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Publication numberUS2510701 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1950
Filing dateJan 6, 1948
Priority dateJan 6, 1948
Publication numberUS 2510701 A, US 2510701A, US-A-2510701, US2510701 A, US2510701A
InventorsLa Cross James
Original AssigneeLa Cross James
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Apparatus for cleaning and flushing automobile radiators and the like
US 2510701 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1950 Filed Jan.. 6, 1948 J. LA" CROSS APPARATUS FOR CLEANING AND FLUSHING AUTOMOBILE RADIATORS AND THE LIKE 2 Shee ts-Sheet 1 INVENTOR.

JBMES LACROSS A T TORNE Y June 6, 1950 J. LA 020% APPARATUS FOR CLEANING AND FLUSHING AUTOMOBILE RADIATORS AND THE LIKE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 6, 1 948 m. 1 0 mm N INVENTOR.

JAMES LHCROSS A TTORIVE Y Patented J un e ti, 1950 UNITED STATES. PATENT OFFICE APPARATUS FOR CLEANING AND FLUSHIN G AUTOMOBILE RADIATORS' AND- THE LIKE James La Cross, Shamokin, Pa.

Application January 6, 1948, Serial No. 799

3' Claims. 1

This invention relates to apparatus for cleani-ng radiators of internal combustion engines and other such tubular or cellular structures, and more particularly to an apparatus of the character disclosed in my copending application,

Serial No. 6493499, filed February 23, 1946;

Among the general objects of the present in'- vention are to provide an easily operated, highly efficient apparatus for subjecting the radiator to several: successive types of treatment, each aiming to remove obstructions in and to clean thoroughly the passages of the radiator, such types of treatment including alternately subject- 7 ing liquid and air in the radiator tubes or cells to pulsations tending to dislodge and flush from the radiator all solids causing clogging of the radiator system.

More specifically, it is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus for and systemof cleaning radiators, coils and the like wherein a cleansing liquid is initially pumped through the cells or tubes of the device to be cleaned, following which the pumped column of cleansing liquid is subjected to the ramming action of a column of air to further force the liquid through the clogged cells or tubes to thereby dislodge and carry from such cells or tubes any solids tending to clog the same.

A further and important object of the present invention is to provide an apparatus wherein a plurality of sequentially operated fluid pressure pumps act to alternately pump columnsof water and air into and through the cells or tubes of the heat transfer device to be cleaned, such as an automobile radiator, the air column being employed in the nature of a piston or ram upon a column of water to force the latter through the radiator, the apparatus including valve controlled conduits which insure proper sequential flow of the liquid and air through the system.

Still another object is to provide an apparatus of the character described wherein a plurality of valves'are simultaneously operated by a single manually controlled lever to insure not only proper sequential movement of the liquid andair columns to and through the radiator or the like to be cleaned, but also to provide for reverse movement of the liquid column through the radiator' and the ramming thereof through the radiator by a following column of air.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will appear more fully hereinafter, it being understood that the invention consists substantially in the combination, construction, location and relative arrangement of parts, all aswill be described in detail hereinafter, as. shown in the accompanying drawings and as finally pointed out in the appended. claims.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure l is an end elevational view of the. apparatus of the present invention;

Figure 2 is a side elevational view thereof;

Figure 3. is: a View of the valve-actuating. lever mechanism as viewed from the line 33 of Figure 2;

Figure 4. is a diagrammatic View illustrating operation of the apparatus for introduction of cleansing water to one outlet of a radiator to be flushed; and

Figure 5 is a diagrammatic view illustrating operation of the apparatus when the flow of cleansing liquid is reversed for introduction thereof to the opposite outlet of the radiator.

