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Publication numberUS2512847 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 27, 1950
Filing dateDec 9, 1943
Priority dateDec 9, 1943
Publication numberUS 2512847 A, US 2512847A, US-A-2512847, US2512847 A, US2512847A
InventorsConterman Fred A
Original AssigneeJamestown Metal Equipment Comp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Washing machine
US 2512847 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 27, 1950 F. A. coNrERMAN WASHING MACHINE '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. 9, 1943 aal@ ab B8 `lune 27, 1950 F. A. CONTERMAN WASHING MACHINE Filed Dec. 9, 1945 a l Toc/WMA 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 F. A. CONTERMAN WASHING MACHINE June 27, 1945.0

Filed Dec. 9, 1945 June 27, 1950 F. A. coN'n-ERMAN 2,512,847

WASHING MACHINE Filed Dec. '9, 1945 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 June 27, 1950 F. A. coNTr-:RMAN

WASHING MACHINE 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Dec. 9, 1945 me/who@ FRED H. ConTERMnn.

j@ 27, 195() F. A. coNTERMAN 2,512,847

WASHING MACHINE Filed D90. 9, 1943 7 Sheets-Sheet 7 f1 E'. /Z

F650 l; Con/TERME.

o Patented June 27, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE WASHING MACHINE Fred A. Conterman, Jamestown, N. Y., assignor to Jamestown Metal Equipment Company, luc., Jamestown, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application December 9, 1943, Serial No. 51%,509e

(Cl. (isf-23) 16 Claims.

This invention relates to improvements in washing machines of the type in which a single receptacle is utilized to both wash and centrifugally dry clothes.

In devices oi' this nature it is customary to provide a receptacle in which may be placed the clothes to be washed, rinsed, and dried. The receptacle includes a support on which it may revolve and, in some instances, the support includes an oscillating member directly connected with some form of agitator within the receptacle. During a washing operation, little or no vibration vwill occur due to the fact that such operation is eilected by some form of oscillating agitator. However, in the operation of drying clothes it is necessary to rotate the receptacle at a high rate of speed and, since the clothes are never uni- Iormly distributed within the receptacle, an unbalanced condition exists. This unbalance, even though relatively slight, develops a considerable :vibration of the entire washing machine when the receptacle is rotated during a drying operation and results in a tendency of the machine to move or creep about, in addition to causing wear and breakage of many parts critically affected by such vibration. To overcome this difiiculty, many ingenuous vibration absorbing structures have been provided. However, since a laundry operation is invariably performed by persons untrained in mechanics, the washing machine is almost never lled to the same capacity, and anyvibration absorbixig device, to be satisfactory, would of necessity include soine means for automatically varying the extent of vibration absorption, since such vibration varies with the speed of rotation of the receptacle and the extent to which it is loaded.

A serious problem in devices of this nature concerns the condition of the wash and rinse water, It is well known that soap commonly used in laundering operations combines, to some extent, with calcium or other minerals in the Wash water, to form insoluble soap curds and that these curds, together with inorganic matter in the soiled clothes, present a considerable problem of disposal. For example, the soap curds and inorganu ic matter frequently are deposited as a lm or coating on the interior walls of the receptacle, agitator and, in many instances, partially or completely block the receptacle drain. Additionally, the curds and inorganic matter are difcult to control in a device wherein the clothes are to be dried in the washing receptacle by using such receptaclev as a centrifuge. Under these circumstances the clothes packing' or bunching against the side walls of the receptacle act as a lter for thewash water, leaving a residue of curds and inorganic matter on the clothes. To eliminate such deposits on the receptacle walls or clothes, various arrangements have been made by which to attempt to ilush and remove, by overflow and drainage, the soap curds and inorganic matter prior to the centrifugal drying operation. This procedure is objectionable because of the inability to thoroughly flush the clothes, as well as requirement of a considerable additional quantity of hot water for a complete washing and drying operation. o

The present invention is directed to and has for an object the provision of a washing machine of such construction and operative arrangement as to be capable of performing a complete operational cycle of washing, rinsing, and drying a quantity of clothes without the necessity of the operator handling these clothes from the time the cycle of operation starts until itis completed.

It is also an object of the invention to provide structure by which vibration of the receptacle, during a clothes drying operation, is so reduced or neutralized as to be of no consequence.

Another important object of the invention resides in the provision of means by which the wash water may be caused to circulate during a washing operation and, while circulating, will be cleansed of a substantial quantity of soap curds and inorganic matter. o

Another object of the invention resides in the provision of a driving mechanism that is unital with respect to its support or suspension and serves as a counterbalancing weight mass for the clothes receptacle, particularly during the drying operation.

