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Publication numberUS2512328 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 20, 1950
Filing dateJun 28, 1946
Priority dateJun 28, 1946
Publication numberUS 2512328 A, US 2512328A, US-A-2512328, US2512328 A, US2512328A
InventorsEugene Hays Noble
Original AssigneeArmco Steel Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Continuous electroplating device
US 2512328 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 20, 1950 N. E. HAYS CONTINUOUS ELECTROPLATING DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed June 28, 1946 l II INVENTOR. GENE H4 K5.

ATTORN 5Y5- Patented June 20, 1950 CONTINUOUS ELECTROPLATING DEVICE Noble Eugene Hays, Middletown, Ohio, assignor to Armco Steel ,Corpor Ohio ation, a corporation of Application June 28, 1946, Serial N 0. 680,192

My invention relates to apparatus for continuously electroplating metal sheet or strip, and has as its general objects the solution of those problems hitherto encountered in continuous plating. It is an object of my invention to provide an apparatus in which rapid plating at high current densities can be carried on, and in; which electrical contact is made with the strip by means of contact rolls which are neither in the electrolyte nor subject to deleterious association with the electrolyte, while at the same time being located close enough to the bath to minimize electrical losses due to. theresistance of the strip or sheets.

It is an objector my invention to provide an apparatus in which high velocity agitation can be provided at the surface of the metal being plated, to carry off the heat and gases enerated by the use of high current densities.

It is an object of my invention to providean apparatus which is both shorter in length; and more rapid in its action than means hitherto available. M

These and the more specific objects of myinvention which will be set forth hereinafter or will be apparent to one skilled in the art upon readin these specifications, I accomplish by that construction and arrangement of parts of which I shall now describe exemplary embodiments. Reference is made to the accompanying drawings wherein:

Figure 1 is a plan view of one form of my apparatus.

Figure 2 is a side elevational view thereof. 7

Figure 3 is a longitudinal sectional view,-taken along the line 3G-3' of Figure 4;

Figure 4 is a transverse sectional viewtaken on line 4'4' of Figure 3.

The apparatus herein disclosed provides for electroplating sheet or.strip metal continuously in a straight horizontal plane and without deviation from that plane so far as my apparatus is concerned. This makes it possible to electroplate so-called dead-soft (i. e... untemperedl flat rolled steel. In spite'o'f the horizontal path of travel of the sheet or strip'metal, I am able to provide a high Velocity flow'of the plating solution. This in turn permits me to use extremely high current densities, greatly shortening. the length of the apparatusas well as the time 'for producing a. coating of any given weight. l

In the practice of my invention, I provide a plating tank and passv the metal to be plated through it, there being slots in the end walls of 11 Claims. (01. zoo-eon I duced into the tank through perforations inbne the tank for the purpose. Electrolyte i intro {so or both side walls at the level of the path of the metal to be plated, and leaves the plating tank through the aforesaid slots, both above and below the metal. Electrolyte is introduced in sumcient volume to maintain an electrolyte level well above the path 'of the metal in spite of the. cute flow; and since the slots-permit an outflow of large volume, the result is a very intense circulation of electrolyte, localized 'to a large extent at the surfaces of the metal being plated.

Engaging the metal sheets or strip outside the plating tank and beyond the slots, I provide pairs of wiping rolls which act not only to direct the flow of electrolyte, but on the exit side to remove the electrolyte from the surface of the metal. Beyond the wiping rolls I provide contact rolls, which thus are protected from the electrolyte a both ends of the plating tank.

Means located beneath the wiping rolls are provided to catchthe escaping electrolyte. These may be pans or troughs united with the plating tank and connected with reservoir and 'circulatory means located elsewhere. But it is more convenient to provide a reservoir tank of larger dlmensionsthan the plating tank and so located that the plating tank lies above or partly above and partly within it. The circulatory means may then be located adjacent the reservoir tank and the whole apparatus will occupy very little space. Referring to the drawing I have shown a strip of metal I passing through my appartus horizontally in the direction of the arrows. In my preferred embodiment there is a main or reservoirtank 2 resting upon a suitable base or floor and being vof such height that the strip I in its horizontal travel passes entirely above the top edges of 'the end walls of the tank. Within 01: above the reservoir tank I provide a supplemen; tary or, plating tank 3, the relation of the two tanks being such that the tops of the walls of the plating tank extend substantially above the tops of the walls of the reservoir tank. The reservoir tank may be of lead, coated steel as shown; and it may be provided with a ledge 4 lo-' cated nearthe upper edgesof its walls. Suitable supports} for the plating tank are provided; and the plating tank maybe of wood or other con-' struction. v