Referring now to the drawings andv more particularly to Figures 1 and 2 thereof, it will be observed that the apparatus of the present invention is in the form of a compact portable unit comprising an open framework it suitably mounted upon a wheeled understructure II, the framework supporting at its upper end a plurality of fluid pressure pumps l2, I3, is and I5, each in. the form of a stationary cylinder having a single-acting piston movable therein. l'he pistons of the several cylinders are respectively connected by their piston rods 16 to a crank-shaft ll suitably journalled across the top of the frame- Work It, said crank-shaft being driven by an electric motor IS, the drive pulley [9 of which is connected by a belt 253 to the crank-shaft pulley 2'l. The crank-shaft I1 is provided with a plu-- rality' of angularly related cranks 22, 23, 24- and 25, which are respectively operatively connected to the several piston rods It of the fluid pressure pumps l2, l3, I4 and I5 to effect the desired sequential operation of the latter. Preferably, the sequence of operation of the fluid pressure pumps is in the following order: first, pump It; second, pump l3; third, pump I 5 and fourth, pump it, such sequence being indicated in the diagrammatic views of Figures 4 and 5 by the numerals 1, 2, 3 and 4.

The fluid pressure pumps l2 and I5 are de signed to move columns of water through the cleansing system, while the fluid pressure pumps I3 and M are designed to move columns of air therethrough. Because of the aforesaid sequence of operation of these fluid pressure pumps, it will be apparent that the column of water moved by the pump l 2 is followed by a column of air moved by the pump l3, this column of air being then succeeded by a column of water moved by the pump l5, which column of water is then followed by a column of air moved by the pump M. This cycle of operation is continued so long as the apparatus is maintained in operation, so that each column of water which is moved by one or the other of the water pumps l2 and i5 is followed by a column of air moved by one or the other of the air pumps 13 and I4.

Also carried by the framework In of the apparatus are the several conduits leading to and from the several fluid pressure pumps, as well as a sight vessel 26 for indicating the condition of the radiator or other device undergoing treatment and the containers 2? and 28 for receiving the solids flushed from the radiator. The several conduits connected to the inlet and outlet ports of the several fluid pressure pumps are respectively provided with suitable shut-off valves and check valves for insuring proper direction of flow of the water and air through the system, the check valves being automatically operative for unidirectional flow of the fluid therethrough, while the shut-off valves are manually operable by two sets of lever mechanisms 29 and 30 conveniently located and arranged to effect simultaneous actuation of the main shut-off valves arranged in two groups thereof, these mechanisms being respectively operated by the handles 29 and 30 The general arrangement of the fluid (water and air) conduits and of the control valves is best shown in the diagrammatic views of Figures 5 and 6. Referring now to these figures, it will be observed that the device to be flushed and cleaned of accumulated solids and debris, such as an automobile radiator designated generally by the numeral 3|, is connected in circuit with the apparatus of Figures 1 and 2 so that its outlet and inlet ends are respectively connected, by suitable lengths of hose (not shown) to the open ends of the water conduits 32 and 33 (see Figures 1 and 2) forming fixed elements of the apparatus. The system is then filled with water by way of the conventional water-filling opening in the top I of the radiator, a sufficient amount of water being introduced to fill not only the radiator but also all of the water conduits extending between it and the water pumps l2 and 15. These water conduits are represented in Figures 4 and 5 by the broken lines, while the air conduits extending between the radiator and the air pumps l3 and I4 are represented by the relatively heavy unbroken lines.

It will be noted that the water pump I2 is connected by way of water discharge conduits 34 and 35 to the inlet 36 of the sight vessel 26 and that the outlet 3'! of said vessel is connected by the water conduits 38 and 32 to the lower end of the radiator 3|. The upper end of the radiator is in turn connected to the water pump [2 by the water conduits 33, 39, 4B, 4! and 42 all connected in series. The conduits 34 and 42 are connected for common communication by way of the conduit 43 with the single opening into the operating head of the pump l2. Check valves 44 and 45 are included in the branch conduits 34 and 42 to insure unidirectional flow of the water out of the pump 12 by way of the conduit 34 upon outward stroke of the pump piston and into the pump by way of the conduit 42 upon the inward or suction stroke of the pump piston.

