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Publication numberUS2506680 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1950
Filing dateJun 10, 1944
Priority dateJun 10, 1944
Publication numberUS 2506680 A, US 2506680A, US-A-2506680, US2506680 A, US2506680A
InventorsOtis Herbert C
Original AssigneeHerbert C Otis Jr
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Well packer
US 2506680 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 9, 1950 H. c. OTIS 2,506,680

WELL PACKER Filed June 10, 1944 I 4 Sheets-Sheet l May 9, 1950 4 H. c. OTIS WELL PACKER Filed June 10 1944 4 Sheet t 2 y 1950 H. c. OTIS 2,506,680

WELL PACKER Filed June 10, 1944 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Patented May 9, 1950 WELL PACKER Herbert G. Otis, Dallas, Tex., assignor of forty per cent to Herbert G. Otis, Jr., Dallas, Tex.

Application June 10, 1944, Serial No. 539,683

15 Claims. (Cl. 166-10) This invention relates to new and useful improvements in well packers.

As the depth to which oil wells are drilled has increased, it has been found that the temperatures at the bottoms of the wells have also increased. It has been customary to use packers employing both natural and synthetic rubber packing elements. Due to the increased temperatures, the eificiency of these natural and synthetic packing elements has been materially reduced to the extent that, in some cases, they are found unreliable due to deterioration under such high temperatures. Experiments have been made and a heat-resisting packing, such as asbestos, has been shown to be satisfactory, but such packing possesses a limited flexibility. It is therefore one object of this invention to provide an improved well packer which is especially adapted for use of asbestos and similar heatresisting packing elements.

A particular object of the invention is to provide an improved well packer especially adapted for the use of heat-resisting packing elements, which elements may be arranged to be expanded into packing position by the pressure of fluids in the well casing.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved well packer for packing off between the tubing and the casing including pressure expanded packing elements and arranged to be run into the well casing and locked in position therein; such a packer being arranged to be released and optionally removed from the well.

Still another object of the invention is to provide a packer which may be left in the casing and the tubing or drill stem removed; whereby tubing or a drill stem may be again run into the well and through the packer to lock the latter in sealing position, or the packer may be removed after the tubing or drill stem has been lifted from the well.

A further object of the invention is to provide a packer having relatively stiff packing elements, whereby the packer may be lowered into a casing member having a bore less than that of the casing, so that the packing elements will have such a close sliding fit in the lesser bore of said member as not to require fluid pressure to expand them into contact with such lesser bore; and also whereby such intimate contact may provide a seal, at very low pressures, without depending upon fluid pressure to expand said packing elements.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a casing nipple, ring or member which may 2 be formed of readily drillable material oiiering reduced resistance to drilling out its bore, for the passage therethrough of well tools, or which may have a liner of such readily drillable material.

Another object of the invention is to provide a packer having a plurality of external heatresisting packing rings adapted to engage in sealing relation with the bore of a casing member and internal heat-resisting packing rings, separated from the external rings, adapted to engage in sealing relation with a tubing section, whereby the casing and tubing of a well may be efiicaciously packed ofi in a new and novel manner.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved and simple locking means for a well packer, which means may be readily operated by adjustment of the well tubing; the parts of which locking means are capable of sturdy construction and are relatively few in number.

A construction designed to carry out the invention will be hereinafter described together with other features of the invention.

The invention will be more readily understood from a reading of the following specification and by reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein an example of the invention is shown, and wherein:

Fig. 1 is a View partly in section and partly in elevation showing a packer constructed in accordance with the invention in its unlocked or running position in a well casing,

Fig. 2 is a similar view showing the packer locked in a well casing,

Fig. 3 is an enlarged horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line 33 of Fig. 1,

Fig. 4 is an enlarged horizontal cross-sectional view taken on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1,

Fig. 5 is an elevation of the lower packer shoe,

Fig. 6 is an elevation of a portion of the tubing section,

Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view of a portion of the upper shoe showing the supporting shoulder,

Fig 8 is perspective view of the locking dogs, an

Figs. 9 to 12, inclusive, are vertical sectional views, each of a modified form of the packer, in locked position in the casing.

