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Publication numberUS2506706 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1950
Filing dateSep 9, 1948
Priority dateAug 11, 1948
Publication numberUS 2506706 A, US 2506706A, US-A-2506706, US2506706 A, US2506706A
InventorsGeorge Colle William
Original AssigneeTilley Lamp Company Ltd
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Incandescent mantle for lighting and heating appliances
US 2506706 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

INCANDESCENT MANTLE FOR LIGHTING AND HEATING APPLIANCES Filed Sept. 9, 1948 W G. COLLE May 9, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 F/GZ.

- Invenlor d/i/fi'aBm 6 0 42 y 1950 w. G. COLLE 2,506,706

I INCANDESCENT MANTLE FOR LIGHTING AND HEATING APPLIANCES Filed Sept. 9, 194 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 P Q 1; 8 c I F/G 4 A Inventor 4/I /G7h a (:9//e

Attorney Patented May 9, 1950 INCANDESCENT MAN'ILE. FQBLIGHTING AND HEATING APPLIANCES William George Colle, London, England, assignmzr to The. Tilleyllamp C p ny Limiter-1,. Londana. En land, a comp y c Great Br ain Application September 9, 194'8; Serial No. 48.", l18' In Great Britain August 1-1; 1948 6 Claims. 1

This invention relates to incandescent. mantles forlighting and heating appliances and of the kind known as soft mantles, that is to say mantles woven in tubular form from artificial silk, vegetable fibres, asbestos, synthetic thread or the like impregnated with one or more substances to render it incandescent when heated by the flame from a burner to which it is attached at one or more points so that the flame-is directed into the tubular mantle.

For convenience theterm burner will be used herein to denote that part of the apparatus to which the tubular mantle is attached and from which the burning gases are emitted to render the mantle incandescent while the term in candescent substance will be used to denote the substance or substances which the soft tubular mantle contains torender it incandescent when heated by the burner whether such substances are in their final form before the mantle is brought into use or are converted into the appropriate substance or substances by the mantle being brought into use. The term "resilient will be used to describe a member which can be deformed by moderate manual pressure and which will return to its original shape promptly when this pressure ceases to be exerted.

The invention is particularly applicable to soft mantles formed by weaving a continuoustube which is cut into lengths to form the individual mantles, where either both ends are adapted to be secured to the burner, or one end only is adapted to be secured to the burner while the other end is either closed or restricted in diameter by means of a draw thread or cord, but it is to be understood that the invention may also be applied to soft tubular mantles of the kind in which one end of the mantle is substantially closed in the process of weaving.

Soft tubular mantles as at present made are provided with a draw thread or cord at one or both ends extending circumferentiallyaround and threaded in and out'through the ends of the woven tube and tied, or with provision for tying. The draw thread at the end which is to be se cured to the burner gives to this end of the tube an eliective diameter such that it can be forced over the end of the burner, usually intoa cir- 21 replaced is not. easy tdperfnrm satisfa r y, with the result that; the nrlantleisv often. dama e or incorrectly locatedi onthe, endof the: burner or twisted" or otherwise, deformed. The relacement of a mantle thus; not. only takes. appreciable time but is frequently wr ly cairriedout, tothedetrimentof thelifezofthe mantle cumferenti'al groove therein. This operation,

which is necessary whenever a mantle has to be and the light. given out.

The present. inventionohastfor. its, objectto. provide an. improved soft; tubular mantle assembly which will enablereplacementof a mantle to be quickly, easily and. correctly perfor ed and' the same, time. will; be simple to manufacture in quantity.

A soft tubular incandescent; mantle. assembly according. to the present inyention comprises a soft woven tubular element including he incandescent substanceior substances and a. resilient ring lying within one end of the tubular element and to which that end of the tubular element is securedbya surrounding; cord. or band having sufiicientresilience to permit the-ring to be sprung on to. the endv of, the burner. Conv ien ly' the surroundin member is in the form of a securing thread QPQOI'd tied around the tubular elementandthe ring, the thread or cord having sufficient resilience to permit the required expansion of the ring when it is sprung on to the. end of a burner. Thus the ring is conveniently formed with. anexternal circumferential groove. or. recess; formed for example by roviding circumferential. flanges at its two edges, into. which roove the thr ad or cor presses the part of the; tubular element which it surrounds.

In any case the end of the tubular element which is secured to: the ring is preferably turned inwards to provide two concentric layers, the ring lying within the inner layer with the cord or band lying; between: the. two layers. This may be effected by first placing the ring; inside: one end of the tubular element, securing the securing thread or cord around it and, then turning the tubular element inside out by pushing the ring through it.

The form of the, ring may varyconsiderably but in a preferred form, l'liiS: made from a strip of sheet metal the edges, of which. are turned over to form flanges while its ends are formed so. as to: overla and; intcreliisah e he. strip has been bent into the form of a ring with the flanges projecting outwardly, in a manner permitting limited sliding movement between the overlapping ends of the strip and hence allowing for the required limited expansion and construction of the ring. For example one end of the strip may be provided with a tongue which projects over the part of the other end of the strip between the flanges and is of such width that its edges lie and can slide under the flanges. Thus, the tongue is slightlyoverlapped by the flanges so that it can slide longitudinally relatively thereto but is held in close proximity to the part of the strip between the flanges over which it lies.

The invention may be carried into practice in various ways but one way of carrying the invention into practice is illustrated by way of example in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure 1 shows in perspective the two parts of the mantle assembly before they are united,

Figure 2 shows the ring at an intermediate point in its formation,

Figure 3 shows the two parts of the assembly in their partly assembled state,

Figure 4 is a sectional side elevation showing the mantle assembly applied to a burner, and

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the mantle assembly in position on a burner before lighting.