The invention also includes the advantage of means for automatically obtaining a proper level of the wash water in the clothes receptacle and provision for reclaiming at least a part of the wash or rinse water for re-use in a successive washing or rinsing operation.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be more fully understood from a consideration of the following specification, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings; and in which Fig. 1 is a vertical sectional view of a machine embodying one form of the invention with additional parts broken away, being taken substan- 1 tially on the line i-i of Fig. 3;

parts being broken away and sectioned to illustrate certain of the structural details;

Fig. is a horizontal sectional view taken substantially on the line 5-5 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 6 isan enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view of the mounting and support for the clothes receptacle and the entire drive mechanism;

Fig. 'I is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of the drive mechanism showing in greater detail and in section a part of the structure of Fig. 5;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view of the clutch mechanisms in position of engagement and disengagement reverse to that shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 9 is an elevational view of a part of the structure located exteriorly of the machine and enclosed by a suitable channel member;

Fig. 10 is a plan view of the float devices located within the machine tub beneath the clothes receptacle;

Figs. 11 and 12 are fragmentary vertical and horizontal sectional views, respectively, of the connection betweenone oi.' the float devices and the clothes receptacle control lever;

Fig. 13 illustrates one type of connection that may be employed as between the receptacle control lever and the receptacle drive mechanism;

Fig. 14 is an enlarged fragmentary plan view of a two-way valve structure shown in Figs. 1 and 9;

Fig. 15 shows in plan and elevation the operative position of a braking device for the recep tacle; and

Fig. 16 shows in plan and elevation the inoperative position of the braking device of Fig. 15.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, the reference numeral I0 is employed to generally designate a washing vmachine embodying one form of the invention. The machine comprises a base Il, substantially circular in cross section. Reinforced portions |2 at the lower edge of the base mount suitable feet I3. These feet, as shown, are adjustable to level the machine. The upper edge or rim of the base portion ll may be tted with a gasket I4 that forms a combined seat and seal for the inwardly offset base I6 of a tub I1. The upper rim of the tub m-ay, for convenience of assembly and use, be formed with an'inwardly offset flange I8, on which is a gasket I9. This gasket serves to seat the flanged rim 2| of a top 22 to the machine. An aperture is made in the top 22, being closed by a cover 23 that may be of the contour and proportions shown in the drawings, and is mounted for pivotal movement on hinges 24. A suitable latch 26 on the cover serves to releasably engage it with the machine top 22.

The base I6 of the tub includes an upwardly and inwardly inclined central portion 21 that terminates in a flange 26 which defines a central opening. The base member I I includes a support 2l. This support is upwardly and inwardly inclined and includes an annular bottom ange 3|, welded or otherwise suitably joined to the inside wall of the base member Il. The top of this support terminates in an annular flange or seat 32, having a rim 33 that denes a central opening 34. It will be noted that the annularange 22 of the tub I1 rests on the seat 32, a. suitable gasket 36 being interposedbetween these meeting surfaces. A saddle 31 is supported by its annular flange 38 on the flange 28 of the tub base I6, a suitable gasket 39 being interposed between these surfaces. Any suitable means may be employed to rigidly secure flanges 33, 23, and $2, such as the use of a ring 4|, having threaded apertures with which studs 42 engage. The ring 4I may be permanently joined to the flange 32 and, as shown, the saddle flange 3B may be formed with an interior offset to receive the rim 33. The top 43 of the saddle is formed with a central opening 44. Mounted on the top 43 of the saddle is a rubber or other resilient ring 46. This ring may include permanently bonded top and bottom plates 41 and 48, the bottom plate 46 serving to anchor the heads of bolts 49 embedded in the ring. The bolts 49 project through suitable apertures in the saddle top 43 and are en- Saeed by nuts 5|.

Located within the base member il is a drive housing, generally designated by the numeral -52. This housing includes a portion 53 that terminates ln a vertical tube-like extension 54. The lower.` end of a sleeve 56 is force-fitted into the upper end of extension 54. At its upper end, this extension is externally threaded, and beneath `these threads is an annular shoulder 51. As shown in the drawings, the shoulder 51 forms a seat for `an inner extension of the top plate 41 of the resilient ring 46, suitable pins 58 being provided to secure'the extension 54 on center with the ring. The threaded portion of the extension 54 receives a supporting nut 59, above which is a lock-nut 6|. On the upper end of the extension is a spacer sleeve 62 that, at its upper end, is of a reduced diameter to mount a liquid sealing ring 63. interposed between the lower edge of the spacer sleeve 62and lock-nut 6| is a sealing ring 64, parts of the sealing ring and sleeve being intertted, substantially as shown. It will be noted that the inside diameter of sleeve 62 is substantially that of the inside diameter of the upper end of the housing extension 54, and sleeve 56 projects through and beyond the spacer sleeve. Pins 66 secure the spacer sleeve against rotation with respect to the housing'extension. Mounted. on the sleeve 56, directly above the upper end of spacer sleeve 62, is a bearing 61. An additional sleeve 68 serves to space bearing 61 from a further bearing 69.

