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Publication numberUS2507702 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 16, 1950
Filing dateMar 4, 1949
Priority dateMar 4, 1949
Publication numberUS 2507702 A, US 2507702A, US-A-2507702, US2507702 A, US2507702A
InventorsFields Mack R
Original AssigneeAbbott Lab
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insufflator
US 2507702 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1950 M. R. FIELDS 2,507,702

INSUF'FLATOR Filed March 4, 1949 llllli I INVENTOR.

" flack if. EzieZds Patented May 16, 1950 INSUFFLATOR Mack R. Fields, Libertyville, Ill., assignor to Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, 111., a corporation of Illinois Application March 4, 1949, Serial No. 79,659

9 Claims. 1

My invention relates to the administration of medicament, and includes among its objects and advantages compact, convenient, and eflicient equipment for medication by the inhalation of powders.

It has recently been discovered that various antibiotics and other medicaments, notably penicillin, can be administered to the human organ ism by inhalation rather than parenterally. In the case of penicillin inhaled deep into the lungs, there is the remarkable advantage that it is possible for the organism to receive such material in powdered form on the lining of the lung and absorb it through the moist surfaces on which it is deposited in such a way that it appears in the blood stream with substantially the same effectiveness as if administered subcutaneously. It is even possible, by a proper selection of grain size and chemical composition, to achieve desirable and controllable delay in the rate of absorption of such material into the system.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a side elevation of a complete administration unit arranged for nasal or oral administration;

Figure 2 is an exploded view of the insuillator proper;

Figure 3 is a side elevation of the insuiilator equipped with a different type outlet; and

Figure 4 is a detail of the deflector.

In the embodiment of the invention selected for illustration, the body It! is provided with a central vertical bore i2. At a lower level this bore communicates with a horizontal inlet !4 and an outlet it. Further up, the bore !2 is enlarged as at is to the diameter necessary to fit the outside of a capsule 2B. The section 18 extends up only a fraction of the vertical dimension of the capsule 2! and above the section l8 the bore is further enlarged as indicated at 22 to define an annular chamber adapted to receive a rubber sealing ring 24 and a plastic retaining ring having a peripheral flange 28 for axial abutment with the extreme upper edge 30 of the body 10.

The capsule 20 may be according to my pending application Serial Number 74,979, filed February 7, 1949, now Patent Number 2,470,298 or any other suitable configuration. In the embodiment disclosed it includes a barrel of the right size to fit in the bore I8, washer 24 and retainer 26, with a closed top at 32 and a foraminated bottom at 34. The capsule includes the flange 36 and knurled handle 38. The particular shape of the flange and handle has no signiflcance when the capsule is used in connection with such a body as is disclosed herein. When assembled, the capsule is reliably held by substantial friction arising from the fact that the washer 24 is a snug lit in the body and a snug fit 0n the capsule.

Means are provided for directing air or other gaseous mediums entering through the inlet l4, up to the capsule 2B in such a way that the stream of gas will entrain and carry out of the capsule a substantial admixture of the powdered contents, which powder will be carried out of the outlet it by the dynamic force of the stream. I have illustrated a deflector in the nature of a cylindrical stud 40 formed to be a light friction fit in the bore 52. The stud has its upper end bevelled nearly all the way across, as indicated at 42, at an angle of about 35 degrees to the axis, leaving a small plateau M at its extreme upper end and at one side of the bore i2. The parts are so proportioned that when the stud 40 is thrust home, this plateau id is substantially-in contact with the screen 34 of the capsule 20. Leading up to and debouching through the center of the plateau 44 is a small groove 46, which groove extends down far enough so that a substantial lower portion of the groove extends across the inlet M to receive the entering air. It will be apparent that gas forced in through the inlet It will have its velocity greatly increased by the reduction in cross section of the stream when it enters the groove 46 and that the air moving through the groove 46 will issue through the plateau 44 and screen 34 and enter the capsule 20. Because the major portion of the area of the screen 34 overlies the bevelled end 42 and is unobstructed, such air will turn over and go back down through the screen as indicatedby the arrow 48 in Figure 2. In so doing it will push out through the screen substantial quantities of the powdered contents and the powder thus ejected will enter the outlet I 6 and thus leave the body l0.

