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Publication numberUS2506821 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1950
Filing dateApr 12, 1946
Priority dateApr 12, 1946
Publication numberUS 2506821 A, US 2506821A, US-A-2506821, US2506821 A, US2506821A
InventorsWhite Newton H
Original AssigneeRubberset Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paintbrush wrapper
US 2506821 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 9, 1950 N. H. WHITE PAINTBRUSH WRAPPER Filed April 12, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 MN" I IN VEN TOR. /V5W ro/v H WH/ TE y 1950 N. H. WHITE 2,506,821

PAINTBRUSH WRAPPER Filed April 12, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN T OR. /VEW 7'O/V H WH/ TE Patented May 9, 1.950

PAINTBRUSH WRAPPER Newton H. White, Montclair, N. J., assignor to Rubberset Company, Newark, N. .L, a corporation of New Jersey Application April 12, 1946, Serial No. 661,474

3 Claims. (Cl. 206-15.1)

The present invention relates to a wrapper for articles such as paint brushes, and more particularly to such a wrapper made from paper, cardboard or other flexible sheet material, of exceedingly simple and inexpensive design and which is provided with a fastening device which it is assured may be repeatedly used.

Many forms of wrappers for paint brushes have been suggested or used in the past, and a number of such Wrappers have been provided with fastening devices intended for repeated use in order that the wrapper may be used not only as an enclosure for the brush when new but also may be used for protecting and retaining the shape of the brush after use. A number of the past combinations of wrappers and fastening means have been so fragile as to be impractical, or have been sufliciently complicated in construction and operation as to be a source of vexation, particularly since the job of cleaning and wrapping a paint brush is usually included in the aftermath of a job of painting.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a wrapper and fastening means of unusual durability which is characterized by its simplicity in construction and use and which is economical to manufacture- Other and further objects will become apparent upon consideration of the following description taken in connection with the drawings accompanying and forming a part of this specification.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a blank from which the wrapper of the present invention may be formed;

Fig. 2 is a view of a wrapper complete with fastening means and showing a brush positioned for enclosure therein;

Fig. 3 is a view illustrating a step in the wrapping of a brush;

Fig. 4 is a view of the wrapper in closed position upon a brush and showing the fastening means in secured position; and

Fig. 5 is a sectional View taken along the line 5-5 in Fig. 4 looking in the direction of the arrows associated with said line.

Referring now to the drawings, the wrapperblank shown in Fig. 1 may be made of paper, light cardboard or other similar sheet material. The wrapper-blank comprises a main panel [0,

side panels 12 and I 4, main flaps I6 and IS, an end panel 2%. an end flap 22, a closure flap 24 and a tab 26. The size, shape and proportions of these elements are subject to considerable variation with regard to the particular object to be wrapped. The embodiment chosen for illustration is designed for an ordinary flat paint brush as shown in Fig. 2 which comprises a handle 28, a ferrule carrying shoulder 39, a ferrule 32 and bristles 34.

Referring again to Fig. 1, the side panels 12 and i l are defined respectively by score lines 36, 3B and 48, 42, the score lines 35 and it serving also to define the side margins of the main panel In. Each of the side panels I2 and It is provided with one or more intermediate score lines 44 which serve to make the side panels collapsible for a purpose to be described.

The main flaps l6 and it are defined respectively by the score lines 38 and c2 and the cut edges of the blank.

The end panel 2% is defined by score line 45, which separates it from the main panel to, and a score line 48 which separates it from the end flap 22. An opening 50 is cut out from the end panel 20 having a shape appropriate to receive the handle of the article to be wrapped. As shown in the drawings, the opening 5% is shaped to receive the handle 28 of the paint brush and to rest upon the shoulder 30 thereof.