' Above the bearing 69, the sleeve 56 terminates in an externally threaded portion with which a nut 1| is engaged. This nut, when turned down on the sleeve 56,l draws together bearing 69, sleeve .68, bearing 61, spacer sleeve 62, and forces all of these elements downwardly of the sleeve 56 into abutment with the upper end of the housing extension 54. Projecting upwardly through the housing extension 54, and sleeve 56, is a drive shaft 12. The upper end of this shaft is splined, as at 13. It will be particularly noted that this shaft is of lesser diameter than that of the interior of the sleeve 56 and may be said to float with respect to this sleeve.

In the tub I1 is located a clothes receptacle 10. This receptacle comprises side walls 14 that may include a series of inner projections 16. The rim 11 of the receptacle may be rolled inwardly, substantially as shown, and beneath this rim the walls 14 are formed with openings 18, the number and diameter of which being predetermined for a purpose hereinafter more speciiically described. The present disclosure of the invention shows the receptacle provided with a base 19, having a slight upwardly inclined area that terminates in'a hub 8|. If, as in the present showing, no separate agitator is provided, the hub 8| and base 19 may include attached or integral agitator blades 82. Adjacent the edge of the base 19 is a fiat area 83, trough 84, and depending rim or ange 86. The rim 86 is of a diameter to fit within the wall 14 of the receptacle, being secured thereto in any suitable manner, as by y rivets 81. The rim 86 may either be of such thickcludes a, depending annular rim 89 that encloses, without contacting, the spacer sleeve 62. Also the interior walls of this hub include a shoulder 9| with which the outer race or bearing 61 engages. Above the shoulder 9| is a further shoulder 92 which determines or limits downward adjustment of the bearings and associated parts on sleeve 56 when the nut 1| is rotated. It will be observed that the lower portion of the hub combines with spacer sleeve 62 and sealing ring 63 to' provide an air pocket which serves to prevent penetration of water to the bearing 61.

A cap 93 includes a flange 94 mounted on the upper end of the hub 8| and is secured thereto by studs 96. A resilient sleeve 91 is bonded to the interior walls of the hub. A splined fitting 98 is bonded to the interior surface of the resilient sleeve 91 and engages the splined end 13 of the drive shaft 12. From the structure thus -far-described it is evident that the drive shaft 12 does not support any of the weight of the receptacle and contents, its sole purpose being to effect oscillation or spinning of the receptacle, as the case may be.

With the exception of the tube-like extension 54, the drive housing 52 is located entirely within the base beneath the support 29, and derives its entire support through said tube-like extension 54. In other words, the drive housing, drive members located therein, etc., are suspended through the mounting of the extension 54 on the saddle 31. The lower portion of the housing includes a tubular member 99 that is joined along an upper flange to the lower rim of the portion 53 in any suitable manner, as by studs |02. A lateral extension |03 of the tubular portion 99 mounts a gear |04. A cover plate |05 completes the enclosure for this gear and serves as a bearing for the gear shaft |06 which, above the cover plate, includes a crank arm |01. One end of a rod |08 is pivotally joined to the crank |01, the

' other end of this rod having pivotal connection,

as at |09, with a member of a jaw clutch ||0. The lateral extension |03 includes an offset depending portion ||2 in which is located a shaft |3. This shaft, beneath the portion |2, mounts a pulley Il |4, and within the housing extension |03, mounts a gear 6 that meshes with gear |04.

The shaft 12, at its lower end and beneath the drive housing structure above described, is splined, as at ||1, and mounts a drive shoe ||8 that forms part of a friction clutch |20. A spring ||9 and lock plate |2| provide yielding pressure engagement of the surface |22 of the shoe with a corresponding surface |23 of a balance wheel |24. This wheel may be centrally recessed to receive the drive shoe |8 in substantially the manner shown, and includes a hub portion |26 on which is formed a pulley |21. The pulley |21 is in horizontal valignment with pulley ||4. Above the shoe ||8, the shaft 12 is provided with a bushing |28 that is fitted in one end of a sleeve -ed on this sleeve for relative rotation through a suitable bearing |3|,. Above and below this bearing are collars |32 and |33, the upper collar being pinned to the tubular portion 99, and the lower collar being held in place by a nut |34 engaged with the,A lower end of the sleeve 29. Suit- 1, able top and bottom fluid seals |36 may be provided as shown.

