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Publication numberUS2509505 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1950
Filing dateAug 17, 1946
Priority dateAug 17, 1946
Publication numberUS 2509505 A, US 2509505A, US-A-2509505, US2509505 A, US2509505A
InventorsClarence Johnson
Original AssigneeBailey Meter Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Fluid separating and pressure reducing apparatus
US 2509505 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 30, 1950 c. JOHNSON 2,509,505

FLUID SEPARATING AND PRESSURE REDUCING APPARATUS Filed Aug. 17, 1946 FIG. I

INVENTOR. CLARENCE JOHNSON BY MLQM ATTORNEY Patented May 30, 1950 FLUID SEPARATING AND PRESSURE REDUCING APPARATUS Clarence Johnson,

to Bailey Meter Delaware South Euclid, Ohio, assignor Company, a corporation of Application August 17, 1946, Serial No. 691,319 11 Claims. (Cl. 183-39) 1 My invention relates to devices for treating fluids, and more particularly to devices for separating fluids and regulating the pressures at which a separated fluid is discharged to a point of use.

A flowing stream of gaseous fluid, such as compressed air, usually has suspended in it minute globules of water and sometimes of oil. The water comes from the moisture in the air entering the compressor, and the oil is picked up in the compressor by the air. There may be also particles of foreign matter, such as dust, which is carried by the air into the compressor. Control systems using such compressed air are subjected to a rusting action by the water and are apt to become gummed up by the water, oil and foreign matter so that their moving parts become sluggish and inaccurate. It is, therefore, desirable that all liquid and foreign matter be separated from the compressed air before it is delivered to a control system. It is frequently desirable that the fluid be delivered to the control system at a constant pressure somewhat below the supply pressure. The usual pressure reducing valve mechanism includes a valve member which is yieldingly urged away from a seat to permit fluid at supply pressure to flow into a chamber space containing a pressure responsive means which operates at the desired pressure to reduce the unseating action on the valve member. With such an arrangement, the valve member is unseated when the reduced pressure drops below the desired value and, as soon as the valve unseats, the fluid rushing past it produces a jet action which operates to move the valve still further from its seat. As the valve moves away from its seat the jet action reduces and the valve is moved toward its seat. It will be seen that the valve of such a mechanism will be unstable and will be caused to chatter.

An object of my invention is to provide an improved device for separating fluids and regulating the pressure at which one of the fluids is discharged to a point of use. Another object is to provide a separator and pressure regulator having a movable separating and flow regulating member yieldingly urged in a direction to permit the flow of fluid, and operating at a predetermined discharge pressure to cut off the fluid flow. Still another object is to provide an improved device for separating liquids and foreign matter from compressed air and for discharging the air alone to a point of use at a constant reduced pressure. Yet another object is to provide an improved pressure reducing valve 2 mechanism having a valve member which is stable in its operation. Other objects will appear hereinafter in the course of the following description.

In the accompanying drawing there is shown one form which my invention may assume in practice. In this drawing:

Fig. 1 is a. vertical sectional view, with parts broken away to facilitate illustration, of a preferred embodiment of my invention.

Fig. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken on the plane of the line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Referring to Fig. 1, it will be noted that my improved separator and pressure regulator. generally designated I, includes casing members 2 and 3 having flanged portions 4 and 5 clamped to opposite sides of a plate 6, as by screws I. Extending through an opening II] in the plate is a tubular member II carrying a flange I2 which is. connected to the plate, as by screws I3. The tubular member extends into the space I4 at the inner side of the casing member 2 and communicates freely with such space at a point near the upper end of the casing member. The lower portion of the tubular member projects a short distance into the chamber space I5 provided by the casing member 3 and communicates: with such space under the control of a valve mechanism generally designated I6.

The valve mechanism I6 includes an annular member I! which is fixed, as by welding, to the lower end of the tubular member and provides a seat IB engageable by a piston like member I9 reciprocably contained within the tubular member. As shown in Fig. 2, the piston member I9 has curved surfaces 20 slideably engaging the walls of the tubular member and plane surfaces 2I spaced suflicient distances from the walls of the tubular member so as to provide clearances 22 through which fluid may pass freely from one end to the other of the tubular member. Connected to the lower end of the piston I9, as by a bolt 24, is a member 25 having a curved deflecting surface 26 against which fluidis directed as it passes from the lower end of the tubular member through a clearance 21 between the annular member I I and a hub portion 28 of the member 25.