To secure correct positioning of the parts combined for easy cleaning, I form the stud 44 as an upward projection from the center of a flange 50. When the flange '50 is pushed into contact with the body It! the plateau 44 will be correctly positioned with respect to the screen 34. The flange 5G carries a trigger-shaped horn 52 extending below and having a concave face 54 adapted to fit one finger of the hand of the user.

It will be obvious that air under suitable pressure may be supplied to the inlet M in various conventional ways, including connection to a pressure main or mechanical source of air supply in a properly equipped operating room or hospital Ward. I have illustrated also a conventional rubber bulb 56 provided with a conventional check valve at 58 and having a tapered metal discharge nozzle 69 extending horizontally from the tip 62. In Figure 1 the delivery member 64 is a tube of transparent plas'tic'having a tapered end portion 66 adapted to fit on the outlet l5 and a rounded delivery end at 58.

This member is long enough so that the user can hold the entire device comfortably with the"delivery end 68 merely juxtaposed to one of the users nostrils or extendinginto theiopen mouth of the user to or past the uvula. The same equipment can be manipulated with equal convenience by a physician or attendant standin sidfront of the person receiving the medicament.

In Figure 3 the same'body H1 is provided with a short plastic nipple having a tapered end IZ fitting in the outlet 16 and a duplicate tapered end adapted to fit aconventional cannula 11mabronchoscope or other clinic apparatus.

I prefer to make the inlet opening Id materially' larger than the outlet l6 so that the user will always assemble the partsin the same sense, with the groove 45 facing toward the bulb 56.

Others may readily adapt the invention for use under various conditions-of service byemploying one or more of the novel features involved, orequivalents thereof. The'trigger Ed is especially comfortable when the top 62 is replaced with a valve controlled by'thumb pressure, and the bulb 56 is a tube leading to a pressure main. As at present advised with-respect to the apparent scope of my invention, I desireto claim" the following subject matter.

1. Equipment for administration of airborne powders to body cavities comprising, incombination: abody having a vertical bore open at both endsya powder holder having a-perforate end; means for positioning said holder as a plug in the upperend of said' bore, with its perforate end down; said means including arrannular friction washer; an annular'chamber in said body at the upper end of said'bore; and an annular cover forsaid washer; saidlwasher being a'snug fit in said chamber and on said holder; abottom plug insertable in the bottomofsaid bore; said'body having diametrically opposite lateral inlet and outlet passages communicating with said'bore below the perforateendof said holder; said bottompiug including an upwardly extending defl'ector for directing gas enteringsaid inlet up into said holder; said deflectorbein'g shaped to leave clearance adjacent said'outl't to direct intosaid outlet the powder-laden gas coming down from saidholder; hand-power means for delivering gas under pressure into said outlet; and nozzle means connected to said outlet for conveying the powtier-laden gas into a body'cavity;

2. Equipment for the administration of airborne powders to body cavities comprising, in combination: a body having a vertical bore open at both ends; a powder holder havinga perforate end; means for positioning said holder as a plug in'the'upper endof said bore, with its perforate end down; said means including an annular friction washer; a bottom plug insertablein the bottom' of said bore; said body having lateral inlet and outlet passages communicating with'said bore below theperforateendof said holder; said bottom plu including an upwardly'extending deflector. for directing'gas entering said inlet up into said holder; said deflector bein'g'shaped to leave clearance adjacent said outlet to direct into said outlet the powder-laden gas coming down from said holder; power means for delivering gas under pressure into said outlet; and nozzle means connected to said outlet for conveying the powder-laden gas into a body cavity.

3. Equipment for the administration of airborne powders to body cavities comprising, in combination; a body having a vertical bore open at both ends; a powder holder having a perforate end; means for positioning said holder as a plug inithe upper end of said bore, with its perforate and down; a bottom plug insertablc in the bottom of said bore; said body having inlet and outlet passages communicating with said bore below the perforate end of said holder; said bottom' pluglincluding an upwardly extending deflector for directing gas entering said inlet up into saidholder; said deflector being shaped to leave clearance adjacent said outlet to direct into saidoutlet thepowder-laden gas coming down from said holder; means for delivering gas under pressure into said outlet; and nozzle means connected to said outlet for conveying the powder laden gas into a body cavity.