The upper end of sleeve |29 projects into the portion 53 of the drive housing and is internally fitted with a bushing |31.' This last mentioned sleeve engages the shaft 12l and, together with bushing |28, provides the entire bearing support for shaft 12. Externally of theupper end of sleeve |29 is a further bushing |38 which mounts the part of jaw clutch ||0. A suitable bearing ring or its equivalent |39 may be mounted on the sleeve |29 between the part and the upper end of the tubular housing 99. As is common in jaw lclutches, thev part on its upper rim is provided with a series of teeth |4I.

The other part |42 of the jaw clutch includes -teeth |43 engagea-ble with teeth 4|. The hub |44 of this portion of the clutch is pinned to the shaft 12. Above the hub |44 is a bearing |46 that mounts acollar |41. The upper end of the collar |41 is closed and sealed by a cap ring |48 pinned to the shaft 12. A pair of diametrically opposed stub shafts |49 mount corresponding ends of arms |5| of a yoke |52. Extensions |53 mount the yoke |52 for swinging movement through a pin |54 carried by lugs |56 on one side wall of the portion 53 of the housing. It will of course be understood that this side of the housing 53 is suitably apertured for this purpose, through the web portion |51 of yoke |52. A tension spring |50 is connected between yoke |52 and a suitable fastening on housing 53 to urge the yoke in a downward direction and aid in meshing clutch jaws |43 and |4|.

Adjacent the collar |41, the housing portion 53 is provided with a boss |6| that mounts a pair of parallel proximate pins |62. These pins support corresponding ends |63 of a pair of semi-circular brake-shoes |64. The free ends |66 of these shoes include pins |61 connected by a spring |68. This spring yieldingly urges the shoes into a position such that the lining |69 thereof will engage the drum |1| formed on the part |42 of the jaw clutch. The portion 53 of the housing includes la boss |12 fitted with a sleeve |13 through which a. shaft |14 projects. Mounted on the inner end of this shaft is a cam |16.l The end of the shaft beyond the cam is fitted with a spreader pin |11 which projects between the free ends |66 of the brake-shoes. This pin, in one rotative position of shaft |14, holds the shoes out of contact with the drum |1|, whereas in the other rotative position of this shaft, the pin frees the shoes for contact with the drum, under a pressure determined by the spring |68. Shaft |14 is coupled with a shaft |18 through a tubular member |19. This shaft is supported in a bushing |8| secured to the side wall of the base directly beneath the inclined wall of the support 29. Bushing |8| also mounts one end of an adjustable strap |80. Secured to the outer end of this shaft is a pulley |82 that isengaged by a belt |83. As may be observed from an examination of Figs. 1 and 3, the Washing machine includes substantially full length front and rear channel-members |84 and |86, respectively. Channel member |84 is secured in any suitable manner to the machine and,

with the upper end of strap |80 to mount a pin |81. Exterlorly of the member |84, the pin carries an operating lever |88 and within this member the pin mounts a pulley |89 that is also engaged by the belt |83. To prevent lost motion, the belt may be pinned, as at |9|, to pulleys |82 and |89. Movement of the lever |88 from a vertical toward a horizontal position rotates shaft |14, changing the position of cam |16 and either expanding the brake-shoes |84 or allowing them, under tension of spring |68, to engage the drum |1|. Enclosed by the channel member |84, and located slightly beneath and to one side of the pulley |89, is a structure by which to lock operating lever |88 in a neutral or inoperative position, should certain conditions of operation of the machine not be met. This mechanism includes a collar |92 secured to the wall of the tub l1 and in which is mounted a pin |93. This pin supports one end of an arm |94, to the other end of which is attached a liquid-level oat |96. The pin |93 extends to one side of the collar |92 and is fitted with an arm |91, on the free end of which is a shoulder or ledge |98. A pin |99 cooperates with the ledge |98, as follows: Should water in the tub l1 attain a greater than desired level for the operation of spinning the receptacle 13, float |96 Will be raised, and through pin |93 and arm |91, will cause the ledge |98 to move into a position beneath the pulley pin |99. Thus, the operating lever |88 cannot be rotated in a direction to start the receptacle spinning. Mounted within the channel member |84, above the lever |88, is a switch box 20| tted with a suitable knob 202 and serves to start and stop operation of the machine.

Attached to the portion 53 of the drive housing 52 by means of a bracket 203 is a motor 204. This motor is disposed vertically and includes a drive pulley 206 so located as to be in operative alignment with pulleys |I4 and |21. For proper suspended weight distribution about the portion 53 of the housing, the motor 204 is located substantially opposite the housing extension |03. Further mention of this will be made following description of other parts associated with and suspended by the housing portion 53.

