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Publication numberUS2507848 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 16, 1950
Filing dateMay 18, 1948
Priority dateMay 18, 1948
Publication numberUS 2507848 A, US 2507848A, US-A-2507848, US2507848 A, US2507848A
InventorsBashaw Calvin F
Original AssigneeBashaw Calvin F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Support rack for use in bathing infants
US 2507848 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 16, 1950 c. F. BASHAW SUPPORT RACKFOR USE IN BATHING INFANTS 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 18, 1948 CALVIN F. BASHAW 3nvemor (Ittornegs May 16, WEEK c. F. BASHAW 2,507,848

SUPPORT RACK FOR USE IN BATHING INFANTS Filed May 18, 1948 I 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 3% Fas 3 CALVIN F. BASHAW Summer (Ittotnegs Patented May 16, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SUPPORT RACK FOR USE IN BATHING INFANTS 2 Claims.

My present invention relates to that general class of devices that are used in the bathing of infants and more particularly to a support rack for use in bathing infants.

My device is intended to provide a fabric supporting surface for use in bathing infants which will support the infant above the bottom of a bath tub, or of a sink, so that the infant will be supported in an inclined position, thus keeping its head well above the surface of the water while maintaining its body in such close proximity to the water surface that it forms a very convenient way of bathing an infant, and one which insures the maximum safety to the infant as against accidental drowning and the like.

Many serious accidents have resulted from the bathing of infants in bathtubs, or sinks as usually a considerable depth of water is used in order that the suflicient amount of water be available so soap can be rinsed from the infants body without making a soap concentration that is too great for continued bathing. The desire to have a reasonable quantity of water in the tub, has in many instances, made it possible for the infant to turn over when not watched and actually be drowned while the mother left for an instant to attend to some household activities. To overcome this general danger, quite a number of devices under the heading of bathinettes have been produced, wherein it is the intent to provide a separate unit from the bathtub or sink so as to, on one hand to overcome the danger of drowning, and on the other hand, to permit the use of sufficient water as already outlined.

All these devices, however, are cumbersome to use and diflicult to store when not in use, and do not make use of the existing plumbing, which is really ideal in that there is normally hot and cold water supplies, and a convenient sewer connection. It therefore follows, that despite its incidental danger and inconvenience, the bathtub or sink is still the most practical place for bathing an infant, and it is with this thought in mind that I have produced my infant bathing support.

In general, my device consists of a framework, preferably of resilient metal tubing or bar stock, in which one end is arranged so that it will be higher than the other, and this calls for a convertible unit because, as the device is used in the average sink it must support itself from the supporting surface above the level of the sink. If the device is used in a bathtub, the supporting device must raise the child up above the level of the bathtub bottom. I achieve, with my present device these purposes and have it so arranged that it is easily maintained in a sanitary condition and when not in use it is very convenient to store.

The principal object, therefore, of my present invention is to provide a supporting device for an infant that is adaptable to either a kitchen sink or a bathtub, and which will support the infant in an inclined position, in such a manner that it tends to be supported sufficiently above the water level, as to avoid any danger of drowning and the like.

A further object of my invention is to provide a device that is reversible in operation, and adjustable as to length so that it can be easilly adapted to a wide range of plumbing fixtures.

A further object of my invention is to provide a supporting device for infant bathing wherein the actual supporting member can be easily washable fabric, which preferably is arranged so that it is reversible and can be equipped with head rests for use in either position adapted to raise the infants head above the plane of the supporting surface.

Further objects, advantages and capabilities will be apparent from the description and disclosure in the drawings, or it may be comprehended or are inherent in the device.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of preferred embodiment of my invention.

Fig. 2 is a side elevation of my invention showing in dot-and-dash lines an adjusted position of the supporting frame of my infant bathing device.

Fig. 3 is an elevation showing my device in use in a bathtub, certain parts of the tub being broken away and shown in section to better illustrate the use of my equipment.

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional view through a sink showing my equipment in use therein.

Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view showing the construction of the frame of my device in which I have shown the tubular side member in sections, to better illustrate its construction.