The water pump [5 is connected in parallel with the pump 12 to also circulate wat r t a d through the radiator, the single opening in the 7 operating head of said pump l5 being connected to the water delivery conduit by a branch conduit 46 and to the water return conduit 4| by a branch conduit 41. As in the case of the pump 12, the branch conduits 46 and 4'5 leading from and to the pump l5 are respectively fitted with check valves 48 and 49 to insure unidirectional flow of water from the pump to the radiator and thence back to the pump.

A pair of by-pass conduits '59 and 5| respectively interconnect the conduits 38 and 4% to form a closed circuit of four branches, each of these branches including therein a manually operated shut-oil valve respectively designated 52, 53, 54 and 55. The branch conduit connects, as at 56, with a line 51 dropping vertically to the mouth of the debris-receiving container 21, while the branch conduit 38 connects, as at 58, with a line 55 dropping vertically to the mouths of the debrisreceiving container 28. The water system is completed by the provision of a discharge conduit connected to the line 59, this discharge conduit including therein a check valve SI and a manually controlled shut-off valve 62.

The supply of air under pressure from the air pumps l3 and 14 to the radiator 3| is by Way of the conduits represented by the relatively heavy lines shown in Figures 4 and 5. Air is drawn into the operating head of each air pump from atmosphere by way of the check valves 63 and 64, the air being then forced therefrom upon the down strokes of the pumps by way of the check valves and 66. As mentioned hereinbeiore, the air pumps l3 and M operate alternately with respect to the water pumps l2 and I5, air from the air pumps [3 forced by way of the air conduit 61 and through the shut-off valve 88 and check valve 59 into the water line 32 so as to ram the water contained in said line into and through the radiator. By reason of the timed operating relation of the several pumps l2, l3, I4 and I5, the columns of water alternately delivered by the water pumps to the radiator are each rammed by a column of air alternately discharged under pressure from the air pumps, the radiator core being thus subjected to injection of successive columns of water under the influence of a following column of air under pressure. Thus, the water is injected into the radiator and forced therethrough in the form of a successive series of impulses which act to dislodge from the radiator core solids tending to block the free passage of water therethrough.

A second air conduit 10, branching off from the air conduit 61, connects to the water line 33, as at H, said air conduit 10 including therein a shut-off valve 12 and a check valve 13. This second air conduit 10 is operative to direct the air flow from the air pumps 13 and I4 against the column of water entering the top of the radiator 3| when the water fiow therethrough is reversed in direction as shown in Figure 5. For operation of the system as shown in Figure 4, that is, for injection of the water into the bottom end of the radiator, the valve 12 is closed to render effective only the air line 61.

It will be noted that for direct operation of the system, as shown in Figure 4, the shut-oil valves 52, 53 and '12 are closed, while the shutoff valves 54, 55 and. 68 are open. For reverse operation of the system, as shown in Figure 5, the shut-off valves 52, 53 and 12 are open, while the shut-oil valves 54, 55 and 68 are closed. The single discharge valve 62 is always closed duracid-vet his amazin at the apparatus, fire-starve beitl' crease t e iv-hti it is? des res t'd drain the whole system-or water, Whf'r he lfilfisiifig 'arifl mg: er the radiator been completes Fret: erably, the valve 62 is provided with a Kai-idle 14 actives-refit actuation thereof.

It will be understood that any desired lever mechanisms may be employedfor 'efiecting synchronous operation of the valve 52, 53 and 12 and or trrevaives 54", 55' and 6t. m are" arrangement illustrated, the actuating eiis for the valves 52, 53 and T2 are cbiipieel teg'ther for simultaneous operation by a shifting link or red [5; while the actuating levers for the valves 54, 55- and 58 are simultaneously operated by means or link-s15,- TI and 18 pivotall-y secured together, as at 19; these links being commonly shifted valve-opening or valve-closing positions by the handle 29 pivoted to the frame, at 8'3, connected, to the links at their common point of pivotal securement.