In the drawings, the numerals l0 and l I designate respectively, upper and lower lengths of a well casing. A casing member or nipple I3 is interposed between the casing lengths and has its upper end connected to the upper length ill by a coupling collar l 4, while its lower end is connected with the lower casing length II by a the well. It is pointed out that the nipple (Figs. 1 and 2) is provided at its upper end with an in'-- the collar 30 and the collar 24 of the upper shoe 2|; while similarly mounted downwardly facing packing rings 32 are confined between the collar 30 and the body of'the lower shoe 22. The spacer sleeve is also provided with an internal annular collar 33, which preferably has substantially the same internal diameter as the upper and lower shoes so that the tubing section [8 may have a free sliding fit therein. Between" the-collar 33 and the upper and lower-shoes, upwardly and downwardly facing packing rings 31% and 35, re-

' spectively, are confined.

ternal bevelled seat [6 and at its lower end, with;

an internal bevelled edge ll. These bevelled members constitute internal spaced projections; and in some forms of paoker 'as'sembly; may be omitted.

The improved packer, which is designated generally by the letter A, islowered or run into'the casing and is adapted to==be locked and supported withinthe nipple The packerincludes an axial-tubing section I8; which may be connected atitslower end to a* tubing length I9 by means of a coupling collarZB. The section l8 may be of any 'suitable'length and its upper-end may be connected in the usual tubing string or it may be suitably connected to a well choke such as is shown in my LettersPa-tent'No. 2,246,811.

The body ofthe packer includes an upper shoe Zi-and a lower shoe 22 which are connected by a spacer s1eeve-23 -and isgenerally-designated by the letter BI The well packenA thus comprises in general, an axial tubingsection It, which'is slid-- able vertically or longitudinally within a body: B;

while the packer assembly includes these elements and-the nipple l 3'. r

The upper shoe 2-1 is provided with a medial annular flange orcollar'24'. The lower end of this collar is reduced'to provide an overhanging annular shoulder 25, which is preferably beveled. The collar is also provided with a duct zfi leading from its upper side and openingthrough the reduced portion below the shoulder 25. The'purpose of this duct, of which theremaybe a plurality, isto conduct fluid from above the collar to'a point below the shoulder when the packer is set. The upper end ofthe shoe 2] is provided with a fishing neck 21 which is common in this artf Belowthe' collar the shoe istreduced to forrn ashank 28 which-is externally screW -threaded;

The spacer sleeve 2a is internally screw threaded at itsupper: end'to receive the shankZB,

and: the shank 28 is screwed: into the upper. end of the sleeve until the collar-14 comes to restthereon Theilower end of the spacer sleeve 23 is also internally screw-threadedand receives the external screw-threads ofa reduced shank 29 formed on the. upper end of the lower shoe 22. The shank 29.is screwedinto the sleeve 23-until the lower end ofthe' sleeve abuts'the annular body of the shoe 2 2. 7 j

The spacer sleeve 23 is provided with a medial external'collarBU. 'It -will'be observed 'that, while the" body or the lower shoe 22 and the collar 30 each havean external diameter providing for a' loose sliding fit in the nipple [3, the up'perp'ortion of the collar 24 has an overall diameter greater than the internal diameter of the nipple I3 so that, when the packer A is loweredfrom the position shown in Figure llto' the position shown in Fig.2, the shoulder 25will come to rest on the upper seat IS of the nipple l3 and thereby prevent further downward movement ofthe packer.

Upwardly facing packing rings 3|, whichsnug' ly surround-thesleeve zii, are confined between The packing rings illustrated are of the well known V-type and are adapted to be expanded by fluid pressure:

The rings 3| and 3d are disposed toexpand and packed" between the nipple i3 and tubing section lswhen subjected to fluid pressure from above; while the rings 32 and 35 are disposed to expand and pack oiT between the nipple and casing section, when subjected to fluid pressure frombelow. Owing; to the fact that the rings may be made of.sucht diameters as to snugly engagethe innerwall' of the" nipple l3 and'the outer: surface of the tubing section IS, without fluidepressure expansion,,as well" as: to the fact that they;are;c0mposed. of asbestos or other heat resisting material, which makes them stiff, they areasomewhat loosely confined longitudinally of the. body B; This loose mounting of the rings permitsthe pressure fluids; to more readily enter between individual rings and expand them.

