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Publication numberUS2510132 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1950
Filing dateMay 27, 1948
Priority dateMay 27, 1948
Publication numberUS 2510132 A, US 2510132A, US-A-2510132, US2510132 A, US2510132A
InventorsHackley Morrison
Original AssigneeHackley Morrison
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Oscillating fan
US 2510132 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jullie 6, 1950 Hv, Mo'RmsoN 2,510,132

' oscILLA'rING FAN Filled may 27, 194s s sheets-sheet 1 l INI/ENTOR. HAcK YEY MoRRlsoN,

6fm, WQQ, ATTOR N E YS.

Jne 6, 1950 H. MORRISON OSCILLATING FAN Filed May 27, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 1N V EN TOR.

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H. MORRISON OSCILLATING FAN June 6, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 JNVENToR. HACKLEY MORRISON Patented June 6, 1950 UNITED STATES TENT OFFICE 12 Claims.

This invention relates to :electric fans, and more particularly to fans of the oscillating type.

One of the objects of the invention'is tedevise a-novel fan of thisvcharacter arranged to oscillate in a vertical plane.

Another object is to provide a fan of this type comprising a frame having endmembers provided with arcuate edges constituting rockers, combined withmeans for causing the frame to rollback and forth on said rocker-s.

Aiurther objectvofthe invention is to provide a fan of the characterdescrbed which will either oscillate aboutafixed horizontal axis or rock back and forth Aon a.. at supporting surface, as desired.

A still further objectfisto devise an oscillating fan controlled by one or more kgravity operated vanes, pivoted to swing about a horizontal axis.

With the aboverand other objects in view, `and to improve generally 'on` the details of such apparatus, the invention consists inthe construction and arrangementy of parts hereinafter described and claimed, and illustrated, by way of example, Vin the'accornpanying drawings, forming part of this specification, and -in which:

Fig. 1 is an endfelevation-of one form of my improved oscillating fan.

Fig. 2 is a Vfront or longitudinal velevation thereof. Y

Fig. 3 is a transverse-vertical section taken substantially .on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2.

Figs. 4 and 5 are end elevations similar to Fig. 1 but .illustrating vin--dotted lines thefan unit and vanos shown in Fig.` 3 Iand showing the parts in diierent positions.

Fig. 6l is an end elevationfon a small scale somewhat similarto Figs. Lland 5-but showing my improved fan as rolling-on a supportingV surface instead of turning about a. -xed axis, Lthree different positions `of the device being shown in rfull and dotted lines.

Fig. 7 is a siderelevational view showing the device illustrated-in Fig. 6 `as it appears when standing on end. Y

Figs. 8, 9 and 10 yare end elevations similar to y Figs. 4 and 5 but showing three further modied constructions and arrangements of the fan, and

Fig. 11 -is a similar view'showing a 'still further= modied Yarrangement in vwhich 4a single vane is employed instead of the plurality of vanes shown in the other iigures.

Referring to the v`drawings in detail-.and more particularly Viirst to Figs. 1 to 5V thereof, I have illustrated. in these gures what Inow regard as the vpreferrediormof the device.

As shown in the said figures the device comprises a rigid frame made up of a pair ofspaced parallel circular end members I and 2 connected by a beam or girder 3, which may be of-box o1 channel form, and tie-rods 5 and 6. The ends walls of the member 3 are-secured to the end members by means of bolts 4 as shown in Figs. 2 and 3.

The generally cylindrical frame thus constructed is mounted for rotation about a horizontal axis on trunnions 1 secured to thev end members i and 2 and supported inbearings in the arms of a U-shap-ed bracket 8 having at its bottom a broad base providedv by a pedestal 9, preferably spot welded to the bracket.

An electric motor l0 is rmly secured to the supporting beam 3 as by means of bolts Il, and the shaft of this motor, which is disposed at right angles to the axis `of the cylindrical frame, carries at its upper end a fan I2.

It will be seen that the center of gravity of the motor and fan unit just described lies well to'one side of the axis of the cylindrical frame, so that when not in operation the frame and motor tend to take the position shown `in Fig. 3 with the m-otor directly below the trunnions 1 and with its axis or shaft extending vertically. In order to partially balance the frame I preferably secure heavy strips I3 to the end plates at a point on the opposite side of the axis from the motor lil, to act as counterweights.