In operation of the apparatus of the present invention, having connected the radiator or other such device in water-circulating communication with the conduits 32 and 33 and having filled the water system with water, upon startin the motor l8 the several pumps I2, I3, I4 and I5 reciprocate in the order previously indicated to subject the radiator to successive impulses of water under pressure. Assuming the valves 54, 55 and 68 are open while the valves 52, 53 and 12 are closed, as indicated in Figure 4, Water from the pump I 2 is forced to and through the radiator under positive pressure of the pump by way of the conduits 43, 34, 35, 38 and 32, such Water passing through the sight vessel 25. On the return or suction stroke of the pump [2, the Water is pulled from the radiator to the pump by Way of the conduits 33, 39, 4|, 42 and 43.

Immediately following completion of the pressure stroke of pump 12 the pump l3 operates to force air through the conduit 6'! into the line 32 to impose upon the column of water contained therein a driving force tending to ram the water through the radiator, following which a succeeding column of water is forced under positive pressure to and through the radiator by operation of the water pump I5, this succeeding column of water being delivered to the radiator by way of the conduits 46, 35, 38 and 32, and being thereafter rammed through the radiator by the pressure of air discharged from the air pump M by way of the conduit 61. As in the case of the water pump l2, the water pump l5 also induces a suction pull on the radiator upon the return or suction stroke of said pump to pull the Water from the radiator by way of the conduits 33, 39, 40, 4| and 41. The operational timing of the several pumps !2, l3, l4 and I5 is such that as one of the air pumps forces air under positive pressure to the water inlet end of the radiator the Water is simultaneously pulled from the outlet end of the radiator by the suction pull of one of the water pumps. This cycle of operation is continued until the appearance of the water coursing through the sight vessel .26 indicates that the radiator has been cleared of all accumulation of clogging sediment and solids. freedom with which the water courses through the sight vessel 26 indicates also the extent to which the radiator has been cleared of obstructions to free passage of Water therethrough. As the water circulates through the system, the solids dislodged from the radiator are carried by The degree of the across 5t and: 5t frt'ifti wn-nee may crop by gravity into the conten s- 21 ae'a 28.

It will iiiide'rstbodthe apparatus of the present ihvtion: provides a ernate com or 6? water separated by i emerging cot u'rhiis or" slugs of air, the operat being such that the impulse given to the Wat by the air the or the apparatus for s the water ahead or the air, consequently, a" each swig: ofwater enters t r'adiator it is unue the petusefi a renewing or air is subse= quenu bled trbih the system: through the rash ate-r dvei fiowl- Shduld: the radiatdr 3| be biocltd'tosu'cm errtent that water cannot be pumped therethrough, such condition would be indicated by arise or the water lever the sight vessel 26', this by reasdn of lack of tree circulation ofthewater therethrougli: In such case, the several shut-01f valves are" so reversed to open the valves 52, 53 and 12 while closing the valves 54, 55 and 68, as indicated in Figure 5. Upon such reversal of these valves, the direction of flow of the water to the radiator is reversed from that shown in Figure 4 so that the water is delivered under positive pressure to the top of the radiator and is withdrawn by the suction pull of the water pumps from the bottom of the radiator. This reversal in flow of the water is effected by way of the by-pass conduit 50, the air under pressure from the air pumps [3 and I4 being then delivered to the radiator by way of the air conduit '10, which communicates with the conduit 33 at the point 1|. Except for this reversal in direction of flow of the water and air to and through the radiator, the cycle of operation is the same for the system shown in Figure 5' as it is for that shown in Figure 4. By successive reversals of the system, each end of the radiator may be subjected to the action of the water pumps I2 and I5 successively under positive pressure and suction pull, the application of water under positive pressure being in each instance followed by an impulse of air delivered under pressure by the air pumps [3 and I4.

In Figures 4 and 5, the directions of flow of the water and air through the system are indicated by the arrows, while the condition of the valves determining the direction of flow of the water and air is designated by the letters 0 and C, the open valves being designated 0 and the closed valves C.

