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Publication numberUS2506475 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1950
Filing dateFeb 27, 1946
Priority dateFeb 27, 1946
Publication numberUS 2506475 A, US 2506475A, US-A-2506475, US2506475 A, US2506475A
InventorsEllis Traub
Original AssigneeEllis Traub
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Renewable dart target
US 2506475 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

' sogg ELLIS TRAUB M y 2, 1950 E. TRAUB 2,506,475

RENEWABLE DART TARGET Filed Feb. 2'7; 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 2A l ,2? 1 i a II May 2, 1950 E. TRAUB RENEWABLE DART TARGET Filed Feb. 27, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 E1. L18 TRAUB Patented May 2, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE RENEWABLE DART TARGET Ellis Traub, Worcester, Mass.

Application February 27, 1946, Serial No. 650,557

permanently wired to the indicating devices, so 10 that it has not been feasible or convenient to replace such panels when they have become disfigured or otherwise damaged by continued use.

It is accordingly one object of the invention to 9 Claims. (Cl. 273102.2)

provide an indicating target which will be comparatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture.

It is a further object of the invention to provide an indicating target having a comparatively inexpensive target panel which may be readily and quickly replaced with a new panel when desired.

It is a further object of the invention to provide an improved dart-receiving panel for an indicating target, which will not damage the darts in any way, and which can be manufactured at a comparatively low cost.

With these and other objects in view, as will be apparent to those skilled in the art, the invention resides in the combination of parts set forth in the specification and covered by the claims appended hereto.

Referring to the drawing illustrating one embodiment of the invention, and in which like reference numerals indicate like parts:

Fig. 1 is a front elevation of a target for darts;

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1, but with the indicator panel and the target panel removed from the apparatus;

Fig. 3 is a section taken on the line 33 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a section taken on the line 44' of Fig. 2;

Fig. 5 is a section taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the indicator panel;

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the target panel;

Fig. 8 is a section, on an enlarged scale, taken on the line 8--8 of Fig. '7.

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary view of the back of the target panel;

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary section taken on the line l0lt| of Fig. 8;

Fig. 11 is a view similar to Fig. 8, but showing a slight modification; and

Fig. 12 is a side elevation of a dart.

The embodiment illustrated comprises a hollow rectangular frame E5 of a suitable material, such as wood, the height of the frame somewhat exceeding its width. The interior of the frame is divided into an upper compartment [6 and a lower compartment H by means of a transverse horizontal frame member IQ of wood or the like, the lower compartment being substantially square. To the back of the frame there is secured a vertical rectangular plate 20, preferably of metal, such as tin-plated sheet steel, which forms the rear wall of both the compartments. The upper compartment it is closed at the front by a rectangular panel 2!, and the lower com-' partment I1 is closed at the front by a substantially square target panel 23. Both of these panels are readily removable, and for this purpose the frame I 5 and the transverse member l9 are provided with grooves 24 (Figs. 3 and 4) which slidably receive the edges of the panels. The right hand member of the frame has a slot 25 (Fig. 4) in the plane of the grooves, so that the panels may be removed and replaced through this slot, as indicated by the broken lines at the right of Fig. 1. Preferably a transverse horizontal frame member 26 extends across the central portion of the lower compartment IT, with its front edge in a common plane with the rear edges of the grooves 24.

The upper panel 2| is preferably made of a comparatively soft material, such as cardboard, which will not damage a dart accidentally striking the panel, and it is sufliciently thick to prevent complete penetration by a dart. This panel is provided with a horizontal row of openings 21 (five being shown) which are covered by a sheet 28 of a suitable transparent or translucent material applied to the rear surface of the panel. This sheet is preferably of sufficient strength and thickness to prevent penetration or shattering by a poorly aimed dart, and it carries various numerals, which serve to indicate the scoring values of different areas of the target panel 23.