The plating tank 3 is wider than the strip or sheets to be passed through it. l It has side walls which are imperforate, excepting for the electrolyte flow means hereinafter described. Its end Walls are, however, slotted as at 6 and I (Figl 3) to perm-it the passage of the strip or sheets through the plating tank. The electrolyte is kept at a level within the plating tank substantially higher than the level of the slots, 6 and 1', so

as to contact the upper anodes and to surround and cover the strip or sheets during their passage through the plating tank. The electrolyte flows out of the plating tank through the slots which are substantially wider than the thickness of the strip and substantially longer than the width of the strip; and the maintenance of the electrolyte level within the plating tank requires a continuous, rapid delivery of" electrolyte thereto.

I provide circulating means'ior' the electrolyte which in the illustrated embodiment comprises a pump 8 driven by a motor 9 (Figure 1). The pump has an inlet connection-l0, which may be valved as at H, with the lower part of the res- It also has an outlet conduit l2,

ervoir tank 2. which may be valved. as at l3, and which makes connection with a weir or now box l4 attached to the plating tank 3 and extending horizontally along the side wall of the tank. The weir is closed at its ends. It will be noted in'Figure 4 that there are connections in the form of perforations f5 between the weir and the interior of the plating tank, and that these connections are located at the'level of the sheet or strip 1 passing through the tank. Thus both sides of the sheet or strip l are bathed with high velocity electro-' lyte during this passage. As a precaution, and to avoid the necessity: of too close a control of the pump or valves, I may provide an overflow connection (not shown) between the plating tank 3 at the desired maximum electrolyte level, and thereservoir tank 2'. Weirs and inlet connections may, if desired, be located along both side walls of the plating tank. It is'to be understood that one of the fundamental features oi this arrangement is that the electrolyte is introduced into the tank right at the level of the sheet or stripwhich is passed through the tank. And although I have described thisparticular' arrangement as comprising a Weir 14 provided with per forations (5,,it is to be further understood that such arrangementmay comprise any suitable longitudinal conduit having transverse openings incommunioation with the interior of the. plat ing tank 3, said transverse openings being sub- 'stantially at the level of the sheet or strip and directed towards the edge of such strip as it is passed through the tank. V

As indicated above, the electrolyte leaves the plating tank 3. through the slots 6 and l and flows-back into the reservoir tank. Close to these slots at either endof the plating tank,,I.provide wiping rolls in thenature of pinch roll combinations I6, I] and [8,191 Thesepinch roll combinations overlie the reservoir tank 2 as shown; and they have a 'triplefunction. They wipe e1ec-' trolyte from the surfaces of the strips or sheets, notalone to prevent the carrying out of e'l'ectrolyte', but also to protect the contact 'rolls hereinafter described;.and they catch and break up thestreams of electro'lyte flowing from the slots G'and l and deliverthe electrolyte quietlyto the reservoirtank 2. They may also be used to re strict the outflow of electrolyte somewhat so that the liquid level within the plating tank is more easilymaintained. e v

The wiping rolls, while outside the plating tank, are located above the reservoir tank or other means to catch the escaping electrolyte. Asa further means' of electrolyte control I prefer to groove or reduce the ends of the pinch reservoir tank 2.

4 rolls as at and provide dams 2| connecting the rolls with the plating tank. These dams will be spaced further from each other than the greatest width of sheet or strip to be plated.

Contact rolls in the form of pinch roll combinations are provided as at 22, 23 and 26, 25. Because of the action of the wiping rolls, the contact roll combinations may be brought up very'close to the wiping rolls, and may be located with the wiping rolls over the ends of the The wiping rolls not only re move the electrolyte from the surfaces of the strip or sheets, but prevent splashing and splattering so as to protect the contact rolls from the electrolyte. Hence, diificulty is not encountered through any tendency of the electrolyte metal to plate out on the contact rolls.

