as will clearly appear from the sectional-illustration of Fig. 2.

Considering Fig. 1, it will appear that the front wallhas a large door opening l4 adapted to be closed by a double walled door 15 which constitutes part of a truck or tray carrying member 16 which may also be termed a supplemental cabinet. The member I6 is mounted on castors or rollers H to facilitate free movement overa floor or other supporting surface which is indicated at 18. The cabinet 10 is so mounted in connection with the surface l8 as to dispose the upper surface is of the bottom wall of the cabinet in alinement with the surface l8, as will clearly appear from a considerationof Figs. 1 and 2 of the drawing. It will thus be apparent that the 7 member l6 may be moved into and out of the refrigerator cabinet without distortion to the member l6, thus maintaining a plurality of candy supporting trays 20 in horizontal position at all times in the member I61 I The trays 20 are supported on cleats 2i and 22 arranged upon the inner surface of the cover l5 and the inner surface of the inner wall 23 of the member ii. The member I6 is opengat both sides so that the trays 20 are free to slide onto the cleats 2 l and 22 from either side of the memthe member I! into position at a loading station, these trays may he slid into the member from one side while the other trays are discharged from the opposite side. The trays 20 may, in some uses, simply be shelves upon which articles can be supported.

Within the cabinet are upper and lower sup- 7 plemental top wall portions .24 and 25, these portions dividing the upper closed end 28 of the cabinet into two transverse chambers 21 and 28 in communication with opposite sides of the cabinet, as seen at 29 and 30. The wall forms the top of the refrigerating chamber 3| of the cabinet into which the member I6 is free to pass through the opening l4. The chamber 3| is also defined by supplemental side walls 32 and 33 which form vertical circulating passages 34 and 35 at opposite sides of the cabinet and in'alinement with the passages 29 and respectively.

The walls 32 and 33 are both provided with vertically spaced longitudinal circulating passages 36 and 31. Pivoted to the wall 33 adjacent each of the passages '31 are adjustable vanes 38 adapted to control the circulatin passages 31 and regulating the flow of air from the passage into the chamber 3|. Other vanes 38a are adjustably pivoted to the wall 32 adjacent the assages 36 and further control circulation through the chamber 3| and out through the passages, 36 and 34.

Supported in the chamber 28 between the walls 24 and 25 is an electric motor 39 actuating a fan or blower 40 which is exposed at one side of refrigerating coils 4|. At the other side of these coils, and preferably in spaced relation thereto is supported an open work heating unit 42 through which air blown around the coils 4| is adapted to pass into the passages 30 and '35 or either of them. Supported in the chamber 28 adjacent the passages 30 and 35 is a damper or butterfly control 43 pivotally supported, as seen at 44, and manually or otherwise operated or adjusted to control the size of the discharges from the chamber 28 into the passages illl and 35 in controlling the circulation of .air through the apparatus and particularly in regulating the temperature of this, air. The damper or' butterfly 43 is of sufficient size to completely shut of! either of the passages 30 and 35, and may be adjusted to relatively increase or decrease the size of these passages at least where they communicate with the chamber28, it being understood in this connection that the passage 35 is a long passageextending the full height of that .ber. It will thus be apparent that by bringing 36 part of the cabinet occupied by the chamber 3|.

' paratus, but more in general Extending from the refrigerating coils 4| is a condensate line 45 which extends out through one wall of the cabinet ID, as indicated at 46. Also passed through the walls of the cabinet are communications 41 and 48, the communication 41 leading to a thermostat bulb 49, whereas the communication 48 extends to a humidostat device 54, both of the latter controls being located in the upper portion of the chamber 34. These controls 49 and 53 may be in direct operative engagement with the automatic controls on the damper or butterfly 43, as well as any other part of the refrigerating apparatus as a whole in controlling the operation of the apparatus. At the same time, they will also be in operative connection with the refrigerating unit as in other refrigerating apparatus and may also be employed to control operation of the electric heater 42.