The closure flap 24 is defined by the score line 52, separating the flap from the main panel l0, and converging edges 5d. The tab 26 is formed as a continuation of the narrow end of flap 24 and may be separated therefrom by a score line 56. Preferably, the narrow end of the closure flap 24 and the tab 2t are narrower in width than the handle of a paint brush with which the wrapper is to be used. This is to avoid bending or crumpling of this portion of the wrapper when it is in use, as will be more apparent as the description proceeds.

The completed wrapper comprises the blank just described and a fastening device associated therewith as shown in Fig. 2. The fastening device preferably consists of a strip 53 of ductile material, such as metal which may be secured to the closure flap 24 in any suitable manner. For example, the strip 58 may be secured by folding tab 26 thereover and fastening the latter to the closure flap 24. The strip 58 may be frictionally held beneath the tab or it may be further secured by adhesive, staples, or the like. The particular manner of securing the strip 58 to the closure flap 24 is immaterial to the invention, it being necessary only that it be reasonably certain to remain in usable position.

The strip 58 is preferably of such a length as approximately to encircle the handle 28 and it may be rectangular or circular in cross-section. The strip 58 should be sufiiciently ductile to permit it to be easily bent but of course it should have sufiicient stiffness to assure that it will retain the wrapper in position.

The unusual simplicity of use of the wrapper just described will become apparent upon a consideration of Figs. 2, 3 and 4 which show sequential steps in applying the wrapper to a paint brush. The brush is arranged with its bristles pointing in the direction of the closure flap 24 and the handle 28 is inserted through the aperture 50. upon the main panel In and the end'fiap 22 is folded over the shoulder 30 of the brush'in'to the position shown infFig. 2. The main flaps l6 and I8 are next successively folded irrespective of order into the position shown in Fig. 3 and the closure flap 24 is then brought over the main flaps to the position shown in Fig. 4.

It will be observed that the main flaps l6 and H3 are so proportioned asto-overlap upon the brush and that the closure flap 24 is sufficiently long to extend beyond the end wall 20 whereby to position the fastening strip 58 fOr engagement with the handle at a point outside the body of the wrapper. The fasteningstrip-ES may now be bent around the handle as shown in Figs. 4 and to secure the wrapper in position on the brush.

Obviously, the wrapper herein disclosed may be supplied as a container for a new brush and may be repeatedly used by the purchaser, or the wrapper may be furnished separately for use on brushes already in the possession of the user. Durability of the wrapper is of coiu'se dependent upon the particular sheet material selected by the a manufacturer, but in any event the ductile metal fastening strip 58 has been found to last until the wrapper is otherwise ready to be discarded.

It is important to maintain the tapered or chisel-like contour of the body of the bristles 34- and the wrapper of the present invention is particularly effective in this connection. The side panels 12 and M are provided with one or more intermediate score lines M as described above, which score lines preferably extend throughout the length of the side panels. The side panels 12 and M will be about as wide as the shoulder and ferrule portion of the brush is thick. The score lines 44 serve to weaken the panels 12 and It so that they will be collapsible. Thus when the closure flap 24 is foldedalong the score line '52 the tendency will. beto form an acute angle between the panel I ll and 'the closure-flap 24. Since the bristles of the brush ofier little're- 'sistance and the sideipanels I2 and M are col- .main panel In and the main flaps l6 and I8.

As pointed out above, the wrapper may be adapted for use with different sizes and styles of brushes or other articles with which it may be useful. Such adaptation will entail changes and The bristles-are then disposed 'panels being of a width generally corresponding variations in proportion, shape and size of the various panels and flaps without sacrificing the advantageous features emphasized herein. The terms and expressions used in describing the invention are intended to be descriptive rather than limiting. For example, the strip 58 has been described as preferably made of ductile metal and it has been pointed out that it may be of circular cross-section as a wire or of rectangular crosssection as desired. While this is preferred because such ductile metal is readily obtainable, it is to be understood that other ductile materials such as plastics, specially treated paper, or wrapped wire, maybe used if so desired.