I provide standards 26, 27, 28 and 29 in which I journal the shafts for the several lower rolls 25, I9, I1 and 23 of both the wiping roll and contact roll combinations. These standards are conveniently mounted upon the ledge lof the reserv'oir tank, but may be mounted elsewhere. It is desired to drive the rolls, and for this purpose I mount sprockets on their ends; interconnecting the sprockets of the lower rolls at each end of the tank by chains 3!! and 3h Additional sprockets may be provided and a chain connection 32 made between the rolls at both ends of the tank (see Figures 1 and 2'). The rolls will be connected to a suitable source of power (not shown).

The upper rolls 24', l8, l6 and 22 preferably have their shafts journalled in blocks slidablc in the standards and adjustably spring controlled as shown, so that the pressure between rolls acting as pinch roll combinations may be varied as desired. The wiping roll combinations may be made adjustable toward and away from the plat ing tank. The wping rolls are preferably metal rolls covered with soft rubber, although they may be made of other'materials. The contact rolls 24 and '22 are preferably of copper or of steel covered with copper. The lower rolls 25 and 23 may be ofs'imilar construction; but I prefer to make them with soft rubber coverings like the wiping rolls. These coverings absorb the shocks when the'rolls come together under pressure off the ends of strips and sheets, preventing marring of the metallic surfaces of rolls 24 and 22. These lastmentioned rolls'are provided with suitable connections to a source of electric current for plating, as diagrammatically indicated at 33 and 34 in Figures 1 and 3.

An upper set of anodes 35 and a lower set of anodes 35 are indicated in Figures 3 and 4;. Various anode shapes and arrangements are possible. I prefer to make'the anodes in the form of elongated bodies extending generally longitudinally of the plating tank. The upper anodes 35 have cars at their ends by means of which they rest upon rails 31 and 38 extending transverse the tank and serving to conduct current to the anodes. These rails are in turn supported at their ends by conductive straps 39 or 40 extending upwardly to longitudinal bars 41. These bars are supported by members 42 and 43 on beams 44 and 45 which extendtransverse the plating tank and beyond the sidewalls thereof, where they are joined at each end by beams 48. Beyond the side walls of the reservoir tank I have shown standards 4'! and 48 having ledges 49 and 5!]. The beams 46 are supported from these ledges by means where-- by their height (and hence the height of the upper set of anodes 35) may be adjusted. These means may conveniently be in the form of jacks 5| and 52. Electrical connection may be made to the several straps 39 and 50 as diagrammatically indicated at 53 in Figure 3.

In a similar fashion the lower anodes 35 have ears resting on rails 54 and 55 which at their ends are hung by straps 56 and 51 from longitudinal rails 58. These in turn are supported by members 59 and 61! on transverse beams 6i and 62 extending beyond the side walls of the reservoir tank where their ends are joined by beams 63. The beams 63 are adjustably supported on ledges E i and 65 of the standards 41 and 48 by means of jacks 66 and 67. Electrical connection may :be made to the straps 56 and 5'! as diagrammed at 98.

The upper and lower sets of anodes 35 and 36 each comprise a plurality of anodes in the form of elongated bodies supported at their ends as described. Between the individual anodes I preferably provide spacer members in corresponding upper and lower sets 69 and 10. The spacer members are made of some suitably strong insulative substance suitably resistant to the electrolyte. Laminated, molded panels of paper or cloth and synthetic resin such as phenolformaldehyde resin serve this purpose very well. The lower set of separators may rest in grooves in members H extending transversely of the plating tank, while their ends engage in grooves in members 12 at the ends of the tank.

The spacer members of the upper set 69 are spaced from each other by collars I3 on a series or transverse rods 14. To maintain alignment of the spacers I pass bars over them at intervals, and hold the upper edges of the spacers up against the under surfaces of these bars by means of eyebolts 16 engaging the rods 14 or collars 13. This prevents sagging, and permits the rods 14 to be used as suspending means. They may engage brackets 18 affixed to the side Walls of the plating tank, to which they may be held by collars or nuts 19.

