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Publication numberUS2510848 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1950
Filing dateJul 29, 1947
Priority dateJul 9, 1940
Publication numberUS 2510848 A, US 2510848A, US-A-2510848, US2510848 A, US2510848A
InventorsHarold Wood Charles
Original AssigneeHarold Wood Charles
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Means enabling aircraft night-landing practice to be conducted in daylight
US 2510848 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2,510,848 CRAFT NIGHT-LANDING PRACTICE g. H.WOOD

CONDUCTED IN DAYLIGHT Filed July 29. 1947 IEANS ENABLI To & F o.

June 6, 1950 Patented June 6, 1950 MEANS ENABLINGAIRCRAF-TJNIGHEB-LAND- ING PRACTICE TO DAYLIGHT BE CONDUCTED IN (lharles'Hnl-old Wood, Bradford, England Application July 29, 1947, Serial Nix/764,284 In Great Britain July. 9, 1940 Section 1,.vlublio Law 690, August 8, 1946 Patmtroxpires July 9, 1860- 17 Claims.

This invention relates toapparatuadesigned to enable aircraft night-landing practice to .be conducted in daylight, such apparatus comprisingsome iorm of light-filter to cut-oil daylight from the pilot or pupil, but to transmit the light irorn some=distant light source. The most obvious method of. restricting the light reaching thepilot .is-the use-oi very dense "dark glasses" of any .colour. orof neutral colour; but if these glasses are dense enough to restrict daylight to a negligible amount. only intensely brilliant light can be seen byhim at anygreatdistance. i. e., the sun. director reflected. or brilliant focused light-or searchlights .directed towards him. As such neutral colour filters restrict all terms of light (daylight orartificial) .almost to the same extent. it is only the intense brilliance of a focused light which enables a minute fraction oi. it to penetrate the filter.

.It has been found possible b usinga. number "absorption" filters intercepting light in succession and each capable of cutting off a specific range of wavelengths. to restrict the light reaching the pilot so that only one narrow band of known wave-length is transmitted freely. Daylight filtered by these absorption" filters becomes virtually invisible because it contains so little light of that particular wave-length. Strong monochromatic light of that particular wavelength, however, remains visible.

According to the present invention, apparatus for practicing night-landing in daylight comprises one or more lamps emitting a strong light of a particular wavelength'to i'orm a flare path and/or to serve as other ground'lights, and a compound light absorption filter, or a combination of separated filters. adaptedto restrict daylight visibllity to a negligible amount while-allowing adequate visibility oi the said lamp' or lamps. Preferably, the light absorption filters have abruptly cut-oil! transmission-bands oi'the spectrum having a common transmission overlap only at and near the strong emission-wavelength oi the said lamp or lamps. The-said lamp or lamps may be monochromatic. The monochromatic lamps may be sodium-vapour electric discharge lamps, or other lamps producing brilliant light at the sodium wavelength.

The filters may be arrangedin any convenient manner relatively to'the pilot or'pupil; e.g., one

filter may be associated with all'light entrances to that part 01' the aircraft within'the vision of the pilot and anotherfilter may be disposed so that all light reaching the eyes of the-pilot or pupil must pass therethrough. One filter may be associated with the windscreen. or incorporated in a hood adapted to fit around and over the pilot or pupil. and another may be carried'iy goggles worn by him. Alternatively. filter-sums berarranged only on the windscreen-or hood. or only on gog les worn by the pilot or pupil.

Referring-now to the accompanying drawing in which an embodiment of the invention is shown- :Eig. 1 illustrates diagrammatically light passing; through a neutral cc'our filter;

Fig. 2 illustrates diagrn *unaticallv light passinglthrough. a compound absorption .filter;

Eig. 3 illustrates the absorption-curves oi-the filter groups employed;

.Fig. .4 shows two groups of filters located on the goggles;

Fig.5 shows twogroups of separated filters dividedaand located one on the goggles andone on=the aircraft windscreen;

.i'ig. 6 shows aportable inner hood withinthe aircrattcockpit to receive one or both of :the filter. groups.