Arranged within the casing member 3 is a casing member 30 which is connected in fluid tight engagement with the lower end of the member 3, as by screws 3|, and has at its upper end a diaphragm 32 clamped between plates 33 and 34, the plate 34 being fixed to the upper end of the member 30, as by welding. At opposite action which also tends to seat the valve.

piston Hi from its seat l8. Formed onthe plate- 31 is a radially extending portion 45 engageable with the lower side of the plate 34 for limiting the upward movement of the diaphragm and the unseating of the piston. The screw 42 may be adjusted manually to regulate the pressure at which the diaphragm operate to hold the piston unseated and to determine, as will be described later, the pressure at which fluid is discharged from the device.

The space within the casing member all isconnected by a port 48 in free communication with the atmosphere, and the space l surrounding the casing 311 communicates with a discharge connection 49 near the upper end of the casing member 3. Fluid, such as compressed air carrying minute globules of water and oil,.is supplied to the chamber space I4 below the upper end of the tubular member H through a supply connection 5%] opening tangentially through the wall of the casing member-2. It will be seen that fluid supplied through the connection 5lwill swirl about in the casing member 2, causing the heavier portions ofv the fluid to adhere to .or .move close to the walls thereof, while the lighter portions, such as air, move to the upper end of the casing and enter the tubular member l I.

To start the operation of the valve mechanism, the screw 42, is adjusted until the action of the springdtlon the diaphragm 32 is such that the piston 19 is normally unseated against the action of the supply pressure on its upper end. With the piston unseated, the air passes downwardly through the clearances 22 about the piston and is directed past the seat !8 against the curved surface 26 on the member 25. The air passing the valve seat produces a jet action which tends to move the valve away from its seat, but the impingement of the against the surface 25 opposesthat action. The dished curvature of the surfacezt is such as to reverse the direction of fluid flow. and such reversal of flow produces an The action of the air stream against the surface 26 and the seating action produced by the flow reversal overcome the jet action of the air passing the valve seat, and hold the bolt 24 against. the bolt 35, thereby preventing any chattering of the piston l-9.

It is especially difficult to separate oil from an air stream because of its high boiling point and insulating properties. These characteristics cause the 'oilto form into microscopic particles having the same charge which prevents them from collecting,.-a property taken advantage of in the well known closed chamber tests in electron charge research. Some of the liquid, especially oil, will therefore'be carried by the air as it passes from the chamber I' l through the tubular member H. I have found that by discharging the air through a high velocity jet and impacting it against a wallat. as close a range as possible, practically all of the oil, as well as other liquids, will'be precipitated out. By utilizing the pressure drop across the valve I make use Of the maximum pressure drop, and consequently of the flow of fluid at its maximum velocity. It will be noted that the fluid is directed against the surface 26 while it is flowing at its maximum velocity, thereby causing a maximum precipitation of liquid on the surface. Since the air passing the valve seat enters a space where the pressure is lower, there is a tendency for the air to release the liquids and effect a more complete deposit of them on the surface 25. The curvature of the surface 26 is such that the .surface tension of the liquid to the surface is sufiicient to prevent its being picked up again by the air stream. The air acts to force the liquid along the surface to the outer edge of the latter, where the air passes upwardly, while the liquid drains downwardly "over the member 25 toward the lower end of the casing member 3. 7

Fixed to the plate 6 surrounding the member 25 is a baffle 52 which causes the air to move toward the lower portion of the chamber [5 where it must reverse its flowagain before gaining admission to the discharge connection 49. Each of the flow reversals aid in the separation of any liquid or foreign material from the air. At the lower end of the chamber spaces l4 and [5 are connections 54 and 55 closed by plugs 56 and 51, which maybe removed for draining away liquids and foreign materials separated from the air.

It will be appreciated that the pressure within the chamber space l5 wilhact against the upper surface offlthe diaphragm, while the lower surface of the diaphragm will be subjected to the action of the spring 40 and to atmospheric pressure throughthe port 48. When the spring 49 is adjustedto raise the diaphragm and unseat the piston IS, the diaphragm will be held raised until the air admitted to the chamber I5 builds up .a pressure therein sufficient to overcome the spring action and the atmospheric pressure. As soon as this pressure is reached, the diaphragm movesdownwardly and permits thepiston to engage the seat 18 and cutoff the flow of air to the chamber space [5. .A reduction of the discharge pressure results in a movement of the diaphragm to unseat the piston. again and admit fluid to .the chamber I5. The discharge pressure may be maintained at any valuebelow the supply pressure by. adjusting. manually the screw 42.