Strip materials will usually be passed through the tank under tension sufiicient to keep them in a straight path. Sheets, however, present the problem of unengaged ends. In my apparatus, the spacer sets 69 and 10 extend somewhat beyond the surfaces of the anodes as shown, and serve not only to lead the forward ends of sheets or strip through the tank and between the anodes, but also to keep the strip or sheets out of electric contact with the anodes in spite of loose ends, and such sagging, buckling, camber and the like as may be encountered. They also enable me to bring my anodes closer to the surfaces of the metal to be plated than would be possible otherwise. The spacer members -69and Ill have their approaching edges far enough apart to provide for easy passage of the sheets or strips, and also (for properly controlled sheets or strip) to permit the flow of electrolyte over the surfaces in the manner hereinabove described. The spacing in practice may, for example, be of the order of 1 inches. Also, I prefer to form a series of small holes 80 near the adjacent edges of the spacers, to permit electrolyte flow even though a sheet or strip may be lying against the spacers. Above and below the anodes, the spacers may be provided with larger holes 8| for general circulation of the electrolyte.

It will be noted in Figure 1 that the anodes and spacers are arranged slightly aslant in the direction of motion of the sheet or strip to prevent streaking or inequalities'in the plated coating- 1 Guide members 82 and 83 maybe located between the pinch roll combinations.

In my apparatus I have combined great anode capacity per unit length with means effective to produce a rapid circulation of electrolyte at the surfaces of the work being plated, whereby heavy current densities may be employed, greatly shorteningthe length of the apparatus for continuous plating. -Means are provided to make electrical contact with the work, which means are located near the actual zone of plating and yet are protected from the electrolyte.

Additions may, of course, be made to my apparatus. In Figures 1 and 2, I have shown a washer or scrubber comprising spaced pinch roll combinations 84 and 85 (which may be coupled for driving and coupled to the pinch roll combinations of the plating apparatus as shown). Be-

tween these pinch roll combinations are shown scrubbing jet means 86 and 81, located above a pan 88.

When plating iron or steel sheets with zinc, by way of example, it may be desired to form a tooth on the plated zinc surface for the acceptance of paints or enamels. In this event the strip 1 may be led over a knee roll 89 into a tank 90 of the usual phosphating or Bonderizing solution.

In the claims which follow the term sheet metal is intended to cover both sheet and strip.

Modifications may be made in my procedure and apparatus without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Having thusdescribed my invention in an exemplary embodiment, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. An apparatus for rapid continuous electroplating, comprising a short plating tank having a pair of opposite walls provided with horizontal openings through which sheet metal to be electroplated may be passed flatwise in a horizontal path of travel, and through which electrolyte leaves said tank, a longitudinal conduit having transverse openings'in communication with the interior of said plating tank, said transverse openings being substantially at the level of said path of travel, directed toward said path of travel, and adjacent an edge of said metal to be plated, pump means for delivering electrolyte to said tank through said conduit and its said transverse openings, so as to produce rapid circulation of the electrolyte over all surfaces of said sheet metal, and at a rate to maintainan electrolyte level above said sheet metal and said horizontal openings, wiping means engaging the sheet metal adjacent said horizontal openings but beyond said tank to remove electrolyte therefrom and direct the electrolyte into receiving means, anodes in said plating tank above and below said path of travel, and means for making contact with said sheet metal located adjacent to but beyond said wiping means.

2. In electroplating, apparatus, a-plating tank, a pair of opposite walls of said tank having horizontal openings through which sheet metal to be plated may be passed through said tank flatwise in a horizontal path of travel, a longitudinal conduit having transverse openings in communication with the interior of said plating tank, said transverse openings being substantially at the level of said path of travel, directed toward said path of travel, and adjacent an edge of said metal to be plated, and pump means for introducing electrolyte into said tank through said conduit and its said transverse openings wherebyto pro,-

duce rapid circulation of electrolyte about the surfaces of said sheet metal in said tank, said horizontal openings being substantially larger than the work to be plated whereby a substantial quantity of electrolyte outflows from said tank around said work, and said means for introducing electrolyte being capable of supplying sufficient thereof to keep the level thereof above the said horizontal openings, said tank containing anodes closely adjacent said sheet metal and located above and below said path of travel in general alignment with said transverse openings, the said transverse openings being located to introduce electrolyte between said upper and lower anodes whereby to produce circulation about the adjacent surfaces of said anodes and means for making electrical contact with sheet metal passing through said tank.