Referring to Fig. 1, 2 illustratesa neutral colour filter and itseffect of reducing, in equal proportions, all the wavelengths 3 of daylight 4 and a light source comprising sodium light 5: the diagrams-6. and 1 show the relative volumes of daylight and. sodium light which reach the observers eye. .It is apparent that. the use of neutral colour" filters is not suitable, due to the almost equal dimming of all wavelengths andrthe efiect oi minimizing the intensity of a given light source so that it is-visible at. only a very short distance. 011 the other hand the use-of sodium lamps is eminently-suitable due to their monochromatic property. i. e., the whole 01 the light is of one wavelength approximately 5890 A. U. :Furthermore the sodium waveiengthisolated isnear the point of the spectrum at which the human eye possesses itsgreatest visual acuity. It will thereiorebe apparent that it suitable absorption filters are combined to suit given light conditions. daylight visibility-may be restricted toe negligible-amount, but a small "gap" may be provided in the compound filter which coincides with wavelengths approximately 5890 A U.. and'the sodium light will pass freely through. Fig. 2 shows the eifectoia combination of absorption filters forming a compound filter =8 upon the wavelengths 3 of the daylight 4 and a sodium light source-"5. Each of the flltersinithe combination withholds certain wavelengths so as to form a gap'lowhich aflords free passage-tor the wavelength band E31: of the sodium light :5. It

will be seen that the volume of sodium light visible to the eye after filtration is relatively larger than the volume of daylight so visible. Daylight may therefore be so reduced as to obtain reasonable night-time" darkness and yet leave sodium lamps visible a considerable distance away.

The compound filter must necessarily include several difierent dyes, each absorbing specific wavelengths; although it is immaterial whether all the filters are combined into one multiple filter, or, to provide other advantages, are used in two separate groups. The result is the same so far as invisibility of daylight and visibility of the special lamps are concerned. It has been found that certain filter dyes known commercially as Ilford colour filter dyes Nos. 204, 404

and 812 provides the required result. The employed arrangement of dyes is Nos. 404 and 812 approximately in the proportion of 1:1, and Nos. 204 and 812 in the same proportion giving a compound filter (or combination) of 404, 204 and 812 approximately in the proportion of 1:1:2.

In Fig. 3 is shown the absorption curves of two filter groups separately and in combination. The difierent wavelengths of visible light, which together combine to form white light, have each a difierent colour or shade of colour of their own as shown by the diagrammatic representation of the spectrum 9 which includes the wavelength scale ID. The light absorption filters each have abruptly cut oil transmission bands of the spectrum and the transmission bands very slightly overlap at, and near, the wavelength of the monochromatic light. The filters are divisible into two groups, marked respectively H and I 2. All the filters in group II, singly or in multiples, allow short wavelength visibility of daylight subjects. The portion I3 shows approximately the light transmitted extending over a wavelength range of about 5,600 A. U. to 6,000 A. U. with maximum transmission at or near 5890 A. U. and allows visibility of greenish brown colour. All the filters in group I2, singly or in multiples, allow longer wavelength visibility. The portion ll shows approximately the light transmitted extending over a wavelength range of approximately 5,800 A. U. to 6,200 A. U. with maximum transmission at or near 5890 A. U. and allows visibility of reddish brown colour. When the filter groups are combined as at It then visibility is allowed only close to the sodium wavelength line It (5890 A. U.)

The group of filters ll, l2 may be arranged as desired, for example all the filters may be applied in fixed relationship to a pilot's goggles but this has certain disadvantages particularly in rendering difilcult the viewing of instrument panels 11. To remove this difilculty, a sodium lamp in the aircraft may be employed to illuminate the instrument panel. In Fig. 4 the filters are shown superposed partly on a hinged screen it of a pilot's goggles I9 and partly on the fixed screen 20: this enables the degree of visibility to be altered at will. Alternatively, as shown in Fig. 5, the filter group II may be associated with the windscreen 2i, hood 22 and side windows 23 of the aircraft cockpit and only the group I2 associated with the goggles It. The remaining transparent portions of the cockpit are blackedout in any suitable manner. This latter arrangement may be further modified as shown in Fig. 6 wherein the filter group H is associated with an inner screen and hood 24, the remaining portion of which excludes daylight and afiords a clear view or the instrument panel II. If desired the 4 filter ll may be on the windscreen 2|, hood 22 and windows 23 and the filter l2 on the inner screen and hood 24. The order of the filters may be reversed in any of the above arrangements and such filters can be in alternative interchangeable densities to suit varying conditions and stages of training. Goggles of the above type shown in Fig. 4 may have filters of only one group thereon and the filter density may be varvled at will by the adiustment of the hinged filter II. A large range of densities can be provided by alternative gog les and hood and windscreen panels so that any degree of dayli ht-darkness can be produced easily on different types of days.