The mantle assembly is made up from a tubular element A which is woven from artificial silk, vegetable fibres, asbestos, synthetic thread or the like impregnated with one or more suitable incandescent substances in the usual manner, and has a draw string A extending around and threaded in and out through one end as shown, and a resilient metal ring B.

The ring B is formed from a strip of metal of appropriate length the edges of which are turned over as shown at B in Figure 2 to form flanges, while one end, in the form of a tongue B projects beyond the flanged part. The strip of metal, which thus has the form shown in Figure 2, is then bent into the form of a ring as shown in Figure 1 with the edges of the tongue B slipped under the inturned edges of the strip constituting the flanges at the opposite end of the strip. The tongue B is free to slide longitudinally beneath the flanges B so as to permit small variations in the diameter of the ring and the bending of the strip into a ring is so performed that the resilience of the ring B always tends to close it to its smallest diameter.

In assembling the tubular element A and the ring B, the ring B is placed within the end of the tubular element A remote from the draw string A and a securing cord C is tied tightly around the part of the tubular element around the ring so as to secure this end of the tubular element to the ring as shown in Figure 3. The securing cord may either be passed once or more around the ring and knotted as shown or may be formed into a clove hitch around the ring.

In any case after the end of the tubular element has been secured to the ring as shown in full lines in Figure 3 the tubular element is turned inside out by passing the end secured to the ring through the tubular element so that the end of the tubular element secured to the ring becomes folded over on itself as indicated in dotted lines at A in Figure 3 and Figure 4 with the securing cord C lying between the two folds.

The end of the tubular element A remote from the ring B may then be drawn in by the draw the part of a burner Or like member which it is' to engage or may be left as shown in Figure 3 in readiness to be drawn in when applied to a burner. Generally it will be preferred to draw this end in to an appropriate diameter so that when fitted to a burner it only has to be pushed over the appropriate part.

The improved mantle assembly formed in the manner described above is intended for application to a burner of the known type shown in Figures 4 and 5 comprising a mixing chamber D to which vaporised fuel is delivered through a passage D having an external circumferential groove D while air is drawn in through passages D and an annular nozzle D having a ring of burner passages D and an external annular groove D In applying a mantle assembly as described above to such a burner the ring B is pressed upwards over the end of the nozzle until it springs into the groove D the resilience of the ring B and of the securing cord C permitting the ring to expand to the required extent and then causing it to contract into the groove D so as to be securely mounted on the burner. The lower end of the tubular element A is then pressed over the lower end of the passage D into a circumferential groove D therein so that the mantle assembly occupies the position shown in Figures 4 and 5.

When the mantle is lit it shrinks into its final form in known manner.

Usually in constructions of burner of the type shown the vaporised fuel will be delivered to the burner through a tube passing up through the passage D and provided with a central valve, but since the construction of burner forms no part of the present invention, it will not be further described.

What I claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

l. A soft tubular incandescent mantle assembly comprising a soft woven tubular element containing the incandescent material, a diametrally expansible resilient ring lying within one end of the tubular element, and a securing cord surrounding the end portion of the tubular element around the ring and serving to secure such end portion to the ring, the cord permitting the ring to be manually expanded so that it can be sprung onto a burner.

2. A soft tubular incandescent mantle assembly as claimed in claim 1, in which the end of the tubular element surrounding the resilient ring is turned inwards so as to provide a circumferential fold and the securing cord lies between the two layers of the fold.

3. A soft tubular incandescent mantle assembly as claimed in claim 2, in which the resilient ring is formed from a strip of material bent into cylindrical form with its two ends overlapping and interengaging and capable of sliding circumferentially to a limited extent relatively to one another without becoming disengaged from one another.

4. A soft tubular incandescent mantle assembly as claimed in claim 3 in which the ring is formed from a strip of sheet metal the edges of which are turned over to form two shallow outwardly extending flanges between which the securing cord lies, a tongue projecting from the part of one end of the strip lying between the flanges over the part of the other end of the strip between the fianges with the edges of the tongue lying and slidable longitudinally beneath such thread A to a suitable diameter to fit around 76 flanges.

sembly as claimed in claim 5, in which the ring 10 is formed from a strip of sheet metal the edges of which are turned over to form two shallow outwardly extending flanges between which the securing cord lies, a tongue projecting from the part of one end of the strip lying between the 15 flanges over the part of the other end of the strip between the flanges with the edges of the tongue lying and slidable longitudinally beneath such flanges.

WILLIAM GEORGE COLLE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 801,533 Maaske Oct. 10, 1905 1,227,260 Gotty May 22, 1917 1,601,972 Fulton Oct. 5, 1926 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 172,641 Germany July 11, 1906

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US801533 *Aug 18, 1904Oct 10, 1905Franz GlinickeIncandescent gas-lamp of the inverted type.
US1227260 *Aug 29, 1916May 22, 1917Gotty Gas Lighting CompanyGas-mantle ring.
US1601972 *May 5, 1922Oct 5, 1926Cons Steel Strapping CompanySeal
DE172641C * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2715825 *Dec 7, 1951Aug 23, 1955Zimmerman Harold FMantles
US5639231 *Aug 9, 1995Jun 17, 1997The Coleman Company, Inc.Mantle and spring clip assembly
US5701730 *Mar 25, 1996Dec 30, 1997Tba Industrial Products LimitedIncandescent mantles
Classifications
U.S. Classification431/100
International ClassificationF21V19/06, F21H1/00, F21V19/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21H1/00, F21V19/06, F21H1/04
European ClassificationF21V19/06, F21H1/00, F21H1/04