In the processing of candy, and particularly humidity of the atmosphere exposed to the candy. From experience it has been found that best results are accomplished by maintaining the chocolate at a substantially fixed temperature and in a relatively dry atmosphere throughout the setting period in order to produce the most desirable results in the resulting candy. That is to say, an even hardening or setting of the chocolate throughout the thickness of the chocolate and to obviate what might be regarded as case or surface'hardening, usually experienced in excessive chilling or too quick setting 0' the chocolate. Furthermore, an apparatus 0. .18 kind under consideration may be so regulated and controlled that the temperature to which the candy is subjected during the setting or hardening process can be varied during the processing of a single batch of candy or from time to time in treatment of different batches of candy having different consistencies or properties. Considerable difficulties have also been experienced in using refrigeration apparatus of the conventional construction from the standpoint of time factor involved in placing a series of trays in an open refrigerator and the loss of temperature by virtue of this delay in' first removing the processed trays and in the insertion of new trays of candy for further processing.

With my present construction, a number of the tray units'or members l6 can be employed in conjunction with each cabinet, and assemblages of these units can be made so that in the removal of one processed unit from the cabinet, another assembled unit may be immediately inserted into the cabinet, thus maintaining high efllciency in the operation of the cabinet and minimizing on the losses in the operation of the refrigerating apparatus. Suitable means may be provided for sealing the door II of the unit on the outer surface of the cabinet, but as such devices form no specific part of my present invention, they are 4 not shown. In fact, the entire illustration in the accompanying drawing is somewhat diagrammatic, as I am not concerned with the specific structural details of the several parts of the aparrangement, which is clearly illustrated. I

By providing the independent adjustable vanes 33-38a, circulation of heated air from the passage 35 into the chamber 3| may be regulated so as to provide a good distribution of the air through the entire height of the unit. This air will pass through the passages 31, across the trays supported in the member l6, then out through the passages 33 into the passage 34 and then into the chamber 23. It is then recirculated by the fan or blower 30 through the coils 4| and heater 42. The damper or butterfly 43 controls the volume of air circulated into the passage 35. The balance of this air extends through the passage 30 into the chamber 21 and then back into the chamber 28 through the passage 33 and becomes a recirculated current of air which will maintain high efliciency in operation of the apparatus. In other words, assuming the damper or butterfly 43 is manually or automatically set at a position similar to that shown in Fig. 2 where a comparatively small discharge is provided at 3| into the passage 33 and a large discharge 32 is provided into the recirculating chamber 21. It will then be apparent that the apparatus is calling for. a minimum amount of heated air to be circulated through the chamber 3| for proper functioning of the apparatus. In this way, and from time to time, the heating unit as at 42 may actually be out off. On the other hand, when a large volume of heated air is required for supply to the passage 35, the butterfly 43 may be moved into the position to completely shut off the passage 30 so that all of the heated air circulated through the heater 42 will be directed into the passage 35 and the chamber 3|.

It will be understood that the invention as diagrammaticalliy illustrated is intended for the treatmentjor processing of chocolate candies. However, "in other instances, question of temperature may be varied from that of supplying or circulating hot air to that of supplying or circu lating cold air, in which event, the heater-'42 may be entirely dispensed with or rendered inoperative or an auxiliary or booster cooling unit employed. In still other instances, the principle of forced air circulation through a refrigerating apparatus or cooling unit of any type or kind may be employed. In most apparatus of this kind, and particularly refrigerator boxes or cabinets, circulation is dependent entirely upon normal circulation of hot and cold air. Providing the forced draft circulation according to the principles illustrated in Fig. 1, and in distributing this circulation throughout the entire area of the refrigerating chamber or compartment of the apparatus will produce a more highly emcient unit and will also provide throughout the chamber 3| a more even distribution of temperature for the processing or preservation of products located in different parts of the chamber of the apparatus.

