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Publication numberUS2511561 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1950
Filing dateAug 31, 1946
Priority dateAug 31, 1946
Publication numberUS 2511561 A, US 2511561A, US-A-2511561, US2511561 A, US2511561A
InventorsBeumer Howard G
Original AssigneeBeumer Howard G
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pen point
US 2511561 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

H. G. BEUMER June 13, 1950 PEN POINT Filed Aug. 31, 1946 QTroRl/EKS.

Patented June 13, 1950 UNITED OFFICE PEN POINT .Howardid Beumer, SteLouis'iGounty, Mo.

Application August 31, 1946,'-seria1-Noi 694,225

.inkand which affords also theadvantages oi'fiow control characteristic of regular pens.

More particularly, it is an object of the invention to provide a ball point pen that is combined with'a'feeder of a split type, so that conven- Z=tional pressure. on thepenwvill'cause hezs'hield to :spread and" increase the flower to the-f-point.

ilAnother object of the invention" is to provide a ball point of this kind that may be used in regular writing position.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation char-pen embodying gth'is invention;

:Fig. 2 is a longitudinal section of thespoint of the pen taken on the line 2 2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a transverse section through the ball,

taken on the line 33 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is a bottom view of the ball mounted in the pen; and

Fig. 5 is a perspective View of the ball and the split shield.

The penis generally indicated at Ill and has a point section 6 5 connected to a barrel section 12 that contains the usual ink reservoir.

The tip section 5 l is made up of several parts.

There is a metal point I3 that interfits with a s suitable feed control i :3 attached to the end of the barrel section [2. A conventional feed passage I5 leads from the reservoir in the barrel to the interior of the point or nib l3. This feed control likewise contains conventional feeder capillaries The nib i3 is similar to conventional nibs, except that at its point end it has a section 28 that is formed in the shape of the portion of a sphere. The entire end, including the portion at, is slotted at Z I, so that the two halves of the section 26 may spread greater or lesser degrees apart in the same manner that the two halves of a conventional pen point now separate when pressure is applied to them.

The section it is adapted to receive a ball 23 and to hold the same for rotating movement.

An intermediate cover 24 that is more or less tubular has an inner passage that will receive the nib l3 and its spherical end 2%]. The member 24 is threaded at 25 to be supported upon the barrel l2. This member 24 likewise has a downwardly extending abutment portion 26 that is disposed slightly above the outer surface of the spherical portion 29 when the parts are located in place.

tip covei 2'8 is 'tlirbade(itas shown to the outer "and of the"inner coven fii. This tip cover'has-an "opening ifi on the u riderside of its outer ends, which opening has-lugs BB projecting outwardly therefrom around its periphery. These lugs e'x- "outwardly -to' poiiitsthat are closer together than che -maximumequatorial dimension or *the ball, so that,"when "the' tip' co'ver 28"is located in p'lace, the ball w ill "be held in the cup 29 but may rotate therbi'n. 'l he tip :cover 28 likewise su plemen ts the abutment 26 'on the inner-cavern "to fo'r'm a portion above the 'cup' 2Q; against which 'the '(3up -'-rna'y"-'be"-fleXd. "-This' abutment thereby determines the maic'imum 'fie'xure of "the cu'p member.

* Operation 1 iIn' conventional fashion, ink fflows from the reservoir ofthe barrel idown toithe nib, and there it enters the inner'surface ofilthe 'cup' 2B. :The

ball is freely rotatable in the cup, and thereby has its surface covered with ink which is tracked onto paper for writing purposes.

The feed of the ink may be increased by increasing the pressure applied to the pen. Such pressure causes the ball 23 to press against the two halves of the cup 20, which may be spread because of the presence of the slit 2|. Thus the flow of ink may be varied as it is in conventional pens, and yet the advantages of the ball point are secured.

It will be seen that the design of this point attains the advantages of both the ball point pen and the conventional pen. The ball point in this arrangement may be used with conventional ink, and the rate of flow may be determined by the pressure applied to the pen as is true of conventional pens. Likewise, this arrangement permits the ball to be oil the center of the end of the pen, so that writing at the conventional angle may be done. Furthermore, no radical change is design of the pen is required to embody this invention therein.

It will be understood that the feed parts of the present disclosure are shown merely for illustration, and that any of the conventional types of feed may be used. Many variations may be made in this invention, as will be understood.