4; Equipment for the administration of airbornepowders'to body cavities comprising, in combination: a body having a vertical bore 'open at both ends; a powder holder having a perforate end; means for positioning said holder as a plug in: the upper end of said bore; with its perforate end down; a bottom plug insertable in the bottom-of said bore; said body having inlet and outlet passages communicating with said bore below the perforate end of saidlholder; said bottom plu including an upwardly extending deflector for directinggas entering said inlet'up into said holder; said deflector being shaped to leave clearance adjacent said outlet to'direct into said outlet the powder laden gas coming down from said holder; and means for causing a stream of gas to flow through said equipment and into a body cavity;

5. Equipment according to claim 4 in which the gas flowing through is delivered to said inlet under pressure.

6. Equipment for the administration of airborne powders to body cavities comprising, in combination: a body having a vertical bore open at both ends; a powder holder having a foraminated end; means for positioning said holder as a plug in the upper end of said bore, with its perforate end'down; a bottom plug inscrtable in the bottom of said bore; said body having inlet and outlet passages communicating with said bore below the perforate endof said holder; said bottom plug including an upwardly extending deflector for directing gas entering said inlet up into said holder; said deflector being shaped to direct a jet of small area against less than half said foraminated holder end; and to guide into said outlet gas leaving through the remainder of said holder end.

7. Equipment for the administration of airborne powdcrs to body cavities comprising, in combination: a body havinga vertical boreopen at the top; a powder holder having a perforate end; means for'positioningsaid holder as a plug in the open upper end of said bore, with" its perforate end down; said body having inletand outlet passages communicating with said bore below the perforate end of said'holder; and a deflector for directing gas entering said inlet up'into said holder; said deflector being shaped to leave clearance-"adjacent'said'outlet to direct into said outlet 5 the powder-laden gas coming down from said holder.

8. Equipment for the administration of airborne powders into body cavities comprising, in combination: a body having a bore open at one end; a powder holder having a perforated end; means positioning said holder as a plug in said open end of said bore with its periorated. end in said bore; said body having inlet outlet passages communicating with said bore; and a deflector adjacent said inlet opening for directing gas entering said inlet into said holder; said deflector being shaped to leave clearance adjacent said outlet to direct into said outlet the powderladen gas coming from said holder.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2943950 *May 7, 1953Jul 5, 1960Haloid Xerox IncElectrostatic developing apparatus and method
US4005711 *Jan 13, 1975Feb 1, 1977Syntex Puerto Rico, Inc.Inhalation device
US4098273 *Nov 5, 1976Jul 4, 1978Syntex Puerto Rico, Inc.Inhalation device
US5273531 *Sep 21, 1992Dec 28, 1993Knoepfler Dennis JMethod of applying thrombic powder in laparoscopic procedures
US8118777May 26, 2010Feb 21, 2012Cook Medical Technologies LlcSystems and methods for delivering therapeutic agents
US8361054Dec 8, 2009Jan 29, 2013Cook Medical Technologies LlcApparatus and methods for containing and delivering therapeutic agents
US8728032Jan 17, 2012May 20, 2014Cook Medical Technologies LlcSystems and methods for delivering therapeutic agents
US9101744Dec 21, 2012Aug 11, 2015Cook Medical Technologies LlcSystems and methods for delivering therapeutic agents
US20100160897 *Dec 8, 2009Jun 24, 2010Ducharme Richard WApparatus and Methods for Containing and Delivering Therapeutic Agents
EP0590289A1 *Aug 17, 1993Apr 6, 1994Engström Medical AbPatient connector
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/203.15, 604/60, 604/217
International ClassificationB05B11/06, A61M15/00
Cooperative ClassificationB05B11/062, A61M2205/075, A61M2202/064, A61M15/0028
European ClassificationA61M15/00C, B05B11/06B