Referring more particularly to the disclosure in the drawings, the numeral ll] designates the supporting fabric of my device. This I prefer to form of a reasonably porous strong material, such as some of the loosely woven duck materials or twills to the end that water will tend to drain through the same, and not stand on it, and also I prefer that the material be such that it will admit of repeated laundering without shrinkage. In order to make my covering readily reversible on its supporting frame and so that it may be conveniently taken off and replaced as in laundering and the like, I provide relatively wide seams as I2 and I! so that a passageway is provided on each side throughout the length of the material, through which the supporting frame may be passed. At each end of covering 10, but on opposite sides I provide a head rest as IE3 and H which are formed of tightly stretched strips of fabric secured at their opposite ends by stitching l2 and I4. Under certain conditions it may be desirable to form pillows which may be formed by inserting between rests l6 and H and covering [0, some form of padding such as a small folded towel or like material that will not be injured by being Wet, and which can readily be taken out and dried.

The supporting frame for the fabric cover In, is formed of two substantially U-shaped members as [8 and I9, these are provided with foot portions which extend substantially parallel to the sides of covering 10, and are adapted to support the frame work either by resting on them as shown in Fig. 3, or being supported by them as shown in Fig. 4.

The U-shaped member I8 is provided with vertical portions 24, and straight portions 25 parallel to the sides of covering H]. Member i9 is provided with the foot portions 22, and the connected vertical portions 26. Portions 25 are substantially parallel to portions 24 of member ill, but are longer so as to place members 21 in a different horizontal plane from members 25. This is to enable the angular positioning of the side members, as 32 and 33. The ends 2'! are inserted into the tubular side members 32 and 33 and then the tubing is deformed in some convenient manner as at 36 so that the tubes 32 and 33 become fixed to member [9.

In forming members 25, I prefer that they be of maximum length after the showing of Fig. 5, and to slide within the bore of pipes 32 and 33 so as to provide an element of adjustability. This normally is of little moment in using my device in the bathtub after the showing of Fig. 3, but when used with sinks after the showing of Fig. 4, it becomes very desirable that adjustment be easily effected so that there will be no end play of my frame within the sink.

The angle joining portions 21 and 25 on number I9 is formed as less than a right angle and complementary to the angle formed in member It by the juncture of portions 25 and 24, so that portions 21 and 25 will be axially aligned. The angles formed at points 38 and 60 are preferably right angles if the material from Which members 18 and !9 are made, is of reasonable resiliency, then it is found that the normal yielding of the frame work will still permit portions 20 and 22 to rest snugly in engagement with the supporting surface, after the showing in Fig. 2. The two similar sides of each of the members [8 and i9 are joined preferably by a straight bar, illustrated at 42 and 44. This provides the maximum rigidity to the frame work and prevents it collapsing, but still permits it to yield as by bending in members 24 and 26, and certain amount of torsional distortion in members 20 and 22. This slight amount of yielding gives a degree of elasticity of my whole device that has proved to be very desirable.

It is very desirable to provide the side rails as tubes 32 and 33 illustrated, of sufficient strength to resist bending when an infant is laid on cover In. If this is not so, the two side bars will bend inwardly and that will lower the center of cover all) l0, and create a pocket from which the soapy water will not drain readily, and will detract appreciably from the overall usefulness of the device for the specific purpose it is intended.

The manner of using my device is believed to be quite well illustrated in Figs. 3 and 4. Referring to Fig. 3, it will be noted that the water level is about at the shoulder line of the infant, so that even though the infants head is turned, water will not get into the ears, and even though he turned over on his face, there would be no danger of suffocation or drowning. This desirable condition is abetted by use of the tightly stretched head rest IS. The lower portion of the infants body, however, is partially immersed and with the feet and legs extended straight, they are in a wonderfully convenient position for thorough cleansing and rinsing. Normally when used, as in Fig. 3, member :8 is moved into the shortest adjusted position.

When the device is used in a sink, it has been found very desirable to have the adjustable feature of my device. In this instance the reverse side covering It is uppermost and head rest ll is now on the upper surface. In this instance the frame is supported entirely from the counter surface by members 28 and 22 and their connecting bars 42 and 44 respectively. Here again, however, the level of water W in sink 8, should be so adjusted that the entire head of the infant is out of the water, whereas the lower portion of his body is partially immersed. If We are going to preserve the principles of safety, then it becomes important that the device be adjustable and that the end of the rods as 25 and 21 actually abut the walls of sink S. It has been found that normally, due to the tendency to bend rods 25, there is considerable binding within tubes 32 and 33, so that once in position, there is no danger of them changing their adjustment and making it possible for members 20 and 22 to slip off the supporting surface and immerse the child.