I claim:

1. A wrapper for a paint brush which consists of a foldable blank of sheet material having a panel with an aperture therein adapted to receive the handle of a brush, a main panel generally conforming in size to one of the sides of the shoulder and bristle portions of a brush having the handle thereof positioned in said aperture, a plurality of flaps foldable upon the opposite side of'said brush, a closure flap formed as a continuation of said main panel and foldable around the ends of the bristles of said brush into a position overlying saidflaps, said closure flap having a portion which extends when said closure flap is thus folded beyond said first named panel into proximity withan-exposedportion of the handle ofsaidbrush, and a. ductilemetal strip secured to the extended portion of-said closure flap and adapted to be bent 'into gripping engagement with said-exposed portion of said handle to hold said wrapper in position upon said brush.

2. A wrapper for a flatlpaint brush which consists of a'foldable blank of sheet material having a panel with an aperture therein adapted to receive the handle of a brush, a main panel generallyconformingin size to. one of the sides of the shoulder and bristle portions of a brush having the handle thereof positioned in said aperture, side panels attached to said main panel, said side panels being of a width generally corresponding to the thickness of the shoulder of said brush and being foldable into positions embracing opposed narrow sides of said brush, a plurality of flaps 'folded beyond said first named panel into proximity with an exposed portion of the handle of said brush, and a ductile metal strip secured to the extended portion of said closure flap and adapted to be bent into gripping engagement with said exposed portion of said handle to hold said wrapper in position upon said brush.

3. A wrapper for a flat paint brush which consists of a foldable blank of sheet material having a panel with an aperture therein'adapted' to receive the handle of a brush, a main panel generally conforming in size to one of the sides of the shoulder and bristle portions of a brush having the handle thereof positioned in said aperture, side panels attached to said main panel, said side to the thickness of the shoulder of said brush and being foldable into positions embracing opposed narrow'sides of said'brush, a flap attached to 5 said first named panel, a flap attached to each of said side panels, all of said flaps being foldable upon the opposite side of the shoulder and bristle portion of said brush, a closure i'iap attached to said main panel and foldable around the ends of the bristles of said brush into a position overlying said flaps, said closure flap having a portion which extends when said closure flap is thus folded beyond said first named panel into proximity with an exposed portion of the handle of said brush, and a ductile metal strip secured to the extended portion of said closure flap and adapted to be bent into gripping engagement with said exposed portion of said handle to hold said wrapper in position upon said brush.

NEWTON H. WHITE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 513,568 Gonon Jan. 30, 1894 646,638 Cutler Apr. 3, 1900 671,589 Grant Apr. 9, 1901 10 1,852,679 Schneider Apr. 5, 1932 2,290,359 Ringler July 21, 1942 2,414,720 Cohen Jan. 21, 1947 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 267,356 Great Britain Mar. 17, 1927

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US513568 *Feb 24, 1893Jan 30, 1894 Paul e
US646638 *Jan 23, 1900Apr 3, 1900Harry M CutlerEnvelop.
US671589 *Oct 6, 1898Apr 9, 1901Samuel P GrantSecuring device for bags, & c.
US1852679 *Mar 4, 1931Apr 5, 1932Pittsburgh Plate Glass CoBrush holder or wrapper
US2290359 *Jul 5, 1940Jul 21, 1942Rubberset CompanyBrush retainer
US2414720 *Mar 16, 1943Jan 21, 1947Agency Paper CompanyPortfolio
GB267356A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3136409 *May 17, 1963Jun 9, 1964Star Brush Mfg Co IncPackage and receptacle for brushes
US4353476 *Jul 7, 1980Oct 12, 1982Cowgill Charles FPaint applicator holder
US5566820 *May 15, 1995Oct 22, 1996Vining Industries, Inc.Dust mop package
US5740908 *Mar 28, 1996Apr 21, 1998Goody Products, Inc.Device for displaying and protecting a hairbrush
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/362.4
International ClassificationB65D75/02, B65D75/00
Cooperative ClassificationB65D75/02
European ClassificationB65D75/02