What is claimed as new and useful is:

1. An apparatus for cleaning radiators and the like comprising, in combination, a plurality of pumps sequentially operated by angularly related cranks of a crankshaft to alternately force Water and air through the radiator in the form of separate impulses, the water pump being connected in closed circuit with the radiator and being operative to force water into one end of the radiator and draw water from the other end thereof, the air pump being connected to the water inlet end of the radiator, and valve means for directing the water and air unidirectionally through the radiator.

2. An apparatus for cleaning radiators and. the like comprising, in combination, a plurality of pumps sequentially operated by angularly related cranks of a crankshaft to alternately force water and air through the radiator in the form of separate impulses, the water pump being connected in closed circuit with the radiator and being operative to force water into one end of the radiator and draw water from the other end thereof, the air pump being connected to the water inlet end of the radiator, and valve means for directing the Water and air unidirectionally through the radiator, each increment of water delivered to the radiator by the Water pump being subjected to the ramming action of a following impulse of air.

3. An apparatus for cleaning radiators and the like comprising, in combination, a plurality of single acting pumps each having a cylinder and a reciprocating piston, means for operating said pumps in sequentially timed relation, a main water circulating system interconnecting the radiator with the cylinder of at least one of said pumps in such manner that each outward stroke of the piston'of said cylinder forces water into one end of the radiator and each return stroke thereof draws water from the other end of the radiator, and a main air circulating system interconnecting the cylinder of another one of said pumps with the water inlet end of the radiator in such manner that upon each outward stroke of the piston of said other pump a pressure head of air is applied to the water in the radiator.

JAMES LA CROSS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2624354 *Oct 29, 1948Jan 6, 1953Joseph R OkonMachine for cleaning oil cooler radiators, etc.
US2626623 *Mar 3, 1950Jan 27, 1953Tilton Orlo GMachine for cleaning the water spaces of radiators and engine blocks of motor vehicle power plants
US3115145 *Oct 21, 1960Dec 24, 1963Monteath Jr Robert GApparatus for cleaning cooling systems
US3885986 *Oct 19, 1973May 27, 1975Beratherm AgMethod for the chemical treatment, like cleaning or pickling, of installations with at least one steam generator
US4597416 *Sep 19, 1984Jul 1, 1986Scales Frank JAutomotive air conditioning system flushing apparatus
US4606363 *Mar 1, 1985Aug 19, 1986Scales Frank JAutomotive air conditioning system flushing apparatus
US5385613 *Oct 4, 1993Jan 31, 1995Coleman; Larry E.Flushing metal particles using a disposable self-contained pressurized canister of soap solution followed by purging with compressed air
US5392796 *Apr 8, 1994Feb 28, 1995Coleman; Larry E.Apparatus for flushing an automatic transmission cooling system
US5699817 *May 11, 1995Dec 23, 1997Graco IncTurbulent flow conduit cleaning apparatus
US6012422 *Jun 22, 1998Jan 11, 2000Life Automotive Products, Inc.Engine primer dispenser
US7993530 *May 18, 2007Aug 9, 2011The Southern CompanySystems and methods for portable oil filtration
US8147683 *Jan 22, 2010Apr 3, 2012Trico CorporationPortable lubricant filtration system and method
DE3626182A1 *Aug 1, 1986Feb 4, 1988Klein Schanzlin & Becker AgVerfahren und vorrichtung zur reinigung von fluessigkeitsbehaeltern
EP0027980A1 *Oct 18, 1980May 6, 1981Georg Fischer AktiengesellschaftMethod and apparatus for rinsing, cleaning, disinfecting and coating a conduit on the interior, especially a water conduit in a new construction
WO1986004530A1 *Jan 18, 1986Aug 14, 1986Alfred KuchA process and device for cleaning a pipe-line
Classifications
U.S. Classification134/95.1, 134/22.18, 134/30, 134/168.00R, 134/21, 134/22.19, 417/539, 134/17, 134/37
International ClassificationB08B9/032, B08B9/02
Cooperative ClassificationB08B9/0323
European ClassificationB08B9/032B4