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Publication numberUS2508822 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1950
Filing dateFeb 12, 1949
Priority dateFeb 12, 1949
Publication numberUS 2508822 A, US 2508822A, US-A-2508822, US2508822 A, US2508822A
InventorsGoldberg Abraham G
Original AssigneeGoldberg Abraham G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suspensible child's chair
US 2508822 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 3, 1950 A. s. GOLDBERG 2,508,822

SUSPENSIBLE CHILDS CHAIR I Filed Feb. 12, 1949 Sheets-Sheet l flau' akaiaw G14. 602114342319,

May 23', 1950 G; GOLDBERG SUSPENSIBLE CHILD'S CHAIR 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 12, 1949 Patented May 23; 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE SUSPENSIBLE CHILDS CHAIR Abraham G. Goldberg, Chestnut Hill, Mass.

Application February 12, 1949, Serial No. 76,099 3 Claims. (01. 155- This invention relates to improvements in a suspensible chair for a child adapted primarily for use in vehicles, such as automobiles, in which the chair may be detachably hung upon the back of a front or rear seat, but which may also be supported upon the back of a chair, sofa, or other type of furniture, or other suitable support. Usual suspensible chairs of this type comprise a frame having a back provided with upwardly extending hook-shaped suspending members adapted to engage over the back of an automobile seat and having horizontal arms extending therefrom, a fabric seat member mounted upon the arms and depending therefrom with a horizontal seat section and a front vertical section secured to said arms to prevent the child from Sliding or otherwise getting out of the chair extending upwardly from the front edge thereof provided with apertures through which the legs of the child are inserted, which when the child is placed in or removed from the chair requires the child to be raised upwardly sufficiently to enable the insertion or removal of its legs from said front apertures.

In modern types of streamline automobiles the distance from the top of the automobile to the seats has been so reduced that when a child is thus raised its head is likely to strike the top and injure or at least annoy the child.

The principal object of this invention is to provide a suspensible chair with a pivotally mounted child-restraining means adapted to be raised above the head of the child so that the child can be conveniently placed in or removed from the front of the chair without so raising the child as to bump its head against the top.

A further object of the invention is to provide an extensible child-restraining means which can be raised well above the head of the child thus enabling children of different ages and sizes to be conveniently placed in or removed from the chair.

Another important object of the invention is to provide a chair of the character described which can be conveniently collapsed into a minimum space for storage in the trunk of the automobile or elsewhere.

These and other objects and features of the invention will more fully appear from the following description and the accompanying drawings and will be particularly pointed out in the claims.

A preferred embodiment of the invention is disclosed in the accompanying drawings, in which,

Fig. 1 is a perspective View of the chair embodying the invention showing the manner lint-5 2 which it is supported upon the back of the seat and the floor of an automobile and illustrating the child-confining device in normal position;

Fig. 2 is a similar view illustrating the childconfining device in raised position;

Fig. 3 is a perspective View of the chair in collapsed position;

Fig. 4 is a vertical median sectional view of the construction illustrated in Fig. 1; and,

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the junction of a rear leg of the main frame, the rear leg-spacing means, a main frame side bar, and a supplemental frame side bar.

A preferred embodiment of the invention which is disclosed in the accompanying drawings comprises a main frame having vertical horizontally spaced parallel short rear legs I connected at their lower ends by a horizontal bar 2 adapted to rest upon the seat of an automobile and having at their upper ends outwardly extending flanges 3 and a spacing bar 4 secured to the upper ends of the rear legs and side bars 5 pivotally mounted upon the upper ends of the legs I and normally extending forwardly therefrom. Front legs 6 pivotally mounted upon the free front ends of the side bars 5 are connected at their lower ends by a horizontal bar I adapted to rest upon the floor of the automobile. An inclined toggle having links 8 and 9 pivotally connected respectively to the legs 6 and side bars 5 is provided with interengaging means l0, which may be a flange on one of the members 8 or 9 extending beneath the other member, for normally locking the arms in alinement. Suspension members I l,which are respectively pivotally mounted upon the flanges 3, extend upwardly parallel to the rear legs and are provided with hook-shaped end portions 12 preferably enclosed in rubber shields adapted to embrace the upper edge of the back of the seat of an automobile, a chair, or other suitable suspending means.