3. In electroplating apparatus, a plating tank, a pair of opposite walls of said tank having horizontal openings through which sheet metal to be plated may be passed flatwise through said tank in a horizontal path of travel, a longitudinal conduit having transverse openings in communication with the interior of said plating tank, said transverse openings being substantially at the level of said path of travel, directed toward said path of travel, and adjacent an edge of said metal to be plated, and pump means for introducing electrolyte into said tank through said conduit and its said transverse openings whereby to produce rapid circulation of electrolyte about the surfaces of said sheet metal in said tank, said horizontal openings being larger than the work to be plated whereby a substantial quantity of electrolyte outflows from said tank around said work, and said means for introducing electrolyte being capable of supplying sufficient thereof to keep the level thereof above the said horizontal openings, said tank containing anodes closely adjacent said sheet metal and located above and below said path of travel, the said transverse openings being located to introduce electrolyte between said upper and lower anodes whereby to produce circulation about the adjacent surfaces of said anodes, wiping rolls for said sheet metal located outside said tank and adjacent said openings, means to catch electrolyte deflected thereby, and means for making electrical contact with sheet metal passing through said wiping rolls and tank, said means located adjacent said wiping rolls, said plating tank being located within a reservoir tank of larger dimensions horizontally, the end walls of said reservoir tank being of such height that the sheet metal can pass thereover, the said wiping rolls being located within the horizontal confines of said reservoir tank, said wiping rolls serving to direct the flow of said electrolyte into said reservoir tank and remove said electrolyte from said work.

4. In electroplating apparatus, a plating tank, a pair of opposite walls of said tank having horizontal openings through which sheet metal to be plated may be passed flatwise through said tank in a horizontal path of travel, a longitudinal conduit having transverse openings in communication with the interior of said plating tank, said transverse openings being substantially at the level of said path of travel, directed toward said path of travel, and adjacent an edge of said metal to be plated, and pump means for introducing electrolyte into said tank through said conduit and its said transverse openings whereby to produce rapid circulation of electrolyte about the surfaces of said sheet metal in said tank, said horizontal openings being larger than the work to be plated whereby a substantial quantity of electrolyte outflows from said tank around said work, and said means for introducing electrolyte being capable of supplying sufiicient thereof to keep the level thereof above the said horizontal openings, said tank containing anodes closely adjacent said sheet metal and located above and below said path of travel, the said transverse openings being located to introduce electrolyte between said upper and lower anodes whereby to produce circulation about the adjacent surfaces of said anodes, said plating tank being located within a reservoir tank of larger dimensions horizontally, the end walls of said reservoir tank being of such height that the sheet metal can pass thereover, pairs of wiping rolls for the sheet metal passing through said plating tank, said pairs being located outside said plating tank (but within the horizontal confines of said reservoir tank), and closely adjacent said openings in said plating tank, said wiping rolls serving to direct the flow of electrolyte into said reservoir tank and remove said electrolyte from said work, and contact rolls for said sheet metal located beyond said wiping rolls.

