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Publication numberUS2510799 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1950
Filing dateFeb 5, 1948
Priority dateFeb 5, 1948
Publication numberUS 2510799 A, US 2510799A, US-A-2510799, US2510799 A, US2510799A
InventorsCarley Paul M
Original AssigneeCarley Paul M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Musical instrument support
US 2510799 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1950 CARLEY 2,510,799

MUSICAL INSTRUMENT SUPPORT Filed Feb. 5, 1948 I? y W/INVENTOR. BY

Patented June 6, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE MUSICAL iNsTRUMENT 'shPPoR'r Paul M. CarleyjRu'therford, N.'J.

Application February 5, 1948, Serial No. 6,413

(Cl. sl-=32 '6 Claims. 1

Thezpresent invention relates to stringed musical instruments of the type in which the strings *are plucked and more particularly to a'device to adapt the instrument for quick detachable conne'ction with a suitable supporting harness.

While the present invention may be applied to other stringed musical instruments such as banjos, ukuleles, mandolins and the like,-it is particularly adapted for use with guitars which are relatively heavy and 'quite bulky. When a music'ian plays several different instruments in an orchestra including a guitar, it is desirable to be able to shift from one instrument to another quickly yet support the weight of the instrument so as to relieve the musician from fatigue. Also, when-an orchestra leader playssolo arrangement on a guitar in standing position, it is essential that hebe able to remove the instrument quickly and smoothly to immediately turn his attention to leading the orchestra. When guitars are played in a standing position they are usually supported by a bandolier extending around one shoulder of the musician and attached to the neck and body of the instrument. To remove the guitar it is necessary to lift the bandolier over the head with one hand While holding the instrument with the other hand and such removal of the bandolier is awkward and time consuming.

'One of the objects of "the'presentinvention is to provide a device for supporting a musical instrument of the type indicated from a suitable harness such as a neck strap while permitting a quick and easy attachment to and detachment from the harness. v

Another object is toprovide a supporting device of the type indicated which may be applied to the musical instrument as an attachment and adjusted to fit instruments of different shapes and sizes.

Still another object is to provide a supporta ing attachment of the type indicated which is inconspicuous and unharmful to the instrument or tone and one which balances the instrument 'in playing position.

These and other objects will become more apparent from the following description anddrawing in which like reference characters denote like parts throughout the several views. It is to be expressly understood, however, that the drawing is for the purpose of illustration only and not a definition of the limits of the invention, reference being had for this purpose to the appended claims. In thedrawing:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of-aiguitar'su-pported 2 in playing position from a neck strap in accorda 'nce with the present invention Fig. 2 is a rear View of the guitar showing th'e supporting device of the present inventionapplied thereto;

Fig. '3 -is a 'se'ctiona1 view on line 3-3 (if 'Fig. 2 showing the depending h'ook-or a neck strap at t'ache'd to the end of a bar of the supporting de- "vice;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged view of the lower end of the -supporting device showing the adjustable e'xteusien arm and clamping'bracke't for fitting the device'to the instrument;

Fig. -5 is an enlarged view of the adjusting 'means for the ex 'tens'ion arm and clamping brackets;

Fig. 6 is a partial View of a supporting device o: iho'dified construction in which the angular side armsare'pivotally'connected to the supporting bar onthe sa me pivot; and

Fig. 7 is 'a'view similar to Fig.6 showing'a further modified construction in which the angular s'lfle arms are "rig-idly connected to each other.

In the dr'awing, the present inventio'nis shown applied to a guitar III! to-a'dapt'it to be supported rrtm a suitable harness illustrated in the form of a-neck strap H having a hook [2 at its end. It at be understood, however, that the present in- "-vention' ma'y be applied to other stringed inst-n1- "mehts of the type which are held in playing positio'n *at an angle between the horizontal and vertical as illustrated generally in Fig. '1. The neck strap ll extends around the back of the neck of the musician and has depending incoh- 'spicuous cords forming a loop at their lower end to which the hook I2 is connected. Preferably, the neck strap or harness II is adjustable in length to adapt it for particular individuals.

In accordance 'with'the present invention a device or fitting mounted on the guitar or other stringed musical instrument as an attachment provides a quick detachable connection with the hook l2 on which the instrument is supported and'balanced in playing position. The supporting device or fitting is in the form of a bar l3, see Fig. 2, extending across the back of the instrument at such an angle as to hang substantially vertical when the instrument is in playing position. The upper end of the bar I3 is offset rearwardly from the back of the instrument and 'h'a'san eye 14 formed in the ffset portion through which the hook -12 of the neck strap H may be-quickly'inser'ted'orremoved, see Figs. 2 and'3.

the 'er'n'bodiment of the invention illustrated "in Figs. '1 to '5, theba'r l3 is'mounted on "the fin of the guitar.