Substantially opposite the shaft |14 that controls operation of the jaw clutch, the flange attached to the housing 53, mounts a laterally offset arm 201 that terminates in a vertical boss 208. This boss is drilled to receive pin 209 which in turn pivotally mounts a pair of arms 2|| that form part of a tubular member 2|2. The member 2|2 on its upper end mounts a pump 2| 3 which includes a shaft 2|4 located within this member. The lower end of this shaft is ltted with a pulley 2|6, whereas the upper end mounts the pump impeller blades 2H. A cover plate 2|8 closes the top of the pump 2|3 and includes a hose or iiexible tube connection 2| 9. An arm 22|, joined to or integral with the tubular member 2 2, provides connection for one end of a spring 222, The other end of this spring is attached to a bracket 223 on the housing 53 and urges the pump in a circular path about the pin 209 in a counter-clockwise direction, as viewed in Fig. of the drawings. Pulley 2|6 is also in operative alignment with motor pulley 206 and pulleys |4 and |21, and an endless belt 224 or other drive means engages these pulleys in the manner indicated in Fig. 5 of the drawings.

rectly over pulley ||4, then around pump pulley 2|6, thence around pulley |21, returning to the It will be observed that the beltk 224, on leaving the motor pulley 206, passes dimotor pulley 206. The position of the pump il such that it serves, through spring 222, as a tightener for the'belt 224.

Located in the lowermost portion of the base I6 of the tub is a drain that includes a collar 226. The collar` extends beneath the base and may be fitted with and supports a trap 221. This trap at one end includes a hose or flexible tube fitting 228 and a. hose 229 connects fitting 228 with the pump iitting 2 I 9. In this manner water within the tub |1 may be withdrawn by the pump.

The base adjacent the pump 2|3, is apertured to receive a two-way valve structure 29| that includes an outlet or drain pipe 232, a further outlet connection 233, and a flexible hose connection 234. A hose 23,6 connects the pump 2|3 through tting 231 with the two-way valve 23|. This valve, as shown in the drawing, includes a stopper 238 mounted for swinging movement on a shaft 239. With the stopper 238 in the position shown in Fig. 5, water withdrawn from the tub I1 through the pump 2|3 will pass into the connection 233; whereas, if the stopper is moved to close outlet 233, water withdrawn from the tub will pass out through the drain pipe 232. To assure proper seating of the stopper 230 in position to close either of the outlets 232 or 233, a spring toggle is provided. This includes a member 24| that at one end has a collar 282 mounted on the upper end of shaft 239. The other end of the member 24| mounts a pin 243. An extension 244 of this valve housing mounts a pin 206. This pin supports one end of a plate 241 having an elongated slot through which shaft 239 projects. This pin mounts one end of a spring 248, the other end of the spring being joined to pin 243. Thus, when shaft 239 is turned to shift the stopper, spring 248 exerts pressure to hold the stopper in the chosen closed position.

It will be noted that a part of the housing of the two-way valve 23| extends beyond the lateral limits of the base and the channel member |86 serves to enclose this structure, together with other parts connected therewith. Furthermore, this channel member is preferably similar in size and appearance to the channel member |84 and is preferably located diametrically opposite, substantially as indicated in the drawing, thus prof viding uniform and balanced enclosures for those parts necessarily located exteriorly of the base ll and tub il.

The upper end of the channel member |86. extends over the top of the machine to form an enclosure 25|. A shaft 252 constitutes an upward continuation of the shaft 239, being coupled thereto through the collar 242. This shaft terminates in a valve handle 253 located above the enclosure 25|. The outlet 233 of the two-way valve 23| connects with a vertically extending pipe 254 located in the channel member |86. This pipe projects horizontally through a suitably framed opening in the curved portion of the top 22 into the top interior of the tub As may be seen in Figs. 2 and 3 of the drawings, the horizontal extension 256 terminates in an outlet member 251. This member is attached to the top 22 at substantially its center, the cover 23 (see Fig. 3) being contouredto provide for this. Depending from the member 251 is a resilient bell 258. This bell encloses the cap 93 that is mounted on the hub 8| Within the receptacle '13.

Projecting into the enclosure 25| are conventional hot and cold water pipes 260 and 259. Ihese pipes terminate in a mixing chamber 26|. Associated with this chamber is a water actuated member 266' which is secured at its upper end to the tub wall by a. bracket 261, and at its lower end terminates in a housing 268. This housing opens into the interior of the tub |1 andgpivotally mounts one end of an arm 269. The free end of this arm lies within the tub and mounts corresponding 'ends of rods 21|. These rods are bent to conform to the tub contour and, at their free ends, floats 212 are provided. As is evident from Figs. l and of the drawings, floats 212 are effected by water contained in the lower part of the tub |1, beneath the receptacle 13. With no water in the tub, oats 212 assume the position shown in Fig. l, whereas as the water level rises these floats move upwardly, causing arm 269 to move upwardly and raise plunger 264. Upward movement of the plunger serves to close valve 262, thus shutting 01T the Water supply from the mixing chamber 26|.