1t will thus be understood that the device, when angularly displaced about its axis tends to return by gravity to the position shown in Fig. 3, in which the motor is below and the counterweights i3 above the axis. The frame is however preferably almost balanced so that it takes but little force to displace it from its Anormal position. Y

I provide means operated by the air-stream from the fan unit for displacing the frame angularly and for causing it to oscillate about its axis. This means comprises a plurality of fiat straight vanos extending `generally outward and at an angle to the axis-of the fan unit. The inner edges of these vanesare pivotally secured to the rods 6 so that they `are free to swing about such rods, while the outer edges `of the vanes are secured by pivot rods l5 to connecting links-I6.

In the embodiment shown in Figs. A1 to 5 the .pivot rods 5 for the vanes are disposed in an arc.

and constitute weights. The value of these weightsfis such that they serve to hold or maintain the vanes in one or the other of their eX- treme angular positions -against the force of the air stream from the fan unit. In other words, they are suiciently heavy so that they are not moved by this air stream.

On the tie-rods 5 are mounted rubber or other stops or bumpers I1 which serve to limit the angular movement of the vanes about their pivots 6, these vanes being shown in Fig. 3 as resting against the left-hand bumper I1 and as thus occupying their extreme left-hand position.

In addition to the fixed counterweights I3, I may provide an auxiliary movable counterweight I8 which may be employed to adjust the balance of the fan frame as desired. As shown in Figs. 1 and 2 this counterweight is carried by a radially extending arm I9 pivotally secured at 2! to the end member I and provided at its outer end with a resilient detent 2l adapted to snap into and frictionally engage shallow sockets formed on the inner face of a plurality of angle brackets 22 secured to the end member adjacent its periphery. This auxiliary weight I3 is shown in Fig. 1 as occupying its central position. When in this position the distribution of weight on the frame is such that it is loaded substantially symmetrically, tending to return to a central position, when displaced. If however, it is desired to destroy this symmetrical arrangement, and to unbalance the frame so that it tends to swing in one direction further than in the other, the auxiliary weight I8 may be shifted over to and the catch 2i engaged with one of the brackets I22 disposed on either side of the center as shown in Fig. l.

In practice the interior of the cylindrical frame may be enclosed as by means of a woven wire or expanded metal covering 23 suitably secured to the end members.

Current is supplied to the motor IQ of the fan unit by means of a iiexible cord 24 passing through a bushed opening in one of the end members.

In order to hold the frame stationary and prevent it from oscillating, whenever desired, I provide braking means comprising a screw 26 passing through one side of the bracket 8, this screw having a thumb nut 21 on its outer end, and carrying at its inner end a shoe 28 adapted to bear against the outer surface of one oi' the end members.

The device as above described operates as follows. Assuming the parts to be in position shown in Fig. 3, the cord supplying current to the motor is plugged into a suitable outlet and the fan unit starts, and the air stream from the fan impinges against the angularly disposed vanes I4. It will be observed that the vanes to the right of a vertical center line are disposed at a very small angle to the axis of the fan and hence will be acted on to only a slight extent. The vanes to the left of such vertical center line however are disposed at a much greater angle to the axis of the fanand hence the reaction ofV the air stream 4against these blades will be very substantial. This reaction will tend to turn or rock the frame toward the right as viewed in Fig. 3. This displacement toward the right will continue until the frame reaches some such angular position as that shown in Fig. 5. When or just before it reaches this position, the heavy links I 6 have been moved far enough around so that they tend to fall byv gravity and thus shift or swing the vanes I4 about their pivot 6 until the right-hand vane contacts the bumper I1 as shown in Fig. 5. This swinging movement of the vanes reverses their position relative to the axis of the fan unit, so that now the reaction of the air stream is a maximum on the right-hand vanes. This reaction tends to turn or rock the frame back toward the left in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 5. This angular movement toward the left continues until the frame has tilted so far that the weight of the links I6 again comes into action and swings the vanes about their pivot 5 over to the left as shown in Fig. 4, until the left-hand vane engages the bumper Il. 'I'he reaction of the air stream against the left-hand vanes then starts the cycle over again and the frame is rocked toward the right as shown by the arrow in Fig. 4. It will be remembered that, as above pointed out, the links are so heavy that they are not moved by the air stream, but change their position only by gravity at the end of each oscillation, as the frame is tilted far enough to cause them to fall.