s'trument by arms I5, l6 and Il extending from the bar and having right-angular portions overlying and embracing the sides of the instrument. As illustrated in detail in Fig. 4, the arm I constitutes an extension of bar I? and has a portion I8 overlying the lower end of the bar and a right-angular portion I9 underlying the bottom side b of the instrument, see Fig. 3. The face of the right-angular portion I 9 is angled to adapt it to conform to the curvature of the side of the instrument which it underlies. The extension arm I5 is clamped in adjusted position on the lower end of the bar It by means of a screw projecting through a slot 2| in the arm and screwed into a tapped hole in the bar. Preferably, the end of the screw 23 is peened or headed over to limit the movement of the screw, see Fig. 5. A clamping bracket 2?. is adjustably mounted on the right-angular portion IQ of the extension arm I5 and has an angular end portion 23 adapted to overlie the front of the instrument. Clamping bracket 22 is attached to the horizontal portion I9 of the extension arm I5 by a screw and slot connection 2 25, like that illustrated in detail in Fig. 5.

The arms I6 and I! have one of their ends pivotally connected to the bar It adjacent the eye I4 in spaced relation to each other and extend outwardly from opposite sides of the bar. Clamping brackets 26 and 27 similar to bracket 22 are adjustably mounted on right-angular portions of the arms I6 and II by pin and slot connections, like that illustrated in Fig. 5. The clamping brackets 22, 2E and El are adjusted to closely fit the sides of the guitar and the extension arm I5 is adjustable along the bar I3 to fit the device on the instrument.

The bar I3, arms I5, I6, I? and clamping brackets 22, 26 and 21 may be made of any suitable thin material but preferably are made of thin strips of metal ornamented by plating or the like, and the heads of the adjusting screws are made comparatively fiat so that the device does not interfere with the proper holding of the instrument. The supporting device is inconspicuous as only the ends of the clamping brackets 22, and 2'! can be seen on the front of the instrument and only three narrow strips at the sides. Preferably, felt strips 39 underlie the bar I3, arms I5, I5, I! and clamping brackets 22, 26 and 2'! so as not to mar the finish on the body of the instrument.

Toapply the supporting device to the guitar III, the screw 21! is loosened and the extension arm :5 is slid along the bar I3 to permit the clamping brackets 22, 2t and 2? to be passed over the sides of the instrument. With the device loosely held in place on the instrument, the upper end of the bar 13 is attached to the hook I2 of the neck strap Ill and the lower end of the bar is moved along the bottom side b of the instrument until the latter balances in playing position on the hook I2. The extension arm I5 may then be slid along the bar I 3 and the arms I6 and Il swung outwardly on their pivots until they engage the sides of the guitar while the latter is held in playing position. The screw 28 is then tightened to clamp the extension arm IE in adjusted position and each of the clamping brackets 22, 26 and 21 may be adjusted on the arms to engage their outer ends tightly with the front Thus, with the adjustable extension arm I5 and adjustable clamping brackets 22, 26 and 21, the supporting device may be applied to instruments of different sizes and shapes to adapt it for universal application. When the supporting device is properly positioned on the instrument, the latter will balance in playing position on the hook l2 without support by either hand. Also, because of the hook and eye connection I2, I4, the instrument may be quickly attached to or detached from the neck strap with ease and smoothness.

In Fig. 6 a modified construction is illustrated in which the side arms It and I? are connected to the bar I3 on a single pivot til. Such an arrangement simplifies the construction while permitting adjustment of the bar I3 to balance the instrument in playing position.

In Fig. '7 a further modified construction is illustrated in which the arms I6 and I? are formed as a single integral piece pivotally connected to the bar on the pivot 46. Such a construction permits some adjustment of the position of the bar I3 but does not provide the flexibility of adjustment that may be obtained with the arrangement illustrated in Figs. 1 to 5. However, the device illustrated in Fig. 7 is well adapted for instruments of one size and shape.

It will now be observed that the present invention provides a device for supporting and balancing a stringed musical instrument in playing position while permitting quick attachment to or detachment from a supporting harness. It

' will also be observed that the supporting device of the present invention is adjustable to adapt it to fit instruments of different sizes and shapes. It will still further be observed that the supporting device of the present invention is inconspicuous from the front of the instrument, balances the instrument in playing position and is unharmful to the instrument or tone.

While three diiferent forms of construction have been illustrated and described, it will be understood that further modifications may be made in the construction and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. Therefore, without limiting myself in this respect, the invention is defined by the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a stringed musical instrument of the type in which the strings are plucked, a device for supporting the instrument from a neck strap having a hook at its end comprising a bar attached to the back of the instrument with one end offset therefrom and having an eye providing a quick detachable connection with the hook at the neck strap, and said bar extending at an angle across the back of the instrument and being so positioned thereon as to balance the instrument in playing position on the hook of the neck strap.

2. In a stringed musical instrument of the type in which the strings are plucked, a device for supporting the instrument from a neck strap comprising a bar extending across the back of the instrument and having a bracket at its lower end underlying the side of the instrument, said bar havin means at its upper end providing a quick detachable connection with the neck strap, and arms extending angularly from opposite sides of the bar and having clamping brackets overlying the sides and front of the instrument.

