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Publication numberUS2511084 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1950
Filing dateNov 7, 1947
Priority dateNov 7, 1947
Publication numberUS 2511084 A, US 2511084A, US-A-2511084, US2511084 A, US2511084A
InventorsJoe C Shaw
Original AssigneeYoung Radiator Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Heat-exchanger core
US 2511084 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 13, 1950 J. c. SHAW 2,511,084

HEAT EXCHANGER CORE Filed Nov. 7, 194:? 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 June 13, 1950 J. c. SHAW 2,511,084

HEAT EXCHANGER CORE Filed NOV. 7, 1947 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 June 13, 1950 J. c. SHAW 2,511,084

" HEAT EXCHANGER com:

Filed Nov. 7, 1947 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Patented June 13, 1950 HEAT-EXCHANGER CORE Joe 0. Shaw, Racine, Wia, assignor to Young Radiator Company, Racine, Wis., a corporation of Wisconsin Application November 7, 1947, erial No. 784,605

10 Claims.

The main objects oi this invention are, to provide an improved heat-exchanger core for use in the cooling of fluids particularly the oil required for lubricating heat-generating, power-producing units; to provide improved construction of the individual core units, a, plurality of which are assemblable to form an improved heat-exchanger core of the required size and capacity; to provide improved complementarily-iormed upper and lower plates and an intermediate baflle assemblable into a core unit of which several are required to make a core; to provide an improved form of fluid inlet and outlet conduits for an assembly of heat-exchange cores of this kind whereby the oil may be caused to flow through the several coreunits in parallel, in series, or in a parallel-series combination, as may be desired; to provide an improved heat-exchanger core of this kind whereby the plates and baiiie which form each core unit may be stemped from thin sheet metal; and to provide an improved heat-exchanger core of this kind the several parts of which are extremely simple to manufacture, very facile to assemble, and when assembled highly efficient in operation.

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view partly broken away of an improved heat-exchanger core embodying this invention;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged transverse detail, partly sectional and partly elevational, of an embodiment of the improved core arranged for a parallel flow through the several units, the view being taken on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Figs. 3 and 4 are plan views respectively of the bottom and top plates which assembled form an individual core unit, a plurality of which are assemblable to constitute an improved core embodying this invention;

Figs. 5 and 6 are cross-sectional details of such bottom and top plates, taken on the lines 5-5 and 6 of Figs. 3 and 4 respectively; 4

Fig. 7 is a plan view of the bottom support plate for an assembly of core units;

Fig. 8 is a cross-sectional detail 01 such a bottom support plate, taken on the line 8-8 of i 7;

Fig. 9 is plan view of the baffle plate one of which is used between each pair of assembled bottom and top plates shown in the above-mentioned figures;

Fig. 10 is a cross-sectional detail of such a beille. taken on the line Iii-l8 of Fig. 9;

Fig. 11 is a detail of one of the conduits by means of which the oil is admitted to or discharged irom the several core units;

Fig. 12 is an enlarged cross-sectional detail of a core embodying a modified construction and arrangement of the inlet and outlet conduits whereby the oil flow through the several units is z y in series rather than in paralleL'as is the case with the embodiment shown in Fig. 2; and

Fig. 13 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of a core embodying a still further modified construction and arrangement 01 the inlet and outlet conduits so as to provide a series-parallel combination oil flow through the several unitswhich make up a core.

An improved heat-exchange core embodying this invention comprises, a mounting 15 on which a core 16 formed of a plurality of core units I1 is mounted and to and from which the fluid flows through inlet and outlet conduits l8 and IS.

The mounting I5 is preferably in the form of a plate. By means of bolts 20 a predetermined number of core units I! are secured to the plate or mounting I5 in parallel relationship. Other bolts 2| are anchored to the plate by means of which the core is may be appropriately secured to the supporting frame or a part of the power unit with which this improved heat-exchanger core is to be used. The mounting or plate I! is provided with appropriate bores 22 and 23, as indicated in Fig. 1, wherein are seated the upper ends of the conduits l8 and I9. Also a series of apertures 24 are formed around the periphery of the mounting l5 to permit the attachment of a housing (shown in dotted outline) for enclosing the core i6 where it is desired to channel the flow of a coolant such as water around the core units I! rather than leaving them exposed for the flow 01 air as a coolant.