Within the upper compartment there is provided a series of electric lamp bulbs 30, one for each of the panel openings 21. Each bulb is mounted in a socket formed in an ear 3| struck up from the rear plate 28, the center contacts of the bulbs engaging metal contacts 32 mounted chamber in registration with the corresponding opening 21. These walls 3'3 may be conveniently made from a single strip of tin-plated sheet steel, suitably secured to the frame member l9. It will be apparent that the walls 34 not only conline the light from each bulb to the corresponding opening 21, but they also serve as light reflectors. In addition to the lamp bulbs 38, there is provided a further electrical signal in the form of a buzzer or bell 55 (Fig. 2) mounted on the plate 20 within the lower compartment IT, with one of its terminals 36 connected to the said plate.

The various signals are energized in accordance with the location of darts which penetrate the target panel 23. For this purpose 'a' horizontal strip 31 of insulating material is mounted on the rear plate 20 adjacent the crosse nember 26. On this strip 3'! there are mounted five spring contacts 38, a spring contact 39, and a spring contact 46. The contacts are all made frorn thin yieldable sheet metal, and as shown in Eig. they project (wheniree) slightlyin front of the member 25. Thecontac'ts 3B are respectively connected to the five contacts 32 by'means of insulated wires arena the contact 39 is connected to the'terrninal .43 of the buzzer 35 by an insulated .wire 44. The contact 40 neon,- n'ectedbyan insulated wire 46 to a spring contact l llmountjed on the lower cross inember of the" frame i; Electrical en r y forjopferation pf the indicating system' is prOVided by a pair er dry cellba'tt'eri'es 69 mounted in end-to-end er series arrangement and supported byclips 5|] struck up from the rear plate '20; The base .Of ene battery engages the contact 41, while the central terminal of the other battery engages a contact 5i struck up from the rear plate 20. Obv'ionsly, a low voltage transformer or other suitable seurjeeer low veneee current maybe used in place of the batteries. Itfw'ill be clear that if the -contazzt 4!] is connected by some means to the contact 3972i circuit will be completed to cnergirethe buzzer 35, and if the contact 40 is iccnnectedby somemeans to one of the contacts a circuit will be completed to energize the corresponding bulb 3ft. su'ch'completion of ciris brought 'abdut by the metal point of a dart in conjunction with the target panel 23, as will now be described.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 7, the front surface ofthe panel 23isprinted' or otherwise marked with a central circle or 'bulFs-ey'e 53' surrounded by fivesub'stantially contiguous circular bands 54, which'may carrydifferent scoring indicia. The buns-eye 5,3 and bands, form definite target areas, which prer rab yare colored in a contrasting manner .as' indicated by the line shading the" draw ngs. While this circular, arran e l gnl' qftargetareas isfpiief erred, ether shapes and arr ngements be employed ifdesired. Referringnowf t Fi Ja it will be seen that the get'p "e1 23 is a laminated structure with several difierent layers: The front surface of the panel, on which the target'areas 5 3E 31 ,4 appear, is formed by asht'fifi er paper or the like" Be m ld the paper there is provided'a "sheet 57 of a thin metal 'foil, such as aluminum foil, andbehing-1 this there i'sf'pro'vide'd a sheet 58 ofcar'd-r T5 9 id. or other relatively soft electrical insulating In ial 'Whichwill be readily piercedby' the metalpoint of adart. Thenext layer. at the reanofthe' sh'eetES isfor'rne'd by a central circle Bil and a seriesof concentric fiat'circular bands rresponding closely 'in size and position to rel he wage bares m s a These parts 60 and 5! are formed of a thin metal foil, such as aluminum foil, and as best shown in Fig. 10, they are slightly spaced from one another throughout their entire perimeters. Behind the parts 66 and 5! there is provided a layer 63 of cardboard or other relatively soft electrical insulating material, this layer preferabl being of sufiicient thickness to prevent complete penetration by a dart. It will be understood that the thickness of the paper 55 and of the metal foil is necessarily greatly exaggerated in Fig. 8. Each of the metal foil bodies is connected by a suitable electrical conductor to a contact on the rear surface of the cardboard layer =33. For this purpose I may use narrow strips of metal foil which pass through slits in the cardboard 63.