Other types of V-shapedrings, now in common use may be' used. Packing rings, which are also V-shapedand generally known under the name Chevron, even when made of asbestos, because of their constructiomare more flexible than the ordinary V-type illustrated. in the drawings. Thus, if Chevron rings are employed; and they may be, expansionof thepacking' rings into contact with the nipple andptubing by pressure fluid could be relied. upon, and such rings may not c'ontact;. or intimately contact, the nipple and tubing section, until subjected to expansion by pressure fluid. Thus, it is to be understood that the invention includes heat-resisting packing rings which have a relatively tightfit in the bore of thenipple 'l 3:. and which will engage the tubing section I8 'inav like mamier, thereby forming. a seal at very lowpressuites; as. for instance less than .50'lbs; per sq: in., with or without the aid of: pressure fluid expansion; The invention also includes heat-resisting packing rings which, whilesinitially engagingthe surfaces to be packed off, do notiJthereby? form seala'as' well as such packing rings which do not initially engage the surfaceszand.which depend'upon pressure fluid to expandthem into contact with the surfaces; both types dependingupon pressure fluid to expand them.intoisealingpositions; 1

Itis to be noted thatthesealing and locking of the packer, as well as the construction of the nipple l3; are subject to considerable variation. For instance by use of structures; such as are hereinafter described? instead of the nipple iii, an ordinary; section of: easing may be used, and instead'ofthe'bevels [Band-'11? one or both may be omitted and other structures substituted.

A very important feature ofthe" invention is the means for locking the packer in the nipple l3, whereby it is'held" against both upward and downward movement; The body of the lower shoe 2 2 is provided with a transverse slot 35, as is best shown in Fig. 3. The tubing section 18 passes throughthe cent'er of the slot 35 and lockingdogs' fl are slidably mounted in the slot on opposite sides of said tubing section. Each dog has on its outer edge an arcuate lip or boss 38 which is provided with upper and lower bevelled edges as is shown in detail in Fig. 8. It will also be noted that each dog has an arcuate bevel 39 on its inner upper edge. To limit the inward and outward sliding movements of the dogs 31, each has a short recess 31 (Figs. 3 and 8) for receiving a stud 38' screwed into the shoe 22 and projecting into the slot 36.

The tubing section I8 is provided with an external annular recess 40 beveled at its upper and lower ends, as is shown in Figs. 2 and 6. The dogs 3! are each of such a length that, when the tubing recess 40 is in registration therewith, their inner ends may be slid into said recess, whereby the lips 38 will not extend beyond the outer surface of the body of the shoe 22, and this will permit the packer to be passed downwardly into the nipple It. When the overhanging shoulder 25 of the upper shoe 2! comes to rest upon the upper bevel l6 of the nipple l3, the dogs 3! will be so located that, if moved outwardly, their lips 38 will engage under the lower edge 1'! of the nipple. With the packer in this position, it is obvious that by moving the tubing section It downwardly the dogs will be displaced from the recess 40; the outer surface of the tubing riding between said dogs, forces them outwardly into locking position. Likewise, if the tubing is moved upwardly to register the recess 40 with the dogs, an upward pull on the packer will cause the edge I! to displace the dogs inwardly and thereby release the packer.

In order to hold the packer body B in position on the tubing section l8 while the packer is being lowered into the well and set, the body of the lower shoe 22 is provided with diametrically opposite screw-threaded bores 41 adapted to receive set screws 42. These screws are provided on their inner ends with frangible studs 43 adapted to engage in an annular groove 44 on the tubing section I 8 just below the recess 40. These screws may be referred to generally as shear pins.

When the packer has reached its setting position, the weight of the tubing, when moved downwardly, will be sufiicient to shear the studs 43 and thus permit free movement of the tubing section i8 longitudinally of the packer body B.

When the packer parts are in the position shown in Fig. 1, perforations 45, in the tubing section l8, providing by-pass ports, will be located above the fishing neck 21 of the upper shoe 2! These ports will permit fluid to pass through the tubing section I 8 and escape above the packer when it is being lowered into the casing. When the tubing section I8 is moved downwardly to the position shown in Fig. 2, these ports are then below the packing rings 34 and 35. By moving the tubing section l8 downwardly a sufficient distance, the lowermost ports may be located below the packer and provide a tubing inlet at this point. When the tubing section I8 is connected to a choke device such as is shown in my aforesaid Letters Patent, the by-pass ports may be omitted because the fluid will pass through the ports of the patented device.