While the fan frame has been described so far as oscillating about a fixed horizontal axis, I have discovered that it will also oscillate in a vertical plane when resting on a flat supporting surface such as an ordinary oor. This is illustrated in Fig. 6 in which `29 designates the oor. It will be understoodthat the fan frame, comprising the circular end members and pivoted vanes, is identically the same as above described. The trunnions l are simply lifted out of the supporting bracket 8 and the frame placed upon the floor. It will then rock from side to side on the floor, rolling back and forth on the arcuate edges of the circular end members. It is shown in full lines in Fig. 6 in a position corresponding to that of Fig. 3 while the dotted lines on either side show the frame in positions corresponding to Figs. 4 and 5, respectively. Although the trunnions l have been illustrated in Fig. 6, to show that the fan frame is identically the same as that shown in Figs. 1 and 3, if the device was designed solely for rolling on the floor, these trunnions would of course be omitted.

In Fig. 7 I have shown an incidental novel use for my improved fan frame, namely as a stand or table. Here again if the trunnions 'I are present the device would be supported on blocks or the like 25, whereas if the trunnions were omitted, one of the end members could rest directly on the iioor. Besides serving as a stand or table, the fact that the device may be stood on end, as shown in Fig. '7, facilitates storage, and prevents accidental rolling about when not in use.

Although I have so far illustrated and described my fan frame as being of cylindrical conguration with circular end members, this is not essential. Other shapes and contours of end members may be employed if desired as shown in Figs. 8, 9 and 10.

In Fig. 8 the end member is designated 3l and it is shown as having an arcuate lower edge 3Ic and as having straight top and sides Sla and 3Ib. The frame is illustrated in Fig. 8 as supported on ,trunnions 'I the same as in Figs. 1 and 3.

While, however, in Figs. 1 to 6 I have shown the vanes as arranged in an arcuate series, I have illustrated the vanes in Fig. 8 as arranged in a straight series. Thus the` links I6, when the frame is in normal position would be horizontal, and would serve to swing the vanes I4' from one angular position to the other, when the frame is tilted far enough in either direction to cause the weighted links to fall. In this figure also it will be noted that the `vanes M arezall disposed at the same angle tothe axis ofthe fan unit, and this mayhavean advantagein that the reaction of the air stream against allof the. vanes is the same. y

In Fig. 9 I have shown a fan frame having end members -3l' of a slightly diierent shape,.the lower edges being arcuate as indicated at 3| o, and the top Sid-being flat. As in Fig. 8 the vanes I4 are shown as arranged in a straight series. In Fig. 9 the end members 3 I are shown as resting upon a supporting surface 29, so that the arcuate edge 3|c may-,rocklor roll' thereon. In Fig. 10 I have shown a still further modified form of end members 4I. The upper portion is illustrated as substantially -v trapezoidal, having straight top and sides Ma, and Mb, while the lower edge is arcuate as shown at 4|c and adapted to rock upon the supporting surface 28. This form differs from that shown in Fig. 9 primarily in the provision of laterally projecting portions Md .at each end of the arcuate portion Mc, the lower edges of these projecting portions llld being reversely curved or at least attened. 'Their purpose is to engage the floor or other supporting surface and thus limit the Vextent of angular movement of the frame, in the same manner as is well ,known in connection withthe rockers of rocking. chairs or cribs.

Finally, in Fig. 11 I have illustrated a still further modication in which instead of a plurality of .vanes such as shown in the other figures, I have illustrated the use of a single vane only. This is designatedl and its pivot rod is located in the plane of the axis of the vfan unit. Since there are no links, such as IS, employed in this modification it is necessary to provide the outer end ofthe Vane with a suitable weight 3U, heavy enough to hold the vane in position against the air stream from the fan.

The operation ofv this modification is substantially thesameas that of Figs. 9 and l0, except that the single vane swings back and forth between the two bum-pers il, as the frame is tilted, and the reaction of the air stream alternately on opposite sides of the vane causes the frame to rock or oscillate.