As is clearly indicated, this improved core I8 is made up of a plurality of core units [1, held in spaced parallel relationship on the mounting H: by means of the bolts 20 in cooperation with upper and lower support plates 25 and 26. Proper spacing of the units 11 is, obtained by means of bushings 21 embracing the bolts 20 intermediate the respective units H. The bolts 20 are herein shown to have their ends upset to form conical heads 28 seated in conical sockets formed in the mounting l5 and in the bottom support plate 28. Obviously, other forms of heads 28 could be provided for this purpose.

A core unit l1 comprises lower and upper plates 29 and 30 and an intermediate baiile 3|. Each of the plates 23 and 30 is formed with peripheral flanges 32, ports 33 and 34 bounded by transversely outwardly-disposed flanges 35 and 3B, and a plurality of embossments 31', certain 01' the embossments being apertured, as indicated at 38, to receive the bolts 20. Thus these two plates are identical in construction with the exception that the top plate 30 is made sufilciently smaller in width and length to permit the peripheral flange 32 thereon to telescope with the flange 32 on the bottom plate 29 when the plates are assembled. When thus assembled the ports 33 and 34 and the embossments 31 of the respective plates are located in opposed registering alinement, the embossments serving to cooperate in supporting the bailie 3| intermediate the plates- 29 and 39. Also, it should be noted that the plates 29 and 30 differ slightlyin the size oi! the port flanges 35 and 35 on the two plates. On lower plate 29 these port flanges 35 and 33 have their inside diameter equal to the outside diameter of the port flanges 35 and 36 on the upper plate 30. This permits the port flanges 35 and 36 on the lower and upper plates of adjacent core units I! to telescope with each other when two or more of the core units ll are assembled to form a core l5.

The baiile 3i, for use in the preferred embodiment, is provided with a pair of ports 39 and 40, the bordering portion 01' the material being upset to provide oppositely-disposed embossments 4| and 42. These embossments not only co-act with the plate embossments 31 in supporting the baille substantially equidistant between the plates 29 and 30 but also direct the fluid flow from and to the inlet and outlet conduits l8 and i9, as will appear more fully hereinaiter.

The baflie 3i is also provided with apertures 43 adapted to receive the bolts 20 and also may be provided with small bleed holes 44. Preterably, these bleed holes would be located in the area intermediate and adjacent the ports 39 and 40. These bleed holes provide communication between the spaces of the core unit II on opposite sides of the baille 3i (see Fig. 13), to Iacilitate the thawing out of the space directly above that to which the fluid is previously introduced, as will appear more fully hereinafter.

The several core units I! which make up a core iii, of the desired size and capacity, are all identical with the exception of the lowermost core unit II. This lower unit has its bottom plate 29 modified only to the extent that the flanged ports 33 and 34 are omitted. There are thus provided sections 45 which constitute caps or closures for the ends of the inlet and outlet conduits l8 and IS.

The conduits I 8 and I9, in the preferred embodiment of this invention, shown in Fig. 2, are of identical construction. Each is in the form of a tube having peripheral slots 46 formed therein, the slots being so spaced axially oi the tubes that when a plurality of the core units I! are assembled on the mountin l5, with the conduits l8 and I9 in place, the slots 46 register or communicate with the spaces below and above the battle 3i as controlled by the depressions 4| and 42 respectively.

In the modification shown in Fig. 12 the inlet conduit l8 omits the peripheral slots 46 and extends through the series of core units [1 to communicate with the lowermost unit, below the baflle 3|. In this modification the outlet conduit I9 is of a length sufilcient only to communicate with the uppermost core unit I! above the baiile 3|. It will be noted that in this modification the bailie 3i is without the ports 39 and 40 and the depressions 4| and 42. In this form the flow through the core units i1 is in series.

