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Publication numberUS2508994 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1950
Filing dateJun 28, 1947
Priority dateJun 28, 1947
Publication numberUS 2508994 A, US 2508994A, US-A-2508994, US2508994 A, US2508994A
InventorsDemick Kenneth C
Original AssigneeGoodrich Co B F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Overshoe with rear opening and tongue therein
US 2508994 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 23, 1950 K. c. DEMICK 2,508,994

OVERSHOE WITH REAR OPENING AND TONGUE THEREIN Filed June 28, 1947 7 222/577 7021 K522225211 .C-DEmiJ/E' Patented May 23, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE OVERSHOE WITH REAR OPENING AND TONGUE THEREIN Application June 28, 1947, Serial No. 757,751

4 Claims. 1

This invention is concerned with an article of footwear such as an overshoe or the like of the rear-opening type. More particularly, the invention is concerned with a rear-opening overshoe provided with a tongue adapted to act as a shoe horn to aid in donning theovershoe.

The objects of the invention include providing an overshoe of the rear-opening type which may be donned without the necessity for soiling the hands, providing an overshoe in which the uppers may be opened sufficiently to permit ready donning and doifing, providing an overshoe having as an integral part thereof means for guiding the shoe into proper position in the overshoe and particularly for guiding the heel of a shoe into the heel pocket, and generall providing an overshoe combining serviceability and pleasing appearance. Other objects will be apparent from the description which follows.

In general, an overshoe embodying this invention comprises uppers and sole portions joined together in a unitary structure in which the uppers is split down the back from the top thereof to the top of the heel pocket, the uppers having closure means for the slit rear zone and having a tongue positioned inside the slit rear zone with a lower portion of the tongue secured to the uppers across the slit and the upper portion of the tongue unsecured to the uppers.

The invention is best understood by reference to the accompanying drawings.

Of the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a rear view in elevation of an overshoe embodying the invention with the upper portion closed;

Fig. 2 is a rear view in elevation of the overshoe in condition for donning and doffing; and

Fig. 3 is a section on line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

An overshoe constituting a preferred embodiment of the invention as shown in Fig. 1 consists of sole I and uppers II portions joined together in a unitary structure. The overshoe has a relatively deep heel pocket I2 with a heel bulge I3 above pocket I2 to conform to the contour of the wearers shoe, the overshoe having a form-fitting ankle-encircling portion I4. The uppers I I is divided along a rear zone by a slit I5 which extends downwardly from the top I6 of the uppers and terminates short of the bottom of the heel pocket I2, preferably terminating near the top of the heel pocket.

Uppers I I is provided with suitable closure means adapted to hold the edges of the divided rear zone in abutting relation, the closure means rear zone of uppers II.

preferably comprising a slide fastener I'I secured to the uppers II along the edges of the slit I5.

A tongue I8 is positioned inside the divided The lateral edges ofthe lower portion of tongue Is are secured to uppers I I on the respective sides of slit I5 from at least the lower end of slit I5 to the top of heel bulge I3. The upper portion of tongue I8 is unsecured to uppers I I, and tongue I8 extends substantially the entire length of slit I5.

The entire tongue is of inelastic material, and

the central zone I9 of the lower portion is relatively stiff while the remainder of the tongue is relatively flexible. The lower portion of tongue I8 is of suflicient width to allow the uppers to be spread out to a considerable extent While donning or doffing the overshoe. The excess width of the tongue folds into generall V-shaped bellows pockets on each side of the stiff central zone I9 when the rear of the uppers is closed. Tongue I8 preferably comprises flexible textile fabric which may be waterproofed if desired. Central zone I9 of tongue I8 is preferably stiffened by an insert of stiff duck fabric extending from the lower end of tongue I8 up to the point where the longitudinal edges of the tongue are unsecured to the upper, i. e., to the top of the heel bulge. The stiffened central zone may be formed by any suitable stiffening means as for example by impregnating or coating a central zone of the tongue with resinous material. This central zone serves as a shoe horn to guide the heel of the shoe into the heel pocket and thus to secure correct positioning of the shoe in the overshoe. The reinforced central zone is extended to the height at which the heel of a shoe first contacts the tongue and prevents undue abrasion of the tongue.

Slit I5 terminates near the top of the heel pocket I2 so that the shoe heel must slide into the proper place in the pocket with the aid of tongue I8. Since tongue I8 serves as a shoe horn, it is not necessary or desirable to extend slit I5 to the bottom of heel pocket I2. Since slit I5 terminates at the top of heel pocket I2, the shoe heel sliding along tongue I8 is always in correct position upon entering pocket I2 and this also forces the toe of the wearers shoe into the toe portion of the overshoe without the necessity of the wearer soiling his hand by pulling on the sole of the overshoe.