By arranging only one group. or none, of the filters on the goggles. easy visibility of the instrument panel is afforded by li hting it with light which renders it visible to the pilot or pupil. If the filters in group I2 are provided on the go les. daylight may be admitted to the cockp t to fall only onto the instruments or suitable artiflcal lighting em loyed.

Sodium-vapour electric dischar e lamps, or other lamps producing brill ant light at the sodium wavelength. may be arranged in parabolic or other suitable reflectors to form a "flare ath on an aerodrome. The said lamps could also be used as other ground li hts. Such lamps would appear bright to a pilot using the above filters, who, at the same time, would be unable to see daylight-illuminated detail on the ground.

The simplicity and economy of sodium-vapour electric discharge lamps makes them eminently suitable for use as a main line of "landing flares" although homing" beacons may comprise a source oi intensely brilliant white light.

What I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. Apparatus for practicing night-flying aircraft in dayli ht comprising a compound light absorption filter including separated light absorption filters of different and substantially com lementary wavelength-absorption characteristics to be associated respectively with an aircraft and a pilot therein, said filters being located in series in an aircraft pilot's line of si ht to the exterior of the aircraft and one of said filters being outside of the pilot's line of sight to instruments within the aircraft, thereby to restrict exterior daylight vision of an aircraft pilot to a negligible amount while allowing adequate interior visibility of illuminated instruments for his guidance in accurate flying.

2. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein one of the light filters is associated with at least some of the light entrances to that part of the interior of an aircraft within the vision of the pilot and another filter is disposed so that all light reaching the eyes of the pilot must pass therethrough.

3. Apparatus according to claim 1, wherein one of the component filters is associated with an inner screen within at least some of the light entrances of an aircraft structure within the vision of the pilot.

4. Apparatus according to claim 1 wherein said separated filters are of a greenish brown color and a reddish brown color respectively when viewed by daylight separately, the brown colored ingredient in the said filters being a monochromatic dye having optimum spectral transmission at approximately 5,890 A. U.; whereby sodium lights at the exterior of the aircraft are visible to the pilot through said serially located filters.

5. Apparatus according to claim 4, wherein the filters are arranged with the reddish brown component nearest the eyes of a pilot for affording easy visibility of the cockpit instruments and for the better retention of night-vision in respect of external lights.

6. In apparatus for practicing night-landing of aircraft in daylight and comprising at least one lamp in the landing area for emitting at least one beam of light which is especially strong around particular wavelengths and light filter means to be employed on an aircraft to control the wavelengths of light reaching the pilot's eyes from the exterior and from the interior of the aircraft, respectively; a compound light absorp: tion filter comprising two filter sections with different transmission bands of the spectrum which have in common only substantially said particular wavelengths, means for supporting one filter section in the line of a pilot's vision of the landing area, and means for supporting the other filter section in the path of light reaching the eyes of the pilot both from the interior of the aircraft and through the first filter section, thereby to restrict exterior daylight vision of an aircraft pilot to a negligible amount while allowing adequate extenior visibility of said lamp and interior visibility of brilliantly illuminated instruments for his guidance in accurate flying.

'7. In apparatus for practicing night landing of aircraft in daylight, the invention according to claim 6, wherein at least one filter section is embodied in an eye covering worn by the pilot such as to exclude the admission of any unfiltered daylight.

8. The invention according to claim 6, wherein at least part of said compound filter is worn by the pilot and comprises superposed layers of different transmissions, and means supporting one filter layer for displacement into inoperative position temporarily at the will of the pilot.

9. Apparatus according to claim 6, wherein the compound light absorption filter is associated with at least some of the light entrances of an aircraft structure within the vision of the pilot.

10. Apparatus according to claim 6, wherein the compound light absorption filter is associated with an inner screen within at least some of the light entrances of an aircraft structure within the vision of the pilot.

11. In apparatus for practicing night-landing of aircraft in daylight and including at least one monochromatic lamp in the landing area and filter means to be employed in an aircraft; a cornpound light absorption filter comprising filters with different abruptly cut-oil. transmission bands of the spectrum and having a common transmission overlap only at and near the effective wavelengths of said monochromatic lamp, said filters being mechanically separate for spacing to position both in series in an aircraft pilot's view of the landing area and to only one between the pilot and the cockpit instruments of the aircraft, thereby to restrict exterior daylight vision of an aircraft pilot to a negligible amount while allowing adequate exterior visibility of said monochromatic lamp and interior visibility of cockpit instruments when brilliantly illuminated by lighting which has a sufficiency of light around those wavelengths the most freely transmitted by the said compound filter.