3. In a stringed musical instrument of the type in which the strings are plucked, a device for supporting the instrument from a neck strap having a hook comprising a bar extending across the back of the instrument with one end offset and having an eye to provide a quick detachable connection with the hook of the neck strap. an

extension arm at the lower end of the bar and having a clamping bracket underlying the side of the instrument, arms extending angularly from opposite sides of the bar adjacent the eye, and clamping brackets at the ends of the arms overlying the sides and front of the instrument, said extension arm being adjustable along the bar and said clamping brackets being adjustable on each arm whereby to adapt the device to be applied to musical instruments of different shapes and sizes.

4. A device for supporting a guitar on the depending hook of a neck strap comprising a bar extending across the back of the guitar with its upper end offset and having an eye to provide a quick detachable connection with the hook of the neck strap, an extension arm at the lower end of the bar having a clamping bracket underlying the side of the instrument, arms pivotally connected at spaced points along the bar adjacent its upper end and said arms extending angularly from opposite sides of the bar, and clamping brackets at the ends of the arms and overlying the sides and front of the guitar, said extension arm being adjustable along the bar and said clamping brackets being adjustable on each of the arms whereby to adapt the device to be applied to guitars of different shapes and sizes.

5. A device for supporting a guitar on the depending hook of a neck strap comprising a bar extending across the back of the guitar with its upper end offset and having an eye to provide a quick detachable connection with the hook of the neck strap, an extension arm at the lower end of the bar having a clamping bracket underlying the side of the instrument, arms pivotally connected to the bar at the same point and extending angularly from opposite sides of the bar,

and clamping brackets at the ends of the arms and overlying the sides and front of the instrument, said extension arm being adjustable along the bar and said clamping brackets being adjustable on each of the arms whereby to adapt the device to be applied to guitars of different shapes and sizes.

6. A device for supporting a guitar on the depending hook of a neck strap comprising a bar extending across the back of the guitar with its upper end offset and having an eye to provide a quick detachable connection with the hook of the neck strap, an extension arm at the lower end of the bar having a clamping bracket underlying the side of the instrument, arms rigidly connected to each other and to the bar and extending angularly from opposite sides of the bar, and clamping brackets at the ends of the arms and overlying the sides and front of the guitar, said extension arm being adjustable along the bar and said clamping brackets being adjustable on each of the arms whereby to adapt the device to be applied to guitars of different shapes and sizes.

PAUL M. C'ARLEY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 241,195 Cubley May 10, 1881 1,586,251 Lang May 25, 1926 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 577,160 France Sept. 1, 1924

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US241195 *May 10, 1881 Hook attachment to drums
US1586251 *Sep 19, 1925May 25, 1926Lang Albion SlaytonSaxophone-supporting cord
FR577160A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2559200 *Oct 25, 1949Jul 3, 1951Schaf Leonard EGuitar stand
US2643039 *Aug 17, 1949Jun 23, 1953Sottile Samuel RobertGuitar and sling combination
US2736225 *Apr 1, 1952Feb 28, 1956 Bass viol cart
US4037815 *Jul 19, 1976Jul 26, 1977D & J ProductsMusical instrument support
US4247029 *Aug 30, 1979Jan 27, 1981Levin Jeffrey SStringed musical instrument and frame therefor
US5069103 *Sep 10, 1990Dec 3, 1991Healy Brian CStringed instrument support device
US5202527 *Jun 24, 1991Apr 13, 1993Gracie John DGuitar stanchion
US6441283 *Feb 28, 2000Aug 27, 2002Thomas ScottSupport for round back stringed instrument
US7394006 *Feb 18, 2004Jul 1, 2008Technoplast S.R.L.Supporting element for string musical instruments
US7423212Nov 9, 2006Sep 9, 2008Gallagher Kevin TInstrument support structure
US7491876Oct 25, 2005Feb 17, 2009Michael G. PeacockGuitar strap and method of making guitar strap
US8373051 *Apr 24, 2009Feb 12, 2013Harald GillisSystem for adding a string to a stringed instrument
US20060086232 *Oct 25, 2005Apr 27, 2006Peacock Michael GGuitar strap and method of making guitar strap
US20070068362 *Feb 18, 2004Mar 29, 2007Riccardo BordignonSupporting element for string musical instruments
US20070289430 *Nov 9, 2006Dec 20, 2007Gallagher Kevin TInstrument support structure
US20110283861 *Apr 24, 2009Nov 24, 2011Harald GillisSystem for adding a string to a stringed instrument
US20120012717 *Jul 16, 2010Jan 19, 2012Jonathan David MasonMusical Instrument Stand
USRE31722 *Mar 11, 1982Nov 6, 1984 Stringed musical instruments
Classifications
U.S. Classification84/327, 984/257
International ClassificationG10G5/00
Cooperative ClassificationG10G5/00
European ClassificationG10G5/00