It will also be understood that where independent or variable temperatures are required in different parts of a storage chamber, these may be further controlled by the adjustable vanes 38-4811 to intensify or diminish the temperature of the forced circulated air through the storage chamber. One of the other distinctive features of my invention resides in the mounting of a refrigerating apparatus in connection with a floor or other supporting surface so as to enable the truck or carrier member to maintain a non-tilted horizontal position at all times. This is particumental in the processing stage, particularly before setting and hardening in the refrigerating apparatus.

Having fully described my invention, --whatI said cabinet having a large refrigerating chamber therein defined by top and side walls spaced from the cabinet walls and forming in conjunction therewith intercommunicating circulating passages at the top and sides of the cabinet,

' means comprising vertically spaced and horizontally alined passages in opposed side walls of said chamber placing the side wall passages in communication with said chamber at vertically spaced intervals, means providing forced circulation of air from the upper passage downwardly through one of the side passages across said chamber and upwardly through the other side passage in the operation of the apparatus, adjustable means controlling the intake of air into the chamber through the vertically spaced passages at the intake side of the cabinet, other means controlling the volume of air introduced into the first named intake side passage, and said last named means also controllingrecirculation of air through said top circulating passage.

2. A refrigerating apparatus of the class described comprising an insulated walled cabinet, said cabinet having a large refrigerating chamber therein defined by top and side walls spaced from the cabinet walls and forming in conjunction therewith intercommunicating circulating passages at the top and sides of the cabinet, means comprising vertically spaced and horizontally alined passages in opposed side walls of said chamber placing the side wall passages in communication with, said chamber at vertically spaced intervals, means providing forced circulation of air from the upper passage downwardly through one of the side passages across said chamber and upwardly through the other side passage in the operation of the apparatus, adjustable means controlling the intake of air into the chamber through the vertically spaced passages at the intake side of the cabinet, other means controlling the volume of air introduced into the first named intake side passage, said last named means also controlling recirculation of air through said top circulating passage, and hot and cold temperature control means arranged in the top passage and through which a forced circulated air is adapted to pass.

3. A refrigerating apparatus of the class described comprising an insulated walled cabinet, said cabinet having a large refrigerating chamber therein defined by top and side walls spaced from the cabinet walls and forming in conjunction therewith intercommunicating circulating passages at the top and sides of the cabinet, means comprising vertically spaced and horizontally alined passages inopposed side walls of said chamber placing the side wall passages in communication with said chamber at vertically spaced intervals, means providing forced circulation of air from the upper passage downwardly through one of the side passages across said chamber and upwardly through the other side passage in the operation of the apparatus, ad

justable means controlling the intake of air into the chamber through the vertically spaced passages at the intake side of the cabinet, other means controlling the volume of air introduced into the first named intake side passage, said last,named means also controlling recirculation of air through said top circulating passage, hot and cold temperature control means arranged in the top passage and through which a forced circulated air is adapted to pass, and a thermostat control in said chamber.

4. A refrigerating apparatus of the class described comprising an insulated walled cabinet, said cabinet having a large refrigerating chamber therein defined by top and side walls spaced from the cabinet walls and forming in conjunction therewith intercommunicating circulatin passages at the top and sides of the cabinet, means comprising vertically spaced and horizontally alined passages in opposed side walls of said chamber placing the side wall passages in communication with said chamber at vertically spaced intervals, means providing forced circulation of air from the upper passage downwardly through one of the side passages across said chamber and upwardly through the other side passage in the operation of the apparatus, adjustable means controlling the intake of air into the chamber through the vertically spaced passages at the intake side of the cabinet, other means controlling the volume of air introduced into the first named intake side passage, said last named means also controlling recirculation of air through said top circulating passage, hot and cold temperature control means arranged in the top passage and through which'a forced circulated air is adapted to pass, a thermostat control in said chamber, and a humidostat control in said chamber.