When the tubing is moved upwardly from the position shown in Fig. 2 to release the dogs 31, the coupling collar 2|] will engage the lower shoe 22 and thereby the packer may be removed from the well casing with the tubing. If it should be desired to leave the packer in the nipple l3, and if the tubing members 18 and H! are of the flush joint type, it is obvious that the tubing may be lifted and pulled from the well without disturbing the setting of the packer. Under such conditions the packer would be supported by the shoulder 25 on the seat It and the central opening, left by the removal of the tubing or drill stem, would permit a free upward flow so that pressure from below would not dislodge the packer although the dogs 31 would not be positively held in locking position. The drill stem or tubing string could be again run into the casing and through the packer. If for any reason it was desired to remove the packer, a suitable fishing tool could be lowered in the casing and engaged with the fishing neck 2?.

In using the packer (Figs. 1 and 2), the packer body B is made up as shown in the drawings and. fastened on the tubing section I8 by means of the set screws 42, which establishes the relation shown in Fig. l. The tubing is then run into the well until the shoulder 25 comes to rest on the upper seat It of the nipple l3. Further downward movement of the tubing will shear the studs 43, and continued downward movement of the tubing will cause the dogs 3! to be displaced from the recess 40 and moved under the edge I! of the nipple i3. This will securely lock the packer in the nipple. When it is desired to remove the packer, it is simply necessary to elevate the tubing until the coupling collar 2Q engages the lower shoe 22 and continued upward movement of the tubing will cause the edge H to displace the dogs 37 inwardly so as to release the locking device, since when the coupling collar 29 engages the lower shoe 22, the recess 40 is registered with the dogs 31.

In Fig. 9 a form of packer assembly is shown wherein the elements It and I? are omitted from the nipple l3. The structure or the packer body B is somewhat changed. The upper shoe E6 is provided with the locking dogs 31, instead of mounting them in the lower shoe. The upper portion of the shoe 5B is reduced at 5| and sumcient clearance is left between the lower portion of said shoe and the bore of the nipple to permit pressure fluid to reach the rings 3! and St.

The lower edge of the upper casing section it, is spaced sufiiciently above the upper edge of the nipple to permit the outer ends of the dogs 31 to enter therebetween in the coupling l4. The lips 38 of the dogs are omitted and the upper and lower outer edges of said dogs are provided with edges 52 and 53, respectively. The lower edge of the upper casing section is beveled to form a shoulder 54 to receive the beveled edges 52 of the dogs 3'! and lock the packer against upward displacement.

The packing rings 3|, 32, 34 and 35 are substantially the same in Fig. 9 as they are in Figs. 1 and 2; however, instead of the integral collars 30 and 33, loosely disposed spacer collars or rings 30 and 33' are employed. The spacer rings are shaped on their upper and lower sides to receive the V-shaped packing rings. The sleeve 23' is similar to the sleeve 23 and receives the screwthreaded shank 28' of the upper shoe.

A modified lower shoe 55 has an upstanding screw-threaded shank 29' which is screwed into the lower end of the sleeve 23'. The lower shoe carries the shear pins 42.

In order to support the packer, a seat ring 56 is fastened between the lower edge of the nipple l3 and the upper edge of the lower casing section II. The inner upper edge of the ring is beveled at 51 and the lower outer edge of the shoe 55 area-rec has. an. inclinedshoulder. 58.. adaptedv to. seat on... the edge. 51.

Thefoperationis 'similarito thatofFigs 1'. and? 2,, and thepacker illustratedin, Fig. 9i'is. in. its locked position; When the. tubing section. Isis. lowered in the casing, the studs 4340f theshear pins Mare engaged in'tlie groove 44. When the. shoulder 58"comesto. rest. upon the edge 51' of" the ring. 56, the dogs 3.1. will be. within. the. coupling. 14. Upon shearing the pins and'moving, thetubingsection l8 downwardly, the. dogs .3]. will be. expanded. so that the, edgesiz willen age, under the shoulder-54 and the .packerthus locked. in place.