While these strips may be integral with the foil bodies,'they are preferably made from separate pieces. As shown, a foil strip 65 is connected to the central foil member 69, and a separate foil strip 55 is connected to each of the .foil members 51. Also, a f'cil stripffi'l'iis 'connected to the'foil sheet 5 1. These various strips provide a horijzentafrow of contacts on' the rear face of the target panel and in position to register at ass ly with the springbontacts 38, 39 and s8 N the" i-i'ame l5. Theseve'ral layersforin- .e heta ee 'pa 3 may be hel o e si itable adhesive to provide a unitary strucure.

11 there is shown a slightly modified construction for'the target panel, in which the foil sheet}? "is placed directly behind the cardboard'layer 58 (instead of in front thereof), while page n me bers 6!! and "e a pi 'ee'd "directly in meter the 1a'yer' 5a (insteadof behind thesiarne). In other words, the positions of the sheet E'L'on the 'ohehandfand of themembers' 6,0 and 61, on the 'other' hand, have simply been exchanged.

d0 Thisconstruction requires that narrow openings 10' be proyided in the foil sheet 57, so that the strips 65 and 65 may pass therethrough without making contact with'thesheet'. In Fig'. 12 there is shown a dartof a suitable construction for use sgvith my target. This dart comprises an elongated body '{2 of wood or the urea sharp metal point it at the front end of 1 111 5 d?) fin g i l fi fi ,4 at t e rea e p fi pgyw .7, Whi1e"crtain parts have been described as formed of metal foil, which is the preferredcon str'tt ictibn, other thin metal structures of an equivalenthature may be employed. For example, it would be feasible to use afine' mesh wire screen instead or metal on. The invention merely reguires'a she'etwhich will'iconduct'electric" and which is readily penetrated bythe metal p'oi'nt'ls of the dart, so that the dart 'meyeempieteen electrical "circuit and energize the proper signal. ns e i n o the in nt n w l n w ear parent from"the above disclosure. "With the panels 2! and 23 in place within the frame 15, the contacts 66" on the rear 'of'the target panel 23 will respectively engage the spring contacts 38, whileth contacts 65 enasi will respectively en-, gage the spring contacts 39 and 4D. The darts will bethrown" into the target panel 23 from a suitable distance, and "as each dart strikesone of the target areas 53 or 55, the metal point 73 of the dart will penetrate sufficiently to establish an electrical contact between the 'foil sheet 51 and the particular foil member. or {ii which corresponds to the pierced target area. Thus, if the'dart registers a bullfs ey'e the area tithe dart Point, wi l e ns e1 eh-stri t; e 'i eiptb t the foil parts 60 and 51. This will complete a circuit from the batteries 49 through the contact 5|, the plate 20, the terminal 36, the buzzer 35, the terminal 43, the wire 44, the spring contact 39, the panel contact 65, the foil part 60, the dart point 13, the foil sheet 51', the panel contact 67,

the spring contact 56, the wire 46, the spring contact 41, and thus back to the batteries 49. The resultant current flow will actuate the buzzer 35. If the dart enters one of the annular target areas 54 (say the one marked 5), it will form an electrical contact between the corresponding foil part 6! and the foil sheet 5'5. This will complete a circuit from the batteries d9 through the contact 5!, the plate 253, one ear 3!, the corresponding bulb 36, contact 32, wire 42, spring contact 38, and panel contact 66, the pierced foil part 6|, the dart point 13, the foil sheet 51, the panel contact 61, the spring contact 49, the wire 45, the spring contact 47, and thus back to the batteries 49. The resultant current flow will light the bulb 36 behind the numeral 5 in the panel 2|, the light being reflected from the back plate 20, as Well as from the metal wall 34, so that it will be clearly evident to the participants in the game just what score has been made. The frame member 26 engages the rear surface of the target panel and supports it firmly against the shock of each dart as it strikes the panel. This prevents the impact of the darts from shaking previously thrown darts from the panel.