The enclosure 25|, as may be seen in Figs. 1

and 2 of the drawings, includes an inclined plate l213 on which are mounted hot and cold water control handles 214. These handles are adjacent the lever 253 which controls the direction of flow of water in the circulation system during various uses of the machine. The plan View of Fig. 3 clearly shows that motor switch 202, receptacle control lever |88, handle 26, and the controls on the enclosure 25| are all conveniently available to an operator from the front of the machine.

Having described the structural parts of the invention, a complete cycle of operation is set forth in order that the inventive features may be more fully understood. It is assumed that a quantity of materials to be washed have been placed in the receptacle 10. Lever 253 occupies the position indicated as Wash and, since this lever controls` the valve structure 23|, drain pipe 232 will be closed and connection 233 open. The switch 202 may be turned to start operation of the motor 204. However, since the lever |88 is in neutral position, operation of the motor neither causes the receptacle to oscillate nor spin. No disconnection being necessary in the present setup, the water pump 2 I3 functions with operation of the motor.

The desired combination of hot and cold water may be obtained by turning the control handles 214. This permits passage of water from any conventional source of supply into the mixing chamber 26|. The normal water pressure of the system causes valve 262 to open, thus holding rod 264 in depressed position and allowing water to pass through the primary line 263, outlet member 251, and bell 258 into the receptacle 13. As water flows into the receptacle at a rate determined by the valve 26|, a part of it passes therefrom through openings 88 into the lower part of the tub |1, from which it is withdrawn through the drain 226 by the pump 2| 3 and passes through valve 23|, pipe 254, secondary line 25S, and returned to the receptacle through bell 258. Inasmuch as the flow of water through openings 88 is less than the flow into the receptacle, the receptacle becomes iilled and a further iiow from the receptacle then takes place through openings 18 in the side walls thereof. From this point on during the operation preliminary to washing,

water, by passing both from openings 18 and 88, starts filling the base of the tub, thus raising floats 212 to a position such that arm 269 raises rod 2'64 and closes valve 26|. Closing this valve shuts off any further supply of water from the` main hot and cold water lines 258 and 259. A desired quantity of soap having been placed in the now lled receptacle, cover 23 is closed and secured by latch 26, and lever |88 rotated in a. direction to rotate cam member |16 to permit spring actuation of yoke |52 to engage the teeth of the jaw clutch I0. Prior to this, and from the time of turning on the switch 202, the motor has not only been actuating the pump 2|3. but also caused the balance wheel |24 to rotate at a predetermined speed.

Engagement of the jaw clutch connects drive shaft 12 with the oscillating mechanism and thus the receptacle 10 is set in motion in a manner to produce washing agitation. During the entire washing operation, pump 2 I3 is operating to eiect circulation of the water; that is, water is constantly passing out of the openings 88 into the base of the tub, through trap 221 and thence again into the receptacle through the secondary pipe 256. It will be noted that the bottom edge of the water egress bell 258 is well below the normal washing water level determined by receptacle openings 18, for the purpose of preventing an abnormal amount of suds foam accumulating on the top of the water surface in the receptacle. It is well known that soapy water, when moved under pressure, will burst into foam when ejected into the'atmosphere, and the loca.- tion of the bottom edge of bell 258 acts as a preventative. Of course as inorganic matter is freed from the materials being Washed, such matter will be caught in the trap 221 and the water returning to the receptacle 10 will be free of such matter. Thus, during the washing operation a large percentage of inorganic matter is completely removed from the wash water and the trap 221 materially assists in reducing the amount of subsequent rinsing necessary.

On the completion of the washing operation, the lever |88 is returned to a position to disengage the jaw clutch and stop oscillation of the receptacle. Such movement of the lever |88, however, does not stop operation of the pump 2| 3, and Aif it is desired to immediately dry the material within the receptacle, the lever 253 is rotated to the position marked Drain The pump now effects withdrawal of the water from the tub into the drain 232. When the receptacle 10 and the tub |1 are substantially free of water, the lever |88 may be rotated in a direction opposite that from which it was rotated to engage the jaw clutch. This movement of the lever causes cam |16 to move the collar |41 and drive shaft 12 upwardly. Such upward movement of the shaft engages the friction clutch by moving the drive shoe ||8 into a position such that the surface |22 thereof engages surface |23 of the balance wheel, the engagement of these surfaces being yieldable to an extent determined by the spring H9. Of course a measure of slippage occurs between the surfaces 22 and |23 during the period that the receptacle is accelerating to a spinning speed sufficient to dry the materials therein. The wet material in the receptacle is of considerable weight, and only a slow pickup to spinning speed would be possible with a motor of conventional size were it not for the fact that the balance wheel, being in motion, assists the motor during this period in producing an extremely rapid acceleration.