Another. form. isillustrated in .Fig. wherein a casing member 50.. is employed instead of the. nipple .l 3. It is tobe understoodthe term .casi-ng, member as used herein is intended tocover. either. av nipple or. a, tubular member, adapted in all. instances to be. connectedin and form a. part of the casing string. The. casing member maybe an ordinary lengthof casing.

The packer body Bincludes a sleeve 6| similar to the sleeve 23. (Fig. 9) andthe spacer rings 3!! and 33 are also used; The upper. shoe 62in this form is slightly less in size than the integral casing. diameter and has. a reduced screw-threaded. shank1B3 which screws into-the upper endofthe. sleeve; while the reduced. shank $4 of a lower shoe tdscrewsinto the lower end'of saidsleeve.

While the. packing ringsare indicated bythe. same'numerals 3|, 32, 3.4 and'35, respectivelythe outer rings 3| and 32 should be of the Chevron type, because they must be expanded by pressure fluid into contact with the inner wall' of] the. casing member 50. This is necessary in order to permit the outer rings tofreely slide inthe casing and not become injured.

In place of the ring 56 0f Fig. 9, a dualpuljpose. ring 66 is fastened within the coupling l5. This, ring has an inner upwardly facing bevelled'jseatj 67 and an inner downwardly facing bevelled shoulder 69. The shoe has an inclined 'shoulpder S8 adaptedto rest upon the seat ETand support the packer; while the dogs 31 have their outer upper edges beveled at 10' to lockunden the shouldertfi; Thering thus holds. the packer. against both upward and downward displace.- ment. Fig. 11 sets forth a further form which, in. general structure, is 'veryfsimil'arto Figs. l'j'and 2,

and is, in many respects, the'preierable packer.

The nipple l3, packing rings 3f, 32, 34 and 35,, respectively and the collars 3H and 33.; are. the same as in Figs. 1 and 2'.

An upper shoe H" has a marginal depending;v

flange 12 at its lower end which isfiinternally screw-threaded to receivetheupper end of. the

sleeve '13.", which in other respects is the same. as the sleeve 23. The nipple l3gis providedatits: oppositegendswith the beveled elements l6 and" i? and the upper shoe H hasanannular shoulder M onits lower' outer edge, seating on the seat It. I

The lower shoe has an upstanding shank I5 externally screwethreaded and: screwed into thelower end of ilhHSlQBV-T3', and-also carries a depending flange 'Il surrounding: the. tubing-= section it and'carrying-the shear pins 4 2:. The" dogs 31 are substantially theisameas inFig. 10;

but lock under theV-edge l 'i', as-in fig 2.

Still another form isshown. in'Fig. 12;, which except for-the upper shoe 80,;the.-lower-shoe. 81: i

and the nipple 82', is the. same. as,.in-r 1 1, Theupper shoe BI): is like-.the: upper shoe.- 1.1-:

Big. l1, except it isgivenanoverall.diameter per:

mitting it to, telescope. theupper end of the nipple, with sufiicient clearance to permit pressure fluid'to reach the. upper packing rings 31;. p and the shoulder 14*is, omitted;

The bore of the lower end of the. nipple is reduced. at 8i3to provide a beveled projection or inclined-annular seat.84; The lower shoe M has an overhanginginclined shoulder and, there.- below, is of such size as to pass freely through thereduced bore 83. The lower edge of thebore 83" has the annular edge I! for receiving the locking dogs, 3]. The shoulder 84 and. the edge l1,",function similarly to thedual purpose ring GGZofLFifg. l0.

The upper shoes in Figs. 9 t0 12,,inclusive, each. havethe fishing, neck 27.. The rings. 5 5 and 66'.

andthe nipples 13(Fig. 11) and 82 may all be made of readily drillable material.

obvious that in each packer assembly, herein illustrated, some form of seat or projection must be provided to support the packer in the casing... This projection or seat may be the nipple bevel.

.apart thereof, sov far as locking the packer in placeis concerned; and the term casing as used herein'is intended'to broadly include the nipple or casing member. The elements It, 51, 611and84may .bereferred to as supports or seats; while. theelements'. ll, 54, 69. and 83 may be referred to-as internal means, stops or projections to. beengaged by the locking dogs or elements.