In the modification shown in Fig. 13 the conduits l8 and ii! are slotted as shown in Figs. 2 and 11. However, the inlet conduit i8 is provided with transverse partitions 41 and 48, which divide the conduit into upper, lower, and intermediate sections 49, 50, and Si. A tube 52, of less diameter than the inlet i8, extends through and is supported on the partitions 41 and 43 and provides communication between the conduit sections 43 and 55. Likewise the outlet conduit |9 is provided with a partition 53 which divides that conduit into lower and upper sections 54 and 55. Such an arrangement provides for a parallel-series flow through the core units.

The upper support plate 25 is of a dimension sufiicient to extend beyond the inlet and outlet ports I8 and is. Like the lower plate 29 of a core unit I! this plate 25 is formed with ports 53 and 51 bordered by transverse outwardlydisposed flanges 53 and 53.

The bottom support plate 23 is formed with unported embossments 53 and 3| to nest with the sections 45 of the bottom plate 23 of the lowermost core unit H. The plate 25 is also provided with apertured embossments 62 to receive the heads 23 of the rods 20.

The assembly of a core i8 probably can be best effected in the following manner:

The mounting plate IS with the studs 2i in place is mounted on a suitable jig or fixture, the studs 2i extending downwardly therefrom. l'he rivets or bolts 20 are placed in position and secured against displacement by the jig or fixture.

' whereupon the first set of spacers or bushings 21 may be placed on the bolts 20. The upper support plate 25 is next placed in position with the ports 56 and 51 in registration with the ports 22 and 23 in the mounting plate i5. Next a top plate 30 is placed over the rivets or bolts 20 and pushed down against the upper support plate 25 with the flanges 35 and 39 telescoping with the flanges 53 and 59 of the upper support plate 25. Next a baille 3i is placed in position on the upper plate 30 following which a bottom plate 29 is placed on the bolts or rivets 20 and pressed into position with the upper plate 29 with the respective flanges 32 telescoping, as clearly shown in Figs. 2 and 13. Another set of bushings or spacers 21 are placed on the bolts or rivets 23 and another core unit I! assembled as above described, the flanges 35 and 36 on the upper plate always telescoping with the flanges 35 and 35 on the previously assembled lower plate. This process is continued until the desired number of core units I! have been assembled, whereupon the lower support plate 25 is placed in position on the last assembled core unit ll, after which heads would be suitably formed on the bolts or rivets 23.

Such operation having been finished, the assembly would be removed from the jig or flxture and inlet and outlet tubes i8 and is would be pressed into place through the registering ports 33 and 34 in the several core units H, the upper ends of the conduits being flared so as to properly secure them to the mounting plate l5.

Subsequently, the assembly would be passed through a suitable hydrogen brazing furnace.

The operation of a heat-exchanger core embodying this invention is substantially as follows:

In any of the modifications herein shown oil is admitted through the inlet conduit i3. In the modification shown in Fig. 2 the entering oil would flow into each of the units I! through the peripheral slots 49 into communication with that part of each core unit II which is below the baille 3i. The flow would extend through the entire unit on the lower side of the baiile and then pass over the outer edges of the baflle and return to the outlet tube i9 on the other side. 1

The embossments 31 would cause a considerable degree of turbulence in the flow so that good heat transfer characteristics will be attained.

Moreover, th iluid flow passages being comparatively'thin a high velocity of flow would be ob-' tained, which of course is desirable for eflective heat transfer. In the modification shown in Fig. 12 the fluid entering the inlet conduit I8 would pass to the lowermost core unit I! below the baille 3 I, flowing to the edges of the same and up through the port 34 to the adjacent unit whereupon the flow would continue until it had finally reached the outlet port [9. i

In the modification shown in Fig. 13 the fluid flow would pass through the tube 52 to the conduit section 49 whence it would enter the registering core units, the same as in the case with the modification shown in Fig. 2. From the units communicating with the chamber 49 of the inlet I conduit iii the oil would flow into and through the section 54 of the outlet conduit lainto the core units i! above those in communication with the chamber 49 of the inlet conduit l8. From there the oil would flowinto the chamber 5| of the inlet conduit IB, from whence it would flow through the upper core units i1 into the chamber 55 of the outlet conduit I9. Such a path of oil flow is clearly shown by the arrows in said figure.