5. In electroplating apparatus, a plating tank, a pair of opposite walls of said tank having horizontal openings through which sheet metal to be plated may be passed flatwise to traverse said tank in a horizontal path of travel, a longitudinal conduit having transverse openings in communication with the interior of said plating tank, said transverse openings being substantially at the level of said path of travel, directed toward said path of travel, and adjacent an edge of said metal to be plated, pump means for introducing eelctrolyte into said tank through said conduit and its said transverse openings whereby to produce rapid circulation of electrolyte about the surfaces of said sheet metal in said tank, said horizontal openings being larger than the work to be plated whereby a substantial quantity of electrolyte. outflows from said tank around said work, said means for introducing electrolyte being capable of supplying sufiicient thereof to keep the level thereof above the said horizontal openings, said tank containing anodes closely adjacent said work and located above and below said path of travel, the said transverse openings being located to introduce electrolyte between said upper and lower anodes whereby to produce circulation about the adjacent surfaces of said anodes, said plating tank being located within a reservoir tank of larger dimensions horizontally, the end walls of said reservoir tank being of such height that the sheet metal can pass thereover, and pairs of wiping rolls for the sheet metal passing through said plating tank, said pairs being located outside said plating tank but within the horizontal confines of said reservoir tank and closely adjacent said openings in said plating tank, said wiping rolls serving to direct the flow of said electrolyte into said reservoir tank and remove said electrolyte from said work, and said means for introducing electrolyte into said plating tank including means for withdrawing electrolyte from said reservoir tank, whereby to maintain continuous circulation thereof, and contact rolls for said sheet metal located beyond, said wiping rolls.

6. In electroplating apparatus, a plating tank, a pair of opposite walls of said tank having horizontal openings through which sheet metal to be plated may be passed flatwise to traverse said tank in a horizontal path of travel, a longitudinal conduit having transverse openings in communication with the interior of said plating tank, said transverse openings being substantially'at the level of said path of travel, directed toward said path of travel, and adjacent an edge or said metal to be plated, pump means for introducing electrolyte into said tank through saidconduit and its said transverse openings whereby to produce rapid circulation of electrolyte about the surfaces of said sheet metal in said tanks, said horizontal openings being larger than the work between said upper and lower anodes whereby to produce circulation about the adjacent surfaces of said anodes, said plating tank being located within a reservoir tank of larger dimensions horizontally, the end walls of said reservoir tank being of such height that the sheet metal can pass thereover, pairs of wiping rolls for the sheet metal passing through said plating tank, said pairs being located outside said plating tank but within the horizontal confines of said reservoir tank, and closely adjacent said openings in said plating tank, said wiping rolls serving to direct the flow of said electrolyte into said reservoir tank and remove said electrolyte from saidwork,

and means for making electrical contactwith said work comprising pairs of conductive pinch rolls located so as to be separated from said plating tank by said wiping roll pairs at each end of said plating tank.

'7. In electroplating apparatus, a plating tank, a pair of opposite walls of said tank having horizontal openings through which sheet metal to be plated may be passed flatwise to traverse said tank in a horizontal path of travel, a longitudinal conduit having transverse openings in communication with the interior of said plating tank, said transverse openings being substantially at the level of said path of travel, directed toward said path of travel, and adjacent an edge of said metal to be plated, and pump means for introducing electrolyte into said tank through said conduit and its said transverse openings whereby to provide rapid circulation of electrolyte about the surfaces of said sheet metal in said tank, said horizontal openings being larger than the work to be plated whereby a substantial quantity of electrolyte outflows from said tank around said work, and said means for introducing electrolyte being capable of supplying sufficient thereof to keep the level thereof above the said horizontal openings, said tank containing anodes closely adjacent said work and located above and below said path of travel, the said transverse openings being located to introduce electrolyte between said upper and lower anodes whereby to produce circulation about the adjacent surfaces of said anodes, said plating tank being locatedwithin a reservoir tank of larger dimensions horizontally, the end walls of said reservoir tank being of such height that the sheet metal can pass thereover, and pairs of wiping rolls for the sheet metal passing through said plating tank, said pairs being located outside said plating tank but within the horizontal confines of said reservoir tank, and

closely adjacent said openings in said plating tank, said wiping rolls serving: to direct thejflow of, said electrolyteinto said reservoir't'ankand remove said electrolyte from said sheet metal, and means for, making" electrical contact with said sheet metal comprising pairs of pinch rolls :located so as to be separated from, said plating tank by said wiping rollpairs, said pairs of pinch rolls being alsolocated'above said reservoir tank.