A supplemental child-confining frame is pivotally mounted upon the side bars of the main frame and comprises a horizontal bar l3 having curved end portions merging into horizontal side bars I4 which extend in juxtaposition to the side bars 5 of the main frame, and are pivotally connected at their rear ends to the side bars of the main frame in proximity to the rear legs I. The side bars on the supplemental frame comprise a slotted sleeve I5 which embraces adjacent end portions of the alined sections of the bars of the supplemental frame and is secured to one of said sections with a stud mounted in the adjacent end of the other section slidably mounted 3 in the slot of said sleeve, whereby the horizontal section of the supplemental frame may be extended suificiently to swing over the head of the child.

A seat member of flexible material, such as canvas, comprises a vertical section IS, the respective edges of which embrace the suspension members H and side sections I! which are secured at their upper edges, as by hems, to the forwardly extending side bars 5 of the main frame and a depending horizontal seat section 18 which preferably extends beyond the ends of the horizontal bars of the main section and is provided at its forward edge midway of its width with a forwardly extending flap l9 having adjacent its end the locking member 20.

The horizontal bar of the supplemental frame has secured thereto, as by a hem, or by rivets, a fabric strip ill of like material extending around the curved sections of the bar and provided intermediate of its length with a depending portion 22 having a locking member 23 complementary to that in the flap which extends from the central portion of the seat member.

The side members of the supplemental frame are provided with means such as hook-shaped members 24 rigidly connected thereto adapted to engage over the side bars 5 of the main frame to retain the supplemental frame in horizontal position.

In the operation of the device when the child is to be placed in the chair the horizontal bar of the supplemental frame is pulled outwardly to extended position and swung upwardly to vertical position, the child thereupon is deposited on the seat of the chair, and the supplemental frame swung downwardly to horizontal position and pushed rearwardly to enable the hook-shaped members to engage the horizontal bars 5' of the main frame. The flap l9 and the portion 22 are then placed in juxtaposition and locked thereby enabling the legs of the child to extend through apertures on opposite sides of the flap 19, thus confining the child within the chair and preventing it from sliding forward or otherwise escaping from the chair. When the child is to be removed from the chair the locking means is disengaged and the supplemental frame swung upwardly about its pivot in extended position so that the child can be readily removed from the front of the chair without the necessity of lifting the child in such manner that its head might engage the top of the automobile. After the child has been removed from the chair the chair may be collapsed by swinging the suspension members into substantial parallelism with the plane of the back of the main frame, then swinging the side bars of the main frame downwardly into substantial parallelism with the plane of the back of the chair, and finally breaking the toggles and swinging the front legs rearwardly into approximate parallelism with the plane of the rear legs.

For the comfort of the child suitable horizontal arm rests 25 are" mounted, as by the'brackets 26, upon the side bars of the main frame.

It will be understood that the particular embodiment of the invention shown and described herein is of an illustrative character and that various changes in construction and arrangement of parts may be made within the spirit and scope of the following claims.