It will also be noted, as indicated by the arrows in Fig. 13, that the oil entering the lower portion of the core units, in communication with the chamber 41 of the inlet conduit i8, will have a tendency to pass through the bleed holes 44 in the baffle 3| into that part of the core directly above the baffle. This will facilitate the warm-up and accelerate the flow of the fluid in the upper portions of these units.

Other variations and modifications in the details of structure and arrangement of the parts may be resorted to within the spirit and coverage of the appended claims.

I claim:

1. In a heat-exchanger core of the class described the combination of a mounting, a plurality of separately-formed identical core units supported in spaced parallel arrangement on said mounting, each of said core units comprising a pair of plates, each of which has a pair of ports formed therein, secured together in spaced relationship and sealed around their perimeters to provide a fluid-flow space between said plates. a

ported baffle interposed between said plates parallel thereto and with its entire perimeter disposed inwardly of the sealed perimeter of said plates and with the baffle ports in registration With said plate ports, coacting means on said plates and bafile for supporting said baffle in said interposed parallel position and inlet and outlet conduits extending through said core unit ports and having peripheral openings formed therein communicating with the space between a baflle and one of said plates, the opening for one of said conduits communicating with the space on the opposite side of the baflle for one of said core units from thatwherewith the opening in the other said conduit communicates whereby the fluid entering said unit through said one conduit opening must pass around the perimeter of said baille to the space on the opposite side thereof before the fluid can flow toward and out through said other conduit opening.

2. In a heat-exchanger core of the class described the combination of a mounting, a plurality of separately-formed identical core units supported in spaced parallel arrangement on said mounting, each of said core units comprising a pair of plates, each of which has a pair of ports formed therein, secured together in spaced relationship and sealed around their perimeters to provide a fluid-flow space between said plates, a ported baffle interposed between said plates parallel thereto and with its entire perimeter disposed inwardly of the sealed perimeter of said plates and with the baille ports in registration with said plate ports, co-acting means on each 01' said baille co-acting with said plates for disposing each batlle substantiallyequidistant between said respective pair of plates throughout the entire area oi. said baflle, and inlet and outlet conduits extending through said core unit ports and having peripheral openings formed therein communicating with the space between said baiile and said plates, the opening for one of said conduits communicating with the space on the opposite side of the baiile for one of said core units from that wherewith the opening in the other said conduit communicates whereby the fluid entering said unit through said one conduit opening must pass around the perimeter of said baille to the space on the opposite side thereof before the fluid can flow toward and out through said other conduit opening.

3. In a heat-exchanger core of the class described the combination of. a mounting, a plurality of separately-formed identical core units supported in spaced parallel arrangement on said mounting, each of said core units comprising a pair of plates, each of which has a pair of ports formed therein, secured together in spaced relationship and sealed around their perimeters to provide a fluid-flow space between said plates, a ported baiile interposed between said plates parallel thereto and with its perimeter disposed inwardly of the sealed perimeter of said plates, said baflle having the portions thereof peripheral to said ports embossed, the embossment for one port being in the opposite direction from that for the other said port whereby said baille is supported substantially equidistant between said plates, and inlet and outlet conduits extending through said core unit ports and having peripheral openings formed therein communicating with the space between said baiile and said plates, the openings for one of said conduits communicating with the space on the opposite side of said baffle from that wherewith the opening in the other said conduit communicates.

4. In a heat-exchanger core of the class described thecombination of a mounting, a plurality of separately-formed identical core units supported in spaced parallel arrangement on said mounting, each of said core units comprising a pair of plates, each of which has a pair of ports formed therein and is formed with a plurality of inwardly-extending embossments, secured together in spaced relationship with said embossments opposed and coacting to space said plates apart and sealed around their perimeters to provide a fluid-flow space between said plates, a ported baiile interposed between each of said pair of plates parallel thereto and in contact with said embossments whereby each of said bafiles is supported equidistant throughout its entire area from the respective pairs of plates and with its entire perimeter disposed inwardly of the sealed perimeter of said respective pair of plates, and inlet and outlet conduits extending through said core unit ports and having peripheral openings formed therein communicating with the space between said baiile and said plates, the opening for one of said conduits communicating with the space on the opposite side of the battle for one of said core units from that wherewith the opening in the other said conduit communicates whereby the fluid entering said unit through said one conduit opening must pass around the perimeter of said bailie to the space on the opposite side thereof before the fluid can flow toward and out through said other conduit opening.