5. A refrigerating apparatus of the class described comprising an insulated walled cabinet, said cabinet having a large refrigerating chamber therein defined by top and side walls spaced from the cabinet walls and forming in conjunction therewith intercommunicating circulating passages at the top and sides of the cabinet, means comprising vertically spaced and horizontally alined passages in opposed side walls of said chamber placing the side wall passages in communication with said chamber at vertically spaced intervals, means providing forced circulation of air from the upper passage downwardly through one of the side passages across said chamber and upwardly through the other side passage in the operation of the apparatus, adjustable means controlling the intake of air into the chamber through the vertically spaced passages at the intake side of the cabinet, other means controlling the volume of air introduced into the first named intake side passage, said last named means also controlling recirculation of air through said top circulating passage, hot and cold temperature control means arranged in the top passage and through which a forced circulated air is adapted to pass, and a humidostat control in said chamber.

6. A refrigerating apparatus of the class described comprising an insulated walled cabinet, said cabinet having a large refrigerating chamber therein defined by top and side walls spaced from the cabinet walls and forming in conjunction therewith intercommunicating circulating passages at the top and sides of the cabinet, means comprising vertically spaced and horizontally alined passages in opposed side walls of chamber and upwardly through the other side in the operation of the apparatus, admeans controlling the intake of air into passage iustable 7 the chamber through the vertically spaced passages at the intake side of the cabinet, other means controlling the volume of air introduced into the first named intake sidepassage, said last named means also controlling recirculation of air through said top circulating passage, hot and cold temperature control means arranged in the top passage and through which a forced circulated air is adapted to pass, the front of the cabinet having a large opening extending into 1 the chamber of the cabinet, and a portable carrier including a door closure movable through said opening into the chamber of the cabinet.

7. A refrigerating apparatus of the class described comprising an insulated walled cabinet, said cabinet having a large refrigerating chamber therein defined by top and side walls spaced from the cabinet walls and forming in conjunction therewith intercommunicating circulating passages at the top and sides of the cabinet,

means comprising vertically spaced and hori zontally alined passages in opposed side walls of said chamber placing the side wall passages in communication with said chamber at vertically spaced intervals, means providing forced circulatlon of air from the upper passage downwardly through one of the side passages across said chamber and upwardly through the other side passage in the operation of the apparatus, adjustable means controlling the intake of air into the chamber through the vertically spaced passages at the intake side of the cabinet, other means controlling the volume of air introduced into the first named intake side passage, said last named means also controlling recirculation 35 of air through said top circulating passage, 9. temperature control unit arranged in the top passage and through which a forced circulated air is adapted to pass, the front of the cabinet having alarge opening extending into the chamopening providing access to said chamber, the

bottom wall oi said chamber and door opening being flush with a surface upon which the cabinet is arranged, a wheeled carrier movable over said surface for free movement into and out of the chamber of said cabinet through said door spacing. said wheeled carrierincluding a door forming a closure for the opening of said cabinet,

the wheels of said carrier being all arranged inwardly of said door, said carrier being open at opposite sides, and vertically spaced means in the carrier for supporting a pluralityof trays therein.

FRED GREGOR.

REFERENCES CITED ifhe following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 191,729 Thompson-ct a1 June 5, 1877 657,929 Feldkircher Sept. 18, 1900 1,667,315 Harris Apr. 24, 1928 1,859,613 Bailey May 24, 1932 2,060,065 Gill et a1 Nov. 10, 1936 2,259,007 Story et a1 Oct. 14, 1941 2,268,769 Newton Jan. 6, 1942 2,382,084 Mathews Aug. 14, 1945

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US2703581 *Oct 16, 1953Mar 8, 1955Culhane Vernon CDishwasher
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Classifications
U.S. Classification62/159, 186/45, 62/377, 62/237, 62/176.6, 62/382, 62/179, 62/186, 312/317.2, 62/414, 62/408
International ClassificationF25D17/06, F25D25/00
Cooperative ClassificationF25D2317/04131, F25D17/06, F25D2317/0664, F25D2400/20, F25D25/00
European ClassificationF25D25/00, F25D17/06