It is believed that it will be clearly apparent from the above description and the disclosure in the drawings that the invention comprehends a novel construction of a support rack for use in bathing infants.

Having thus disclosed the invention, I claim:

1. A reversible supporting rack for use in bathing infants, consisting of: a slack fabric infant sheet for supporting the body of an infant, having open hems on each side adapted to provide passageways for supporting members; head supporting strips, one on each end and on opposite sides of said sheets, providing in use, taut head and foot rests for an infant; tubular side supporting members; a U-shaped frame member having connected foot portions, vertical portions and straight support portions; said straight portions being fixedly secured to said tubular members; a second U-shaped frame member having connected foot portions, vertical portions of different lengths than the vertical portions of said first named U-shaped frame member and straight support portions slidably positioned in said tubular members and with the feet of both of said frame members lying substantially in a common plane.

2. A reversible supporting rack for use in bathing infants, consisting of: a fabric supporting sheet having open hems on each side adapted to provide passageways for support member; head supporting strips, one on each end and on opposite sides of said sheet, providing in use, taut head and foot rests for an infant; tubular side supporting members; a U-shaped frame member having foot portions, joined together by a bar lying in the plane of the foot portions, vertical portions and straight supporting portions; said straight portions secured to said tubular members; a second U-shaped frame member having foot portions, joined together by a bar lying in the plane of the foot portions, vertical portions of different lengths than the vertical portions of said first named U-shapecl frame member and straight supporting portions slidably positioned in said tubular members, with the feet of both of said frame members lying substantially in a common plane, and said straight supporting portions of each U-shaped frame member and 15 2,236,927

the connecting tubular side supporting members forming a common plane angularly disposed to the plane of the foot portions.

CALVIN F. BASHAW.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date D. 149,403 Brecher Apr. 27, 1948 736,032 Silver Aug. 11, 1903 2,089,801 Kennedy Aug. 10, 1937 Thomas Apr. 1, 1941

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US736032 *Mar 26, 1901Aug 11, 1903Silver & CompanyBath-seat.
US2089801 *Nov 16, 1935Aug 10, 1937Kennedy Benjamin HAccessory for infants' bathing devices
US2236927 *Sep 7, 1939Apr 1, 1941Thomas Joseph LCombination bathtub and seat
USD149403 *Oct 29, 1946Apr 27, 1948 Design for a baby bathing device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2815517 *Nov 2, 1954Dec 10, 1957Jr John H AndresenRowing device
US2825911 *Nov 1, 1954Mar 11, 1958Esther TownsleyBaby bathing support
US2836833 *Apr 24, 1957Jun 3, 1958Carlson Elna ABaby bath cradle
US2972752 *Apr 7, 1958Feb 28, 1961Rudolf Leslie EPortable bath
US3097368 *Apr 21, 1961Jul 16, 1963 Portable knockdown cot
US4602394 *Dec 31, 1984Jul 29, 1986Allen Christina LBaby bather
US4766620 *Jul 27, 1987Aug 30, 1988Boyhan Arlene PSmall child's hair washing device
US5067186 *Jun 2, 1989Nov 26, 1991Glenn AyersBaby bidet apparatus with retraction and height adjustment means
US5092001 *Feb 8, 1990Mar 3, 1992Ross Lucy MInfant bathing apparatus
US5406655 *Apr 30, 1993Apr 18, 1995Sahlin; Christine A.Apparatus for supporting an infant during bathing
US5551101 *Jan 27, 1993Sep 3, 1996Leach; Sheryl S.Bath mat for use in bathing others
US5561876 *Jan 23, 1995Oct 8, 1996Petruzella; Steven A.Infant mattress
US5722100 *Nov 20, 1995Mar 3, 1998Jozwiak; Gail R.For use in divided sinks, single sinks and tubs
US6112343 *Oct 23, 1998Sep 5, 2000Evenflo Company, Inc.Infant bathtub with hook
US8313921Dec 10, 2003Nov 20, 2012Ch2M Hill, Inc.Reclaimable hybrid bioreactor
Classifications
U.S. Classification4/572.1, 5/129, D23/278
International ClassificationA47K3/12
Cooperative ClassificationA47K3/127
European ClassificationA47K3/12B1