5. In a heat-exchanger core of the class described the combination of a mounting, a plurality oi separately-formed identical core units supported in spaced parallel arrangement on said mounting, each of said core units comprising a pair of perimetrically-fianged plates assembled in opposed relationship with said flanges telescoping with each other and providing a sea] for the space between said plates, each of said plates having a plurality of inwardly-extending embossments and a pair of ports formed therein and'so positioned that said embossments and ports fpr one plate register with those of the other when said plates are assembled, said registering embossments co-acting with the hereinafter-mentioned baille to hold said plates in proper spaced relationship, a baiiie arranged between each pair of said plates parallel thereto and supported by said embossments equidistant between said plates with the entire baiile perimeter disposed inwardly of the peripheral flanges of said plates and having ports in said bailles registering with the ports in said plates, and inlet and outlet conduits extending through the registering ports in said core units and having peripheral openings formed in said conduits communicating with the space between said bailie and said plates, the opening for one of said conduits communicating with the space on the opposite side of said baille for one of said core units from that wherewith the opening in the other said conduit communicates whereby the fluid entering said unit through said one conduit opening must pass around the perimeter of said baiile to the space on the opposite side thereof before the fluid can flow toward and out through said other conduit opening.

6. In a heat-exchanger core of the class described the combination of a mounting, a plurality of separately-formed identical core units supported in spaced parallel arrangement on said mounting, each of said core units comprising a pair of perimetrically-flanged plates assembled in opposed relationship with said flanges telescoping with each other and providing a seal for the space between said plates, each of said plates having a plurality of inwardly-extending embossments and a pair of ports formed therein and so positioned that said embossments and ports for one plate register with those of the other when said plates are assembled, said registering embossments co-acting with the hereinaftermentioned bai'lle to hold said plates in proper spaced relationship, a bailie interposed between said plates, said baille having ports formed therein with the portions peripheral to said ports embossed, the embossment for one port being in the opposite direction from that for the other said port whereby in cooperation with said plate embossments said baflle is supported substantially equidistant between said plates with the ports therein registering with said plate ports, and inlet and outlet conduits extending through the registering ports in said core units and having peripheral openings formed therein communicating with the space between said battle and said plates, the opening for one of said conduits communicating with the space on the opposite side of said bailie from that wherewith the opening in the other said conduit communicates.

7. In a heat-exchanger core of the classdescribed the combination of a mounting, a plurality of separately-formed identical core units supported in spaced parallel arrangement on said mounting, each of said core units comprising a pair or perimetrically-flanged plates assembled in opposed relationship with said flanges telescoping with each other and providing a seal for the space between said plates, each of said plates having a plurality of inwardly-extending embossments and a pair of ports formed therein and so positioned that said "embossments and ports for one plate register with those of the other when said plates are assembled, said registering embossments co-acting with the hereinafter-mentioned baffle to hold said plates in proper spaced relationship, a baille interposed between said plates, said baiile having ports formed therein with the portions peripheral to said ports embossed, the embossment for one port being in the. opposite direction from that for the other said port whereby in cooperation with said plate embossments said baffle is supported substantially equidistant between said plates with the ports therein registering with said plate ports,,said baffle having one or more small apertures formed therein in the area substantially intermediate said ports to provide a limited communication between the core unit spaces on opposite sides of said bailie, and inlet and outlet conduits extending through the registering ports in said core units and having peripheral openings formed therein communicating with the space between said bafiie and said plates, the

openings for one of said conduits communicating with the space on the opposite side of said bafile from that wherewith the opening in the other said conduit communicates.