12. In apparatus for practicing night-landing of aircraft in daylight and including at least one monochromatic lamp in the landing area; the combination of eparated light absorption filters associated respectively with an aircraft and a pilot therein, said filters having different abruptly cut-off trans-mission bands of the spectrum and having also a common transmission overlap only at and near the effective wavelengths of said monochromatic lamp, whereby aid filters may be positioned in spaced relation to restrict exterior daylight vision of an aircraft pilot to a negligible amount while allowing adequate exterior visibility of said lamp and interior visibiltiy of illuminated instruments for his guidance in accurate flying.

13. In apparatus for practicing night-landing of aircraft in daylight and comprising at least one lamp in the landing area for emitting a strong light of wavelength between 5,800 A. U. and 6,000 A. U. regardless of other wavelength emissions; two light absorption filters which are used substantially in a complementary sense, said filters being formed to transmit only light of a wavelength approximately 5,600 A. U. to 6,000 A. U. in the one instance and approximately 5,800 A. U. to 6,200 A. U. in the other instance with maximum transmission in each case at or about 5,890 A. U.. whereby the location of only one filter between the pilot and instruments in the aircraft cockpit and of both filters between the pilot and the landing area serves to restrict daylight vision of a pilot in an aircraft while allowing adequate visibility of said lamp on the landing area and of suitable illuminated instruments in the aircraft cockpit.

14. In apparatus for practicing night-landing in daylight with a lamp at the landing area emitting a beam which is especially strong in the wavelength band of from 5,800 to 6,000 A. U., and for use with a complementary filter to provide an overall transmission restricted substantially to said band of wavelengths, a light absorbing filter having a band pass transmission including said band of from 5,800 to 6,000 A. U. and a sharp cut-oil at and adjacent one side of said band of wavelengths.

15. The invention as recited in claim 14, wherein said light absorbing filter includes two elements of different wavelength transmission characteristics.

16. The invention as recited in claim 14, wherein said filter comprises goggles to be worn by a pilot and having a band pass which includes and extends above said band of wavelengths.

17. The invention as recited in claim 14, wherein said filter comprises a sheet of light absorbing material to be mounted in the cockpit of an aircraft, said sheet having a band pass transmission including and extending below said band of wavelengths.

CHARLES HAROLD WOOD.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,280,358 Tietig Apr. 21, 1942 2,403,195 Ross July 2, 1946 OTHER REFERENCES Aero Digest, page 295, July 1943.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2280358 *Aug 9, 1939Apr 21, 1942Tietig ChesterWindow shade or the like
US2403195 *Jan 10, 1944Jul 2, 1946Ross Jr De Witt TCockpit shield
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2722059 *Aug 14, 1950Nov 1, 1955Link Aviation IncDouble layer hood and simulated lightning and variable outside light intensity effects for grounded aviation trainer
US2930142 *Aug 12, 1953Mar 29, 1960Sol DomeshekStereoscopic range estimating training device
US3001300 *Aug 30, 1960Sep 26, 1961Green Robert GApparatus for simulating the instrument flying conditions in operational aircraft
US3281965 *Aug 2, 1965Nov 1, 1966Kirk S IrwinControlled visibility device for an aircraft
US3614314 *Mar 21, 1967Oct 19, 1971Bendix CorpOptical display means for an all-weather landing system of an aircraft
US4698022 *Jun 11, 1981Oct 6, 1987Foggles, Inc.Visual occulsion apparatus for pilot training
US5252069 *Mar 30, 1992Oct 12, 1993Richard A. LambInstrument flight rules (IFR) training device
US5372504 *Jul 25, 1991Dec 13, 1994Buechler; Richard L.Apparatus for pilot training
US8337206 *Mar 15, 2007Dec 25, 2012Airbus Operations SasTool for assisting in the design of an aircraft flight deck compatible with a night vision system
Classifications
U.S. Classification434/36, 359/889, 359/890, 244/121
International ClassificationG09B9/16, G09B9/02
Cooperative ClassificationG09B9/165
European ClassificationG09B9/16B