While IA have shown gravity. operated means for shifting the vane or vanes from oneextreme position to the other, it willof course be understood that thesevanes may be shifted by means oi" a lever engaging a stop-pin, in a manner well known in the oscillating .fan art. In that case of course it would vbe necessary to apply to the vane pivots a sufficiently strong frictional resistance to hold them in position against the air stream, after being shifted.

From the foregoing, it Willbe .seen that in all of the modifications described, the fan oscillates in a vertical plane. The effect of this, when the device is placed in an ordinary room, is to stir up and: mix the air throughout the height of the room, thus, when the room is heated, tending to equalize .the temperature of the air adjacent the ceiling-and the f1ooror, in other words to distribute the heat so as to produce a uniform temperature throughout the room. Many other uses and advantages of the invention will readily suggest themselves to those skilled in the art.

What I claim is:

1. An oscillating fan including a rigid frame comprising a pair of spaced, parallel end members, means for supporting said frame for oscillation in a plane parallel with said end members, a motor driven fan unit mounted Within saidfframe between said .end members and rotating about an axis substantially parallel with said end members, and a vane positioned between said end members and extending generally outward from said'fan unit at an angle to the axis thereof, said vane being pivoted at its inner edge about an axis at right angles to said end meinbers, and means for causing said Vane to swing about its said axis andl thus change its angular position relative to the axis of said fan unit at each oscillation of said frame.

2. An oscillating fan including a rigid frame comprising a pair of spaced, parallel end members, means for supporting said frame rfor 0scillation in a planel parallel with said end members, a motor driven fan unit mounted within said frame between said end members and rotating about an axis substantially parallel with said end members, and a vane positioned between said end members and extending generally outward from said fan unit at an angle to the axis thereof, said Vane being `freely pivoted at its inner edge about an axis atvright angles to said end members and gravity operated means for causing said Vane to swing about its said axis, and thus change its angular position relative to the axis of said `fan unit atV each oscillation of said frame.

3. An oscillating fan including a rigid frame comprising a pair of spaced, parallel end members having their edges arcuate aroundat least part of their periphery,l means for supporting said frame for-oscillation in a vertical plane, and with said end members lying in vertical planes, a motor driven fan unit mounted within said frame and rotating about an axis lying in a vertical plane, and a vane positioned between said end members, said vane being freely pivoted at one edge about a horizontal axis disposed adjacent said fan unit and said vane extending generally outwardly therefrom, at an angle to the axis of said 'fan unit, and gravity operated means for causing said vane to swing about its said axis and thus change its angular position relative to the axis of said fan unit at each oscillation of said frame.

4. An oscillating `fan including a rigid frame comprising a pair of spaced, parallel end mem bers having their edges arcuate around at least part of their periphery, means for supporting said frame for oscillation in a'vertical plane, and with said end members lying in vertical planes, a motor driven fan unit mounted within said frame and rotating .about an axis lying in a vertical plane, and a plurality of vanes positioned between said end members, said vanes being :freely pivoted at one edge about parallel horizontal axes disposed adjacentf'said fan unit and extending generally outwardly therefrom, at an angle to the axis of said fan unit, the outer edges of said vanes being pivotally connected and weighted, such weights serving to cause said vanes to simultaneously swing by gravity about their said axes and thus change their angular position relative to the axisof said ian unit each time said frame is tilted to a predetermined extent.

5. An oscillating fan including a rigid frame comprising a pair of spaced, parallel end members having their edges arcuate around at least part of their periphery, means for supporting said frame for oscillation in a vertical plane, and with said end members lying in vertical planes, a motor driven fan unit mounted within said frame and rotating about an axis, lying in a vertical plane, and a plurality of vanes positioned between said end members, said vanes being freely pivoted at their inner edges about parallel, horizontal axes disposed adjacent said fan unit, each of said vanes lying at an angle to the axis of said fan unit, and relatively heavy means pivotally connecting the outer edges of said vanes and constituting a weight, such weight serving to cause said vanes to simultaneously swing by gravity about their said axes and thus change their angular position relative to the axis of said fan unit each time said frame is tilted to a predetermined extent.