During the spinning operation, water extracted from the material within the receptacle leaves the receptacle through the openings 18 and 88, passing into the base of the tub from which it is withdrawn by the pump to the drain pipe 232.

On completion of the spinning operation, the lever |88 is again rotated to a neutral position, thus disengaging the clutch surfaces |22 and |23, and as the cam |16 is rotated to eilect disengagement of these clutch plates, the shaft on which it is carried rotates spreader pin |11 in a direction to allow brake-shoes |68, under tension of spring |88, to engage the drum |1| of the member of' the jaw clutch pinned to the shaft 12. The effect of this braking action is to so rapidly terminate, rotation of the receptacle 18 that should an operator of the machine inadvertently move the lever |88 beyond neutral position, and partially or wholly into a position to engage the jaw clutch, no damage would occur. The spreader pin |11 operates to hold the brake-shoes |84 out of cngagement with the drum |1| during both oscillation and spinning of the receptacle. It, of course, should be understood that when the machine is not in operation and the lever |88 is in neutral position, the brake-shoes are always in contact with the drum 1|. Thus, during filling and emptying the receptacle it is held against inadvertent rotation.

It is obvious that the tub i1 should not contain water to a level above the base of the receptacle at the beginning of or during the spinning operation, and should the trap become plugged, or a water shut of! valve fail to function, this might occur were it not for the provision of the protective mechanism in the form of float |86 that is associated with the lever |88. Should the level in the base of the tub rise above the level normally controlled by floats 212, float |98 will be raised and in so doing projects the ledge |98 of an arm |91 into the path of pin |98 carried by the pulley |88, and in consequence the lever |88 cannot be rotated in a direction to set the receptacle spinning but may be rotated in a direction to set the receptacle oscillating.

After the rst spinning or extraction operation has been completed, the clothes may be rinsed by repeating the washing operation as above, using only clear water without soap, or by proper manipulation of mixing and drain valves, rinsing may be accomplished during the extraction period. The number of rinses or method of rinsing is optional with the operator. It is also possible, at the option of the operator, through proper manipulation of controls, to collect and save a portion of the rinse water in the tub |1 for use in washing the next batch of clothes. The relationship of the size and number of openings 88 in the receptacle to the capacity of pump 2|8 is such that the water may be transferred from tub |1 to the receptacle 10, and it is only when the water level in the receptacle has reached the openings 18 that a balanced condition can be maintained.' In order to reach this balance, make-up water is added through the mixing valve.

Particular attention is directed to the fact that the receptacle 1|) and the entire mechanism for both oscillating and spinning it are resiliently supported at a point well above the center of gravity of this entire group of parts. Any unbalanced weight in the receptacle, such as wet clothes unequally distributed, will be compen- 12 sated for by the gyroscopic action of the rotating balance wheel and the fixed mass of the remainder of the drive mechanism, as, for example, motor, oscillating drive, water pump, housing, etc. The only unbalance in the system being in the receptacle at or near its base and close to the point of suspension, assures the weight mass, both revolving and stationary, being more than adequate to dampen or completely eliminate vibration of an unbalanced load in the receptacle.

From the foregoing it will be evident that the present invention not only utilizes a single receptacle for washing, rinsing and drying operations and provides for constant water circulation and purification, but also provides an entirely suspended drive mechanism serving as a counterbalance to reduce or altogether eliminate machine vibration common to oscillating or rotating receptacles having an unequal load .distribution. It will also be-evident that the structural parts are greatly simplified as to their number and ease of assembly.

Although applicant has shown and described only one form of his invention, it will be apparent to those skilled in the art that modifications or adaptations of the structure may be made `and are considered as being within the scope of the invention insofar as they are defined in the annexed claims.

Having thus set forth my invention what I claim as new and for which I desire protection by Letters Patent is:

1. In a washing machine, a rotatable receptacle. a drive mechanism, a housing for said mechanism including an extension adapted to support said receptacle, a drive shaft projecting through said housing and extension and having operative engagement with a hub in said receptacle, a clutch for operatively associating said shaft with an oscillating part of said mechanism, a further clutch for operatively associating said shaft with a rotating part of said mechanism, and means for effecting axial movement of said shaft to selectively4 and motive means for operating said mechanism and said balance wheel.

3. In a washing machine, a rotatable receptacle, a drive mechanism, a housing for said mechanism including upper and lower aligned extensions, a balance wheel carried by the lower extension, the upper extension serving to mount said receptacle, a drive shaft projecting through said housing and extensions and having operative association with said receptacle, clutches for operatively associating saidl shaft in a selective manner with an oscillating part of said mechanism and with said balance wheel, and motive means operatively associated with said balance wheel and said mechanism.