Having thus described the invention, what is claimed as new, and desired to besecured by hetters Patent, is:

1. A suspensible chair for a child comprising a main frame having vertical rear legs, means for maintaining said legs in suitably spaced parallelism, upwardly extending suspension members secured to said legs and having rearwardly curved hooked end portions adapted to embrace the upper edge of a wide vertical supporting member, side bars connected to and normally extending horizontally from the respective rear legs, front legs of substantially greater length than the rear legs connected to the front ends of said side bars, a seat member of strong flexible material having a vertical section connected at its side edges to said suspension members, and a depending seat member mounted at its edges upon said side bars and having a horizontal seat section provided midway of its front edge with a flap, a supplemental child-confining fram having a front horizontal bar, curving at its ends into rearwardly extending extensible bars in juxtaposition to the side bars of the main frame and pivotally' connected thereto adjacent to the respective rear legs, means on the side bars of said supplemental frame adapted detachably to engage the side bars of the main frame to hold the supplemental frame in horizontal position, a strip of strong flexible material mounted upon and extending across the front bar and the curvedend portions thereof provided centrally with a downwardly extending portion complementary to the fiapon said seat section, and cooperating locking means upon the said flap and portion adapted when engaged to provide apertures for the respective legs of a child, whereby uponrelease of the locking means the supplemental frame may be swung upwardly above the child-s head thereby to enable the child to be horizontally removed from the chair.

2. A suspensible chair for a child comprising a main frame having vertical rear legs, means for maintaining said legs in suitably spaced parallelism, upwardly extending suspension members secured to said legs and having rearwardly curved hooked end portions adapted to embrace the upper edge of a wide vertical supporting member, side bars connected to and normally extending horizontally from the respective rear legs, front legs of substantially greater length than the rear legs connected to the front ends of said side bars, a seat member of strong flexible material having a vertical section connected at its side edges to said suspension members, and a depending seat member mounted at its edges upon said side bars and having a. horizontal seat section provided midway of its front edge with a flap, a supplemental child-confining frame having a front horizontal bar provided with rearward-1y extending extensible bars in juxtaposition to the side bars of the main frame pivotally com-rested thereto adapted to be swung upwardly to permit the child tobe horizontally removed from the chair, a flap secured to and depending from said horizontal bar, and cooperating looking; means uponsaid flaps adapted when engaged to provide apertures for the legs of the child.

3. A suspensible collapsible chair for a: child comprising a main frame having rear legs provided at their upper ends with: laterally extending flanges, suspension members having flanges pivotally mounted upon the respectiveflanges of said legs and having curved: hooked extensions adapted to embrace the upper edge of a wide vertical supporting member, horizontal spacing bars connecting the upper andlower ends of said legs tomaintain said legs and suspension members in parallelism, side bars pivotally connected to the upper ends of said rear legs and extending forwardly therefrom, relatively long front legs pivotally connected to the front ends of the side bars, inclined toggle members connecting the legs to the side bars, means for normally retaining the toggle members in alinement, a. seat member of strong flexible material having a vertical section connected at its edges to said suspension members and a depending horizontal seat section having sides secured at their edges to said side bars and having a flap extending from the central portion of its front edge, a supplemental child-confining frame having a front horizontal bar curving at its ends into rearwardly extending extensible bars in juxtaposition to the side bars of the main frame, and pivotally connected thereto adjacent to the respective rear legs, means on the side bars of said supplemental frame adapted detachably to engage the side bars of the main frame to hold the supplemental frame in horizontal position, a strip of strong flexible material mounted upon and extending across the front bar and the curved end portions thereof provided centrally with a downwardly extending flap portion complementary to the flap onv said seat section, and cooperating locking means upon the respective flaps adapted when engaged to provide apertures for the respective legs of a child, whereby upon release of the locking means the supplemental frame may be swung upwardly above the childs head thereby to enable the child to be horizontally removed from the chair, and whereby by swinging the suspension members the side arms of the main frame and the supplemental frame into parallelism with the plane of the rear legs, breaking the toggle members, and swinging the front legs in parallelism to said plane the chair may be collapsed to occupy a minimum space.