8. In electroplating apparatus, a plating tank, a pair of 'opposite'walls of'said tank having horizontal openings through which sheet'metal to be plated may be passed fiatwise to traverse said tank in a horizontal path of travel, means for introducing electrolyte into said "tank at the level of said path'of 'travel'whereby to produce rapid circulation of' electrolyte about the'surfaces' of said sheet metal in said tank,j said openings being larger than the work to i be pla'tedi whereby'a substantial quantity of electrolyte outflows from said tank around, 's'aid work, said means for intro- 'ducing electrolytev "being capable of supplying sufi-lc'ient thereof 'to keep thelevel thereof above they said openings, said tank'fcontai'ning sets of individual anodes closely adjacent said sheet pai rs of wiping rolls for the sheet metal passing through said plating'tankfsaid pairs being located outside said plating tank but within the horizontal confines of said reservoir tank, and closely adjacent said openings in said plating tank, said wiping rolls serving to direct the flow of said electrolyte into said reservoir tank and remove said electrolyte from said sheet metal, and means for making electrical contact with said work comprising pairs of pinch rolls located so as to be separated from said plating tank by said wiping roll pairs, said means for introducing electrolyte comprising a weir against a longitudinal wall of said plating tank, said wall having openings in communication with said weir.

9. In electroplating apparatus, a plating tank, a pair of opposite walls of said tank having horizontal openings through which sheet metal to be plated may be passed flatwise to traverse said tank in a horizontal path of travel, means for introducing electrolyte into said tank at thev level of said path of travel whereby to produce rapid circulation of electrolyte about the surfaces of said sheet metal in said tank, said openings being larger than the work to be plated whereby a substantial quantity of electrolyte outflows from said tank around said work, said means for introducing electrolyte being capable of supplying suificient thereof to keep the level thereof above the said openings, said tank containing sets of individual anodes closely adjacent said sheet metal and located above and below said path of travel, the electrolyte introducing means being located to introduce electrolyte between said upper and lower anode sets whereby to produce circulation about the adjacent surfaces of said anodes, said plating tank being located within a reservoir tank of larger dimensions horizontally, the end walls of said reservoir tank being of such height that the sheet metal can pass thereover, pairs of wiping rolls for the sheet metal passing mesa 11 through said plating tank, said airs being lo- 'cated outside said plating tank but within the horizontal confines of said reservoir tank, and closely adjacent said openings in said plating tank, said wiping rolls serving to direct the flow of said electrolyte from said sheet metal, and means for making electrical contact said work comprising pairs of pinch rolls located so as to be separated from said plating tank by said wiping rollpairs, said means for introducing electrolyte comprising a weir against a longitudinal wall 6f said plating tank, said wall having openings in communication with said weir, said individual anodes extending longitudinally of said plating tank and the anodes or each set being spaced by longitudinal insulative members with edges extending beyond the surfaces of said anodes toward said path of travel.

' 10. In a continuous electroplating device or the like a horizontal plating 't'ank, 'upper and lower sets of beams extending transversely over said. tank and beyond the side edges thereof, longitudinal current carrying bars located adjacent theside edges of said tank and supported respectively by said beams, conductive strap members depending from said "bars and terminating downtvardly in upper and lower sets of lateral bars within said tank, longitudinally arranged anode members supported at their ends by the last men I 'tioned sets of bars, said anode members forming respectively a set above and below work passing "through said tank, abutments located beyond the "lateral edges of said tank, and jack like adjustment means located between said abutments and "the ends of said first mentioned beams whereby "is v 12 said anode sets may be raised and lowered with respect to work passing through said tank.

11. The structure claimed in claim 10 wherein the work enters and leaves said tank through end. walls having horizontal openings, said tank including a longitudinal weir at the level of said REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,768,358 Harrison June 24, 1930 2,307,928 Hogaboom Jan. 12, 1943 2,326,624 Csanyi Aug. 10, 1943 2,377,550 Hall June 5, 1945 2,382,018 Martin Aug. 14, 1945 2,399,254 Rieger et a1 Apr. 30, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 479,896 Great Britain Feb. 14, 1938

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Classifications
U.S. Classification204/207, 204/288.3, 204/237
International ClassificationC25D7/06
Cooperative ClassificationC25D7/0614
European ClassificationC25D7/06C