4. In a washing machine, a rotatable receptacle, a drive mechanism, a housing for said mechanism, an upper extension of said housing mounting said receptacle, a drive shaft projecting through said housing and having permanent operative association with said receptacle, a balance wheel carried by a lower extension of said housing, motive means for said balance wheel and said mechanism, clutches selectively operable to operate said shaft through said mechanism and said balance wheel, and brake means operable to prevent rotation of said shaft when said clutches are in an inoperative position.

5. In a washing machine, a rotatable receptacle, a. drive housing having an upper extension mounting said receptacla-a balance wheel carried by a lower extension of said housing and having operative association with suitable motive means, a drive shaft having `permanent operative association with said receptacle, clutch means carried by said shaft and operable by axial movement of said shaft to effect rotation of said receptacle through said balance wheel, and brake means operable to prevent rotation of said receptacle when said clutch means is rendered inoperative.

6. In a washing machine, a rotatable receptacle, a drive housing having an upper extension mounting said receptacle, a balance wheel carried by a lower extension of said housing and having operative association with suitable motive means, a drive shaft operatively associated with said receptacle, clutch means carried by said shaft, said means in operative position transmitting rotation of said balance wheel to said receptacle, brake means operable on said shaft to render said receptable non-rotatable, said brake means being so associated with said clutch means as to become inoperative when said clutch means is rendered operative.

7. In a washing machine having a rotatable receptacle, a support for said receptacle. a drive mechanism located beneath said receptacle carried by said support, a drive shaft projecting thru said mechanism into said receptacle and having operative association therewith, a balance wheel remote from said receptacle, said wheel being continuously operable during operation of said machine, clutch means for operatively associating said shaft with said balance wheel, and means resiliently mounting said support at a point above said mechanism and beneath said receptacle.

8. A washing machine comprising an enclosure, a rotatable clothes receptacle in the upper portion of said enclosure, a drive mechanism for rotating said receptacle, said mechanism being located beneath and having its vertical center substantially on center with the vertical center of said receptacle, a support member forsaid receptacle and said mechanism, means carried by said enclosure resiliently suspending said member at apoint intermediate said receptacle and said mechanism. a rotatable balance wheel remote from said receptacle, means operatively connecting said balance wheel directly with said mechanism, and other means selectively operable to operatively connect said receptacle with said balance wheel, the combined weight of said mechanism, balance wheel and member beneath the resilient mounting means being greater than thegweight of said receptacle and any contemplated clothes contents.

9. In a Washing machine, a rotatable receptacle, a housing mounting a drive mechanism, an extension on said housing serving as a support for said receptacle, a drive shaft projecting through said housing and extension and having operative engagement with said receptacle, means carried by a part of said housing mounting said shaft for axial movement, and means for axially moving said shaft into operative association with an operating part of said mechanism.

l0. In a washing machine, a rotatable recep-` tacle, a drive mechanism, a housing for said mechanism, a drive shaft projecting through said housing and having permanent operative engagement with said receptacle, a rotatable balance wheel carried by the lower end of said housing, clutches for operatively associating said shaft with an oscillating part of said mechanism and with said balance wheel, and motive means for operating said mechanism and said balance wheel.

1l. In a washing machine having a rotatable receptacle, a support for saidreccptacle, a drive mechanism located beneath said receptacle carried by said support, a drive shaft having operative association with said receptacle, a balance wheel remote from said receptacle, motive means for operating said mechanism and rotating said balance wheel, and clutch means for operatively associating said shaft with said balancing wheel.

12. In a washing machine, a rotatable receptacle, a drive housing having an upper extension mounting said receptacle, a balance wheel carried by a lower extension of said housing and having operative association with suitable motive means, a drive shaft operatively associated with said receptacle, clutch means, said means in operative position transmitting rotation of said balance Wheel to said receptacle, brake means operable on said shaft to render said receptacle non-rotatable, said brake means being so associated with said clutch means as to become inoperative when said clutch means is rendered operative.

13. In a washing machine, a rotatable receptacle, a housing mounting a drive mechanism, an extension of said housing serving as a support for said receptacle, a non-load carrying drive shaft projecting through said housing and extension and having operative engagement with said receptacle, means carried by a part of said housing mounting said shaft for axial movement, clutch means for axially moving said shaft into operative association with an operating part of said mechanism, and brake means operable on said shaft to render said receptacle non-rotatable when said clutch means is inoperative.

14. A washing machine comprising an enclosure, a rotatable clothes receptacle in said enclosure, a drive mechanism