ABRAHAM G. GOLDBERG.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,621,367 Hawkins Mar. 15, 1927 1,750,435 Silver Mar. 11, 1930 2,399,792 Copp May 7, 1946

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1621367 *Apr 23, 1923Mar 15, 1927Hawkins OrinCollapsible chair and swing
US1750435 *Oct 27, 1928Mar 11, 1930Coleman Silver BChild's seat
US2399792 *Nov 25, 1944May 7, 1946Copp George WChild's convertible chair
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2585721 *Jan 21, 1950Feb 12, 1952Bachand Armand AAuxiliary automobile seat for children
US2613724 *Dec 1, 1949Oct 14, 1952Hugh V HardacreChild's car seat
US2629109 *Jul 18, 1951Feb 24, 1953Goldberg Abraham GBassinet for automobiles
US2651353 *Aug 1, 1950Sep 8, 1953Dean I McwainChild's portable folding high seat
US2772423 *Mar 24, 1953Dec 4, 1956Bunny Bear IncCombination bassinet car bed
US2806511 *Jun 21, 1955Sep 17, 1957Rose Derry CompanyChild's car seat
US2814333 *Dec 3, 1953Nov 26, 1957Morris I GoldbergChild's chair for use either within or outside of an automobile
US2864429 *May 2, 1955Dec 16, 1958John W CombsChild's automobile seat
US3002788 *Jun 16, 1958Oct 3, 1961Rogers Lorraine SuttonHigh chair attachment
US3039819 *Jun 17, 1960Jun 19, 1962American Playground Device CoSwing device
US3237985 *Apr 26, 1965Mar 1, 1966Morris I GoldbergInfant's travelling high chair
US3279848 *May 3, 1965Oct 18, 1966George B WalkerChild's car seat
US3528701 *Aug 28, 1969Sep 15, 1970Pyramid Intern IncBaby carrier
US4018478 *May 15, 1972Apr 19, 1977Volkswagenwerk AktiengesellschaftSafety belt
US4674800 *Feb 6, 1986Jun 23, 1987Ensign Gordon SCar safety seat
US5005526 *Sep 14, 1990Apr 9, 1991Charles ParkerCollapsible vehicle safety apparatus for animals
US5366271 *Nov 30, 1992Nov 22, 1994Shanli CorporationFolding infant restraint seat
US5499860 *Jan 12, 1994Mar 19, 1996Tricor Seating, Inc.Collapsible child seat
US5664833 *Jul 31, 1996Sep 9, 1997Century Products CompanyChild's car seat with improved rotatable overhead shield
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US5954404 *Oct 30, 1997Sep 21, 1999Combi CorporationBaby seat slip down preventing device
US6860557 *Nov 20, 2001Mar 1, 2005Lb Invent AbFootrest for a child safety seat
US6908151Mar 7, 2003Jun 21, 2005Meeker R&D, Inc.Adjustable and foldable booster car seat
US7229132Sep 27, 2002Jun 12, 2007Meeker R & D, Inc.Foldable booster car seat
US7530635 *May 21, 2007May 12, 2009Schramek-Flye Kadie MChild safety seat
US7637568May 14, 2004Dec 29, 2009Meeker R & D, Inc.Adjustable back for a car seat
US7819467 *Oct 14, 2009Oct 26, 2010Schimmeyer Werner KShopping cart seat
US7901003Jun 1, 2007Mar 8, 2011Meeker R & D, Inc.Juvenile convertible car seat
US20110291451 *Nov 24, 2009Dec 1, 2011Holmbergs Childsaftey Holding AbSafety belt buckle and assembly for a vehicle child seat
WO1994012079A1 *Nov 29, 1993Jun 9, 1994Saddlebug CorpFolding infant restraint seat
WO1998056281A1 *May 28, 1998Dec 17, 1998Teresa SharpePortable, collapsible child safety seat for use in a shopping cart
WO2007052077A1 *Oct 30, 2006May 10, 2007Armon LtdChild's high chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/255, 5/94, D06/333, 297/467
International ClassificationA47D1/10, B60N2/26, B60N2/28, A47D1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB60N2/2833, A47D1/103
European ClassificationB60N2/28D2, A47D1/10B