What is claimed is:

1. A pen including a nib for use with free flowing ink, said nib having a receiver at its end to engage partially around a ball, a ball in said receiver said nib having a feed regulating slot extending to the ball, the receiver being constructed of yieldable material to change the opening of the slot in response to change in pressure on the ball.

2. A pen including a point for use with free flowing ink, a receiver on the end of the point shaped like a portion of a hollow sphere, said receiver being split so that it may separate in response to pressure, and a ball in said receiver adapted to receive ink from the receiver for writing purposes.

3. A pen point including a shank section and a hollow hemispherical shaped tip mounted thereon, the tip being concave downwardly, a slot extending across the tip dividing the same so that the two portions thereof may be separated and ink may flow between them.

4. A pen including a point for use with free flowing ink, a tip on the point in the form of a. hollow portion of a sphere, a ball engaged in said tip and adapted to be used for writing, the tip being split so that pressure applied to the ball will spread the sections thereof and increase the ink flow thereinto, means supporting the tip, and abutment means limiting the flexure of the portions of the tip by the pressure applied to the ball.

5. A pen having a writing end, a ball writing element, means supporting the ball writing element rotatably in the end, said means having an opening through which the ball projects to one side of the said writing end, said support means including a flexible ball engaging member, said member having an ink-conducting means thereon, and means responsive to variation in pressure on the ball to vary the amount of ink flowing from the conducting means to the ball.

6. A pen including a point for use with free flowing ink, a tip on the point in the form of a portion of a hollow sphere, and a ball rotatably mounted in said tip, the tip and a portion of the point adjacent thereto being split so as to form sections so that pressure applied to the ball will spread the sections apart and increase the flow of ink to the ball.

' '7. A pen including a point for use with free flowing ink, a tip on the point in the form of a portion of a hollow sphere, a ball rotatably mounted in said tip, the tip and a portion of the point adjacent thereto being split so as to form sections so that pressure applied to the ball will flex and spread the sections apart and increase the flow of ink to the ball, and abutment means limiting the amount of flexure of the sections.

8. A pen including a point member for use with free flowing ink, a ball rotatably mounted on the end of the point member, and means to conduct ink to the ball, said conducting means including an ink passage, and pressure-responsive means connected to the ball and responsive to variation in pressure exerted against the ball to vary the flow capacity of the passage so as to vary the amount of ink flowing to the ball.

HOWARD G. BEUMER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the flle of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 555,763 Fessenden Mar. 3, 1896 1,909,616 Hecking May 16, 1933 2,360,297 Wing Oct. 10, 1944 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 14,103 Great Britain 1895 491,059 Germany 1930 800,851 France 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US555763 *Nov 21, 1895Mar 3, 1896 Fountain marking-pen
US1909616 *Sep 15, 1927May 16, 1933Joseph F O BrienPen, pen-point, and process of making same
US2360297 *Apr 10, 1944Oct 10, 1944Wing Russell TFountain pen
DE491059C *Feb 8, 1930Wilhelm WinkelmannSchreibgeraet mit an der Austrittskegelmuendung der Fluessigkeit liegender, rollender Kugel
FR800851A * Title not available
GB189514103A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2629605 *May 18, 1949Feb 24, 1953Krisch KubePhonograph needle
US2699148 *Feb 20, 1951Jan 11, 1955DegussaBall pen point
US2896250 *Dec 1, 1954Jul 28, 1959Burnie J CraigApparatus for making ball point pens
US3192904 *Nov 9, 1961Jul 6, 1965Johmann Frank TWriting instrument
US3281933 *May 29, 1963Nov 1, 1966Irc LtdMethod for preparing a tilted nib
US4198172 *Apr 20, 1978Apr 15, 1980Tri-Chem de Puerto Rico, Inc.Angled ball tip for viscous fluids
US5588765 *Dec 16, 1994Dec 31, 1996Signa Scan, Inc.Apparatus for analyzing signatures
DE2710919A1 *Mar 12, 1977Sep 21, 1978Montblanc Simplo GmbhMit spalt versehene schreibfeder fuer fluessigtinten
Classifications
U.S. Classification401/214, 401/216
International ClassificationB43K1/08, B43K1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB43K1/08
European ClassificationB43K1/08