8. In a heat-exchanger core oi the class described the combination of a mounting, a plurality of separately-formed identical core units supported in spaced parallel arrangement on said mounting, each oi. said core units comprising a pair of perimetrically-flanged plates assembled in Opposed relationship with said flanges telescoping with each other and providing a seal for the space between said plates, each of said plates having a pair of ports bounded by outwardlydisposed transverse flanges, the interior diameter of said port flanges on one of said plates being equal to the exterior diameter of the port flanges on the other said plate whereby said port flanges on adjacent core units telescope and provide a seal around the respective ports between said units when said core units are assembled in said parallel relationship, a baflle interposed between each pair of plates, means for supporting said baffles intermediate said plates equidistant therefrom throughout the entire area of said baiiie end with the entire perimeter of the baille disposed inwardly of the sealed perimeter of said plates, and inlet and outlet conduits extending through said core unit ports and having peripheral opening formed therein communicating with the space between said bafile and said plates, the opening for one of said conduits communicating with the space on the opposite side of said baiile for one of said core units from that wherewith the opening in the other said conduit communicates whereby the fluid entering said unit through said one conduit opening must pass around the perimeter of said baflle to the space on the opposite side thereof before the fluid can flow toward and out through said other conduit opening.

9. In a heat-exchanger core of the class described the combination at a mounting, a plurality of separately-formed identical core units supported in spaced parallel arrangement on said mounting, each of said core units comprising a pair 01' perimetrically-flanged plates assembled in opposed relationship with said flanges telescoping with each other and providing a seal for the space between said plates, each of said plates having a pair of ports bounded by outwardlydisposed transverse flanges, the interior diameter of said port flanges on one of said plates being equal t the exterior diameter of the port flanges on the other said plate whereby said port flanges on adjacent core units telescope and provide a seal around the respective ports between said units when said core units are assembled in said parallel relationship, a battle interposed between each pair of plates, means for supporting each of said baiiles intermediate a pair of said plates equidistant therefrom throughout the entire area of said baifle and with the entire perimeter of the battle disposed inwardly of the sealed perimeter of said plates, an inlet conduit communicating with the lowermost core unit only below the respective baflie, and an outlet conduit communicating with the uppermost core unit only above the respective baiile whereby the fluid entering said inlet conduit is required to flow in succession through each oi said units on opposite sides and around the perimeter of the respective bai'iles.

10. A core unit for heat exchangers oi the class described comprising, a pair of perimetrically-flanged plates arranged in opposed relationship with said flanges oppositely disposed transverse to the respective plates and telescoping with each other and providing a seal for the space between said plates, each of said plates having a plurality of inwardly-extending embossments and a pair of ports each of the latter of which are bounded by an outwardly-disposed transverse flange so positioned that the embossments and flanged ports of said plates register with each other when said plates are assembled,

said embossments co-acting to hold said plates in proper spaced relationship, the interior diameter of the flanges on one of said plates being equal to the exterior diameter of the flanges on the other said plate whereby when two or more of said units are assembled in parallel relationship the port flanges on one unit telescope with the port flanges on the adjacent unit and provide a seal around the respective ports between said units, and a baflie having ported oppositelydisposed offsets interposed between said plates and engaged by said embossments with said ported ofisets in contact with the opposite plates for supporting said baiiie substantially equidistant throughout its entire area between said plates with its entire perimeter disposed inwardly oi the sealed perimeter of said plates and with the ports in said baiiles in registration with the ports in said plates and by said telescoping port flanges providing a seal around said ports between adjacent units. v

JOE C. SHAW.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 753,031 Aylsworth Feb. 23, 1904 1,690,501 Potts Nov. 6, 1928 2,222,721 Ramsaur et al Nov. 21, 1940 2,346,178 Mercier Apr. 11, 1944 2,354,865 Kucher et a1 Aug. 1, 1944 2,360,123 Gerstung et a1 Oct. 10, 1944 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 113,651 Great Britain Feb. 2'1, 1918 484,165 Great Britain Apr. 13, 193'? 215,204 Switzerland Sept. 1, 1941

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Classifications
U.S. Classification165/166, 165/157, 165/916
International ClassificationF28D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationY10S165/916, F28D9/0043
European ClassificationF28D9/00F4