Theforegoing description of the invention is explanatory thereof and various changes in the size, shapeand materials, as well as in the detailsof the, illustrated construction may be made,

within the scope of the appended claims, With? out departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim and desire to-.-secure. by Letters Patent is:

I. Aweu packingapparatus including, a casing.

nipple, and a packer detachably mounted-on the. tubing section and movable into the nipple, said.

packerhaving means for engaging one of the projectionsoi the nipple, whereby it is supported in said nipple, and locking means engageable with.

the other projection of the nipple to lock said packer against upward displacement in the nipple;

2., Awell packingappara-tus including, a casing member connected in a stringof casing, a tubing- .section connected in a tubing string and extending through the casing member, a packer through which the tubing section-is slidable, said packer having packingelements for sealing off between the casing member and the tubing section, a ring mounted in thecasing string adjacent said cas ing member for supporting the packer within the casing member, and lockingmeans carried'by the packer-having movablelocking elements, the tubingsect-ion having meansfor moving thelocking elements into. locking engagement withthe cas I It is not. believed necessary to'describe the operation of the packers shown in Figs. 10, 11 and 12. It is.

ing member upon longitudinal movement of said section.

3. A well packing apparatus including, a casing member having a seat and a stop therein and adapted to be connected in a string of casing having a greater internal diameter than the internal diameter of the casing member, a packer movable into the casing member supported on the seat thereof and having an axial bore therethrough, external fluid-pressure responsive packing rings carried by the packer having a free sliding movement in the casing and a snug sliding fit in the casing member, internal fluid-pressure responsive packing rings carried by the packer and exposed in the bore thereof, a tubing section .adapted to be connected in a tubing string and 4. A well packing device including, 'a casing nipple adapted to be connected in a string of casing and provided with an internal seat and an internal stop spaced from said seat, a tubing section movable into the nipple, a packer detachably mounted on the tubing section and movable into the nipple, said packer having means for engaging on the seat of the nipple, whereby it is supported therein, and expansible locking means carried by the packer for engaging the stop of the nipple to lock said packer against upward displacement in the nipple.

5. A well packing apparatus including, a tubular packer member having internal and external packing elements, expansible locking means carried by the packer member, a tubular casing member adapted to be connected in a string of well casing and having a bore for receiving the packer member, seat means at one end of the casing member for supporting the packer member within said casing member, a locking stop associated with the casing member and located to be engaged by the packer member locking means, and a tubing section adapted to be connected in a tubing string movable longitudinally in the packer member and having means to engage the locking means to displace said locking means to engage the locking stop, whereby the packer member is locked against displacement from the casing member and the packing elements are disposed to seal between the exterior of the tubing section and the interior of the casing member.

6. A well packer including, a sleeve, annular members secured to each end of the sleeve, ex ternal packing surrounding the sleeve between said members, internal packing within the sleeve confined between said members, said packer having a longitudinal bore in which said internal packing is exposed, laterally movable locking dogs in one of the members having their inner ends exposed in the packer bore, and a tubing section slidable in said packer bore in engagement with. the internal packing, said tubing section having means for moving said dogs outwardly upon longitudinal movement of the tubing section.

7. A well packer including, upper and lower annular shoes, a sleeve rigidly connecting the shoes and having a bore greater than the bores of the shoes, internal packing rings confined within the sleeve between the shoes, external packing rings surrounding the sleeve and confined between said shoes, and expansible locking means carried by one of the shoes.

8. A well packer including, upper and lower annular shoes, a sleeve rigidly connecting the shoes and having a bore greater than the bores of the shoes, internal packing rings confined within the sleeve between the shoes, external packing rings surrounding the sleeve and confined between said shoes, and expansible locking means carried by one of the shoes, one of said shoes having an annular bevelled edge.