As a result of my invention there is provided animproved separator and pressure regulator for flowing fluids. Adjustments may be readily obtained to limit the discharge pressureto any desired value. The device is comparatively simple and may be easily constructed.

While there is in this application specifically described oneform'which my invention may assume in practice, it willbeunderstood that this formof the same is shownfor purposes of illustration, and that it maybe modified and embodied in various other forms without departing from its spirit or the scope of the appended claims.

What I claimasnewand desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United Statesis:

1. A. :device :of the character described comprising, in combination, two chamber spaces, passage means connecting said chamber spaces in communication with each other, means for supplying to one of. said chamber spaces a mixture of fluids to :be separated, means including a valvememberxfor controlling the flow of fluid throu h said passage means, .means responsive to the pressure in the other of said chamber spaces forselectively positioning said valve member, means fixed to said valve member and including a deflecting surface formed and arranged for reversing the flow of fluid as it passes the said valve member to said other chamber space, and means for discharging fluid from said other chamber space to a point of use.

2. A device of the character described com prising, in combination, coaxiailyarranged chamber spaces, passage means extending axially of said spaces and connecting them in communication with each other, means for supplying tangentially to one of said chamber spaces a mixture of fluids to be separated, valve means for controlling the flow of fluid through said passage means, said valve means including a valve element reciprocably contained within said passage means and a valve seat engageable by said valve element, means including a member fixed to said valve element, said member including a dished surface formed and arranged for reversing the flow of fluid passing said valve seat, means responsive to the pressure in the other of said chamber spaces for positioning said valve element relative to said valve seat, and a discharge connection for the last mentioned one of said chamber spaces.

3. A device for separating liquid from a gaseous fluid and regulating the pressure at which the gaseous fluid is supplied to a point of use comprising, in combination, a pair of chamber spaces arranged coaxially with each other, passage means extending axially of said chamber spaces and connecting the latter in communica tion with each other, means for supplying tangentially to one of said chamber spaces a gaseous fluid carrying liquid to be separated therefrom, valve means for controlling the flow of gaseous fluid and any liquid carried thereby through said passage means, means operatively connected to said valve means and including a dished defleeting surface arranged within the other ofsaid chamber spaces closely adjacent to said valve means for reversing the flow of gaseous fluid and liquid passing from said passage means to said other chamber space, means responsive to the pressure in said other chamber space for positioning and valve means, and a discharge connection in the upper portion of said other chamber space.

i. A device for separating liquid from a gaseous fluid and regulating the pressure at which the gaseous fluid is supplied to a point of use comprising, in combination, a pair of chamber spaces arranged coaxially with each other, passage means extending axially of said chamber spaces and connecting the latter in communication with each other, means for supplying to one of said chamber spaces a gaseous fluid carrying liquid to be separated therefrom, valve means for controlling the flow of gaseous fluid and any liquids carried thereb through said passage means, said valve means including a valve element movable within said passage means, a member fixed for movement with said valve element and having a dished surface against which fluid is directed as it passes the valve element, said surface being shaped and arranged to reverse the fluid flow, means responsive to the pressure in the other of said chamber spaces for positioning said valve element, and a fluid discharge connection for said other chamber space.

5. A device of the character described comprising, in combination, two chamber spaces,'a tubular member connecting said spaces in communication with each other, a piston member reciprocable within said tubular member and providing passage means through which fluid may pass between the ends of said tubular member, a seat engageable by said piston member for cutting off the flow of fluid through said tubular member, means for yieldingly urging said piston member away from said seat, said last mentioned means including a diaphragm, means for sub jecting one side of said diaphragm to atmospheric pressure and the other side to the pressure in oneof said chamber spaces, a dished member connected to said piston and having a surface arranged for reversing the flow of fluid discharged from said tubular member, means for supplying pressure fluid into the other of said chamber spacesyand a discharge connection for said one of said chamber spaces.

6. A device of the character described comprising, in combination two chamber spaces, a tubular member connecting said spaces in communication with each other, a piston member reciprocable within said tubular member and providing passage means through which fluid may pass between the ends of said tubular member, a seat engageable by said piston member for cutting 01f the flow of fluid through said tubular member, means for yieldingly urging said piston member away from said seat, said last mentioned means including a diaphragm, means for subjecting one side of said diaphragm to atmospheric pressure and the other side to the pressure in one of said chamber spaces, a spring acting on the side of said diaphragm subjected to atmospheric pressures, means for adjusting the tension of said spring, deflecting means fixed to said piston and arranged for reversing the flow of fluid as it is discharged past said seat and from said tubular member to said one chamber space, a fluid supply connection for the other of said chamber spaces, and a fluid discharge connection for said one of said chamber spaces.