Tongue I8 is secured to uppers II up to the top of heel bulge I8 so that the tongue is supported by the uppers throughout the entire zone in which the shoe heel is in contact with the tongue and exerting pressure thereon. Thus, pressure on the tongue in this region tends to pull the overshoe onto the shoe. The unsecured upper tongue portion allows the person donning the overshoe to grasp the tongue easily and pull the overshoe on over the shoe without soiling his hands.

Since the tongue is adapted to act as a shoe horn, it must necessarily be of inelastic material. The fullness necessary to allow the uppers to be opened beyond its normal condition is provided by the bellows pockets of the lower portion of the tongue. The tongue is preferably extended substantially to the top of the uppers so that it also serves as a guard inside the closure means.

When the overshoe is being worn, the edges of the divided rear zone of the upper are held in abutting relation by the closure means and the tongue is entirely hidden inside the uppers so that the overshoe presents a neat and pleasing appearance.

The invention hasb'een described in detail with reference to an overshoe which constitutes a preferred embodiment thereof, but the invention may be embodied in any rear-opening article of footwear where it is desirable to provide means integral therewith for guiding the shoe or" the wearer into the article.

Variations and modifications may be effected within the spirit and scope or the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Iclaim:

1. An overshoe having an upper extending above the ankle and opening along a slit extending downwardly from the. top margin in the rear of the overshoe, said slit terminating short of the bottom of the heel pocket, a shield member adapted to act as a shoe horn underlying substantially the full length of the slit along the inner face of the upper and secured to said upper along both sides of said slit from the bottom thereof to approximately ankle level and extending upwardly free of the upper as a relatively narrow elongated tongue above said level, reinforcing means for stiffening the central zone of said shield member from approximately the bottom thereof to at least ankle level, and closure means for closing said slit.

2.. The overshoe of claim 1 in which a bellows pocket is provided at each side of said shield member in the zone secured to the upper.

3. An overshoe having an upper extending above the ankle and opening along a slit extending downwardly from the top margin in the rear of the overshoe, said slit terminating short of the bottom of the heel pocket, a shield member adapted to act as a shoe horn underlying substantially the full length of the slit along the inner face of the upper and secured to said upper along both sides of said slit from the bottom thereof to approximately ankle level and extending upwardly free of the upper as a relatively narrow elongated tongue above said level, a stiffening member secured to the central zone of said shield member from approximately the bottom thereof to approximately ankle level, and closure means for closing said slit.

4. The overshoe of claim 3 in which a bellows pocket is provided at each side of said tongue member in the zone secured to the upper.

KENNETH C. DEMICK.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,777,137 Blair Sept. 30, 1930 1,839,274 Sundean Jan. 5, 1932 2,024,766 Ingwer Dec. 17, 1935 2,215,880 Lasley Sept. 24, 1940 2,285,751 Tamaki June 9, 19 12 Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,508,994 May 23, 1950 KENNETH C. DEMICK It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows:

Column 4, line 27, for the Word tongue read shield;

and that the said Letters Patent should be read as corrected above, so that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Olfice. Signed and sealed this 3rd day of October, A. D. 1950.

THOMAS F. MURPHY,

Assistant Commissioner of Patents.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1777137 *May 21, 1925Sep 30, 1930Mishawaka Rubber & Woolen MfgFlexible reenforcing
US1839274 *Feb 5, 1929Jan 5, 1932Sundean John MShoe upper
US2024766 *Jun 13, 1930Dec 17, 1935Ingwer Carl HOvershoe
US2215880 *Apr 4, 1938Sep 24, 1940Bert HalberstadtGalosh
US2285751 *Jan 5, 1942Jun 9, 1942Hisaho TamakiPull tab attachment for galoshes
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2619741 *Sep 16, 1950Dec 2, 1952Arnold Clark JohnInsulated shoe construction
US2666996 *Jul 18, 1951Jan 26, 1954Inv Dev CorpOvershoe with gusset and tongue
US2897610 *May 28, 1953Aug 4, 1959Bristol Mfg CorpHeat insulated, gusset-type, water-proof footwear
US3059353 *Mar 6, 1961Oct 23, 1962Endicott Johnson CorpBoot or shoe having water resistant closure and gusset assembly
US3076274 *Apr 11, 1961Feb 5, 1963Brown H H Shoe Co IncCushion boot
US3106030 *Jul 30, 1962Oct 8, 1963Joseph PelosiGolfers club selection aid
US3284931 *Oct 18, 1963Nov 15, 1966Dassler AdolfSport shoe
US4829683 *Oct 30, 1987May 16, 1989Yoshihiro ChikamoriArticles of clothing for use in clean rooms
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/54
International ClassificationA43B3/16
Cooperative ClassificationA43B3/16
European ClassificationA43B3/16