The target panel 23 is comparatively simple and inexpensive to manufacture, and includes nothing which can injure the points of the darts. There are no permanent electrical wiring connections between the panel and the indicating devices. Consequently when a panel becomes badly worn from long use, it may be easily withdrawn through the slot 25 and replaced by a new panel. The space behind the target panel provides a very convenient place to store the darts when not in use. The sliding panels provide ready access to the batteries and bulbs to facilitate replacement when necessary.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A target for darts or the like comprising a frame, a target panel mounted on the frame and readily removable therefrom, the panel including two thin metal structures separated by electrical insulating material and arranged to be pierced and electrically connected by the metal point of a dart, an electric signal mounted on the frame, two contacts mounted on the frame and in circuit with the signal, and two contacts on the panel electrically connected to the respective metal structures, the panel contacts engaging the respective frame contacts automatically upon mounting the panel on the frame.

2. A target for darts or the like comprising a frame, a target panel mounted on the frame and readily removable therefrom, the panel including two thin metal structures separated by electrical insulating material and arranged to be pierced and electrically connected by the metal point of a dart, an electric signal mounted on the frame, two yieldable spring contacts on the frame and in circuit with the signal, and two contacts on the panel electrically connected to the respective metal structures, the panel contacts engaging the respective spring contacts auto-- matically upon mounting the panel on the frame.

3. A target for darts or the like comprising a frame having grooves, a flat target panel arranged to slide edgewise into position in the frame with the edges of the panel engaging th grooves, the panel including two thin metal structures separated by electrical insulating material and arranged to be pierced and electrically connected by the metal point of a dart, an electric signal mounted on the frame, two yieldable spring contacts mounted on the frame and in circuit with the signal, and two contacts on the rear surface of the panel electrically connected to the respective metal structures, the panel contacts engaging the respective spring contacts automatically as the panel slides into place in the frame.

4. A target for darts or the like comprising a frame, a fiat target panel mounted on the frame and readily removable therefrom, the front face of the panel being marked to designate a plurality of target areas, the panel including two layers of thin metal separated by electrical insulating material, one layer being divided into a plurality of electrically insulated parts corresponding in shape and position to the respective target areas and the other layer being continuous throughout all the target areas, the construction being such that the metal point of a dart thrown into a given target area will pierce and electrically connect the corresponding metal layer part with the continuous metal layer, a plurality of electric signals mounted on the frame, a contact mounted on the frame and common to all the signals, a plurality of additional contacts mounted on the frame and in circuit with the respective signals, a contact on the panel electrically connected to the continuous metal layer and arranged to engage the said common contact automatically as the panel is placed in the frame, and a plurality of contacts on the panel electrically connected respectively to the parts of the said divided layer and arranged to engage respectively the said additional contacts automatically as the panel is placed in the frame.

5. A target for darts or the like comprising a frame, a fiat target panel mounted on the frame and readily removable therefrom, the front face of the panel being marked to designate a central circular bull's-eye surrounded by substantially contiguous circular bands to form definite target areas, the panel including two layers of thin metal separated by electrical insulating material, one layer being divided into a plurality of slightly separated parts corresponding in shape and position to the respective target areas and the other layer being continuous throughout all the target areas, the construction being such that the metal point of a dart thrown into a given target area will pierce and electrically connect the corresponding metal layer part with the continuous metal layer, a plurality of electric signals mounted on the frame, a contact mounted on the frame and common to all the signals, a plurality of additional contacts mounted on the frame and in circuit with the respective signals, a contact on the panel electrically connected to the continuous metal layer and arranged to engage the said common contact automatically as the panel is placed in the frame, and a plurality of contacts on the panel electrically connected respectively to the parts of the said divided layer and arranged to engage respectively the said additional contacts automatically as the panel is placed in the frame.

6. A target for darts or the like comprising a frame, a plate of sheet metal secured to the rear of the frame, a target panel mounted on the front of the frame and including two thin metal structures separated by electricalinsulating material and arranged to be pierced and electrically connected by the metal point of a dart, and an electric signal connected in a circuit with the said metal structures, the sheet metal plate forming a portion of the said circuit.