6. An oscillating fan comprising a rigid frame of generally cylindrical contour having spaced, circular, parallel end members, means for supporting said frame for oscillation in a vertical plane, with its axis horizontal, a motor driven fan unit mounted Within said frame and rotating about an axis at right angles to that of said frame, and an arcuate series of straight vanes positioned between said end members and symmetrically disposed with respect to the axis of said frame, and each vane lying at an angle to the axis of said fan unit, said vanes being freely pivoted at their inner edges about horizontal axes parallel with each other and with the axis of said frame, and means for causing said vanes to simultaneously swing about their said axes and thus change their angular positions relative to the axis of said fan unit at each oscillation of said frame.

7. An oscillating fan comprising a rigid frame of generally cylindrical contour having spaced, circular, parallel end members, means for supporting said frame with its axis horizontal, for oscillation about such axis, a motor driven fan unit mounted within said frame and rotating about an axis at right angles to that of said frame, and an arcuate series of straight vanes positioned between said end members and symmetrically disposed with respect to the axis of said frame, and each vane lying at an angle to the axis of said fan unit, said vanes being freely pivoted at their inner edges about horizontal axes parallel with each other and with the axis of said frame, and means for causing said vanes to simultaneously swing about their said axes and thus change their angular positions relative to the axis of said fan unit at each oscillation of said frame.

8. An oscillating fan comprising a rigid frame of generally cylindrical contour having spaced, circular, parallel end members adapted to roll on a horizontal supporting surface, a motor driven fan unit mounted within said frame and rotating about an axis at right angles to that of said frame, and an arcuate series of straight vanes positioned between said end members and symmetrically disposed with respect to the axis of said frame, and each vane lying at angle to the axis of said fan unit, said vanes being freely pivoted at their inner edges about horizontal axesparallel with each other and with the axis of said frame, and means for causing said vanes to simultaneously swing about their said axes and thus change their angular positions relative to the axis of said fan unit each time said frame rolls over to a predetermined extent, whereby said frame is caused to rock back and forth.

9. An oscillating fan including a rigid frame comprising a pair of spaced, parallel end members having their edges arcuate around at least part of their periphery, means for supporting said frame for oscillation about a xed horizontal axis, and with said end members in vertical planes, a motor driven fan unit mounted within said frame and rotating about an axis lying in a vertical plane, and ,a vane positioned between said end members, said vane being freely pivoted at one edge about a horizontal axis disposed adjacent said fan unit and extending generally outwardly therefrom, at an angle to the axis thereof, and gravity operated means for causing said vane to swing about its said axis and thus change its angular position relative to the axis of said fan unit at each oscillation of said frame,

10. An oscillating fan including a rigid frame, comprising a pair of spaced, parallel end members, means for supporting said frame for oscillation about a fixed, horizontal axis, with said end members lying in vertical planes, a motor driven fan unit mounted in said frame with its center of gravity below said axis, a vane extending between and pivotally mounted in said end members to swing about a horizontal axis located above the axis of oscillation of said frame, and means whereby the reaction of the air stream from said fan unit on said vane causes said frame to oscillate.

11. An oscillating fan including a rigid frame comprising a pair of spaced, parallel end members having their edges arcuate around at least part of their periphery, to constitute rockers adapted to rest on a horizontal supporting surface, a motor driven fan unit mounted within said frame between said end members, and means whereby the reaction of the air stream from said fan causes said frame to roll back and forth on said rockers.

12. An oscillating fan including a rigid frame comprising a pair of spaced, parallel end members having their edges arcuate around at least part of their periphery, to constitute rockers adapted to rest on a horizontal supporting surface, a motor driven fan unit mounted within said frame between said end members, and rotating about an axis substantially parallel with said end members, a vane pivotally mounted in said frame to swing about a horizontal axis, and means whereby the reaction of the air stream from said fan unit on said vane causes said frame to roll back and forth on said rockers.

I-IACKLEY MORRISON REFERENCES CITED rIhe following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 691,426 Weyant Jan. 21, 1902 859,181 Scott July 2, '7 897,752 Lipps Sept. l, 1908 1,241,600 Aalborg Oct. 2, 191'7

Patent Citations
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US897752 *Dec 28, 1906Sep 1, 1908Peerless Electric CompanyOscillating desk-fan.
US1241600 *Dec 26, 1911Oct 2, 1917Westinghouse Electric & Mfg CoOscillating fan.
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Classifications
U.S. Classification416/100
International ClassificationF04D25/10, F04D25/02
Cooperative ClassificationF04D25/105
European ClassificationF04D25/10C