9. A well packing apparatus including, a casing having therein a seat and a stop, a tubing section movable longitudinally in the casing, a packer mounted on the tubing section having shear means engaging the tubing section for initially holding said packer in position on the tubing section, said packer sealing off between the tubing section and the casing and having external packing engaging the casing and internal packing engaging the tubing section, the packer engaging on the casing seat, and locking means carried by the packer, the tubing section having means moving the locking means into locking engagement with the casin stop, the casing seat and stop engaging the packer and its locking means, whereby the packer is held against both upward and downward displacement in the casing when the shear means is broken and the tubing section is moved longitudinally in the packer.

10. A packing apparatus as set forth in claim 9, wherein the external and internal packings are fluid-pressure responsive and are exposed to the pressure fluids acting upwardly and downwardly between the casing and the tubing section.

11. A packing apparatus as set forth in claim 9, wherein the tubing has an external recess and the lockin means is exposed to the tubing section, said locking means being movable into said recess when the tubing section is longitudinally adjusted to register said recess with the locking means, whereby the packer is released from the casing stop.

12. A packing apparatus as set forth in claim 9, wherein the casing includes a tubular member having the seat and stop therein and a bore wall of readily drillable material.

13. A well packing apparatus including, a casing member adapted to be connected in a string of well casing, a tubing section adapted to be connected in a well tubing string and to extend through said casin member, said casing memher having a bore of less diameter than the internal diameter of the casing string in which it is connected, a packer through which said tubing section may he slid detachably fastened on said tubing section, said packer having fluidpressure responsive rings adapted to be expanded by pressure fluid to seal oii between the bore of said casing member and said tubing section, a seat at one end of said casing member for supporting the packer in the bore of said casing member, and expansible locking means carried. by the packer movable outwardly from said packer, said tubing section having means moving the locking means outwardly into looking engagement with said casing member upon longitudinal movement of said tubing section.

14. A well packing apparatus including, a stationary member having screw threads at its upper and lower ends for connecting it in a casing string in a well, i a tfi ngisection "ada 1703139 ,connected' in a tubing "string and '.to extend ifthrough' said casing .member, a packer mounted on said tubing section detachably fastened to the .latter, said tubing section being slidable'throngh jthe packer when re'leased"therefrom,1said packer ".havingpacking elements forsealin'g' dfi both said easingmem'ber and saidtubing section, means at acne end of said casing member forsupporting. the Qfpacker therein againstfdownward displacement, [and-locking means carried .by the "packer and -.having 1. movable locking elementsysa'id tubing section," having means 'movingthe locking xe'lements into engagement withisaid casing mem- 1ber,up,onj longitudinal movement of said'tubing section. 1. 'Atubular well "packer including, a spacer 'sleeve, an uppershoe mounted on the upper end of the sleeve, internal heat-resisting [packing Jrings isposedwithin' the sleeve between thet'shoes ,adapted' to be expanded byfiuidpressure some v of said. internal rings facing in one direction and others of said rings facing in 'theoppo'site' direcition, external heat-resisting packing firings mounted externally on the. sleeve between the 1 shoes and adapted tobeexpanded'by fluid pressure, some ofsaid externalrings facing in the 1 opposite direction also sOni-edf'said'exterriajirmgs surrounding some of the internal rings, and '.1atera11y"m0vab1e locking means carried by one of the-shoes having outer exposed on the exteriorof the packer and inner ends exposed at the interior of the wpacker.

HERBERT C. IOTIS.

' {REFERENCES "CITED ,The following ,rferencestareof record in th file of this ,patent:

*UNITED- STATES PATENTS Number Name Date" 967,650 Locke Aug. 16, 1910 1,318,352 *Cameron etal 'Oct. 14,1919 2,019,885 Black u NOV. 5, 1935 2,055,683 Edwards "Sept. 29, 1936 "2,129,433 7 MaCClatchie -1 Sept-6, 1938 2,176,355 Otis "Oct. 17, 1939 2,214,261 ,Roth Sept. 10, 1940 2,235,289 "Dunn'et al Mar. '18, 1941 2,255,451 Otis Sept 9, 1941 2,349,253 Edmund May 23, 1944 2,352,423 Church .Q J1me 2'7, 1944 2,368,428

Saurenman Jan; 30, 1945

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Classifications
U.S. Classification166/115, 166/150, 166/131, 166/191, 166/217, 166/203, 166/128, 166/129
International ClassificationE21B33/12
Cooperative ClassificationE21B33/12
European ClassificationE21B33/12