'7. A target for darts or the like comprising a frame, a plate of sheet metal secured to the rear of the frame, an ear struck up from the said sheet and shaped to provide a socket, an electric lam-p bulb mounted in the socket, a target panel mounted on the front of the frame and including two thin metal structures separated by electrical insulating material and arranged to be pierced and electrically connected by the metal point of a dart, and means connecting the lamp bulb in a circuit with the said metal structures, the sheet metal plate and ear forming a portion of the said circuit.

8. As an article of manufacture, a target panel for an electrically indicating target for darts or the like in the form of a laminated structure comprising a comparatively thick rear layer of relatively soft electrical insulating material, a layer of thin metal in front of the rear layer, a layer of relatively soft electrical insulating material in front of the metal layer, a layer of thin metal in front of the last mentioned insulating layer, a thin front layer of paper or the like marked to indicate definite target areas, one of the metal layers being divided into separate parts correspending in shape and position to the respective target areas, a plurality of contacts on the rear surface of the said thick rear layer electricall'y connected respectively to the parts of the divided metal layer, and a contact on the rear surface of the said thick rear layer electrically connected to the other metal layer, all the said layers being fastened to one another to pro vide a unitary structure, and the metal layers a '8 being such as to be readily pierced and electri cally connected by the metal point of a dart.

9. As an article of manufacture, a target panel for an electrically indicating target for darts or the like in the form of a laminated structure comprising a comparatively thick rear layer of relatively soft electrical insulating material, a layer of thin metal in front of the rear layer, a layer of relatively soft electrical insulating material in front of the metal layer, a layer of thin metal in front of the last mentioned insulating layer, a thin front layer of paper or the like marked to indicate definite target areas, one of the metal layers being divided into separate parts corresponding in shape and position to the respective target areas, a plurality of contacts on the panel electrically connected respectively to the parts of the divided metal layer, and a contact on the panel electrically connected to the other metal layer, all the said layers being fastened to one another to provide a unitary structure, and the metal layers being such as to be readily pierced and electrically connected by the metal point of a dart.

ELLIS TRAUB.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 815,117 Peters Mar. 3, 1906 2,168,644 Browning Aug. 8, 1939 2,200,456 Shultz May 14, 1940 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 439,172 Great Britain Nov. 26, 1935 792,692 France Oct. 28 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US815117 *Apr 5, 1904Mar 13, 1906George Armstrong PetersSelf-registering electrically-operated sectional target
US2168644 *Oct 14, 1936Aug 8, 1939Browning Albert ETarget indicating game
US2200456 *Jun 3, 1938May 14, 1940Clarence R ShultzCombination game apparatus
FR792692A * Title not available
GB439172A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2629599 *Aug 14, 1950Feb 24, 1953Gaut Robert LElectrically indicating dart game board
US2693959 *Jan 31, 1952Nov 9, 1954Ross Jr Alexander DTarget apparatus with electrical indicator
US2743106 *Jun 12, 1953Apr 24, 1956Carl K SchelsTarget with projectile stop
US3341204 *Sep 3, 1963Sep 12, 1967Bill D ReedMethod and apparatus for reading archery targets
US3413005 *Jul 14, 1966Nov 26, 1968Richard A. StearnsZoned liquid golfing target
US3705725 *Oct 23, 1969Dec 12, 1972Polytronic LtdTarget and circuit means for automatically indicating the score of a projectile shot from a target
US4789932 *Sep 21, 1984Dec 6, 1988Austin T. MusselmanApparatus and method for automatically scoring a dart game
US5493112 *Jun 7, 1995Feb 20, 1996Laserscore, Inc.Method and apparatus for detecting the presence and location of an object in a field
US5565686 *Mar 7, 1995Oct 15, 1996Laser Score, Inc.Method and apparatus for detecting the presence and location of objects in a field via scanned optical beams
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/373, D21/307
International ClassificationF41J5/00, F41J5/048
Cooperative ClassificationF41J5/048
European ClassificationF41J5/048