7. A device for separating liquids from compressed air and regulating the pressure at which the air is supplied to a point of use comprising, in combination, a pair of chamber spaces, passage means connectin said chamber spaces in communication with each other, a fluid supply connection for one of said chamber spaces, a valve member engagable with a valve seat for controlling the flow of fluid through said passage means, deflecting means fixed to said valve member and providing a surface against which fluid is impinged as it passes through said passage means and past said valve seat, means for yieldingly urging said valve member away from said 'valve seat, said last mentioned means including a diaphragm subjected on one side to a constant pressure and on its other side to the pressure in the other of said chamber spaces, and a fluid discharge connection for said last mentioned chambcr space.

3. A fluid separating and pressure reducing valve mechanism comprising, in combination, a chamber space, means for supplyin pressure fluid to said chamber space, a valve member engageable with a valve seat for controlling the flow of fluid through said supply means, a member fixed to said valve member for movement therewith and providing a deflecting surface against which the fluid is directed as it passes said valve seat, means for yieldingly urging said valve memher away from said valve seat, said last mentioned meansfincluding, a. diaphragmsubjected on. one. side..to,a constantpressure and. on itsotherside: to therpressureinsaid'chamber space, and a fluid.

discharge connection for. saidchamber space.v

9. A. fluid, separating and pressure reducing mechanismcomprising, in combination, a cham:

ber space, passage means. communicatingwithj said chamber space. for conducting fluid thereto,

avalve seat surrounding said passagemeans, a.

valvemember arranged within said passage means and .engageable with said seat for controlling the. flowof fluid to said chamber. space, a member.

fixedto said valve member and providing a defleeting surface. in said. chamber against which. the-fluid is directed asiit passes said valve seat to, saidchamber space, and means responsive to the pressure, in said chamber space..for positioning 11. Afluid separating and pressure regulating mechanism comprising, in combination, a chamber space, passage means communicating with said chamber space for; conductingflu-id thereto,- a .valve seat Lsurrounding,,saidmpassage .means, a. valve. memberv arranged within. said, passage: meansat the. fluid supply Side of said valve seat, said valve -membercooperating.v with said valve seat for regulating the flow of fluid tosaid chamber, a member arranged within said chamber and providing a deflectingsurfaceragainst which the fluidiiadirected as it passes'said valve. seat; said lastmentioned member beinggfixed tosaid valve. member for movement. therewith, .and means re-- sponsive to the'pressureiin said chamber. for po sitioning said valve member, said last-mentioned means being arranged to hold :said valve member-- normally in its open position,

CLARENCE J OHNSON;

REFERENCES CITED The following referencessare -of record-mthe filev of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS 1 Number Name Date 1,737,580 Pinkham Dec. 3,1929 1,960,260 Acton May 29, 1934 2,208,261 Jackson July 16; 1940

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1737680 *Sep 1, 1927Dec 3, 1929Condit Electrical Mfg CorpGas and liquid separator
US1960260 *Jan 6, 1933May 29, 1934Russel D ActonAir cleaner
US2208261 *Nov 15, 1937Jul 16, 1940Sherman Jackson Roose CompanyGas pressure regulator
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2666499 *Apr 11, 1951Jan 19, 1954Cleaver Brooks CoCentrifugal separator
US2692026 *Nov 13, 1950Oct 19, 1954Apex Electrical Mfg CoSelf-unloading centrifugal separator
US2705545 *Dec 11, 1951Apr 5, 1955Skf Svenska Kullagerfab AbSelf-emptying liquid separator
US2938539 *May 22, 1957May 31, 1960Baso IncCombined electroresponsive valve and pressure regulator
US2944630 *Feb 2, 1952Jul 12, 1960Eric HoernerAir line filter and automatic drain valve
US4781218 *Jan 29, 1988Nov 1, 1988Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki KaishaValve assembly for use in a fuel tank of a vehicle
US4859218 *Jun 12, 1987Aug 22, 1989Trias Jose RDevice for controlling refuse discharge in textile cleaners
US5219281 *May 18, 1992Jun 15, 1993Copeland CorporationFluid compressor with liquid separating baffle overlying the inlet port
Classifications
U.S. Classification96/400, 251/118, 55/450, 55/462, 137/505.42
International ClassificationF04B39/16
Cooperative ClassificationF04B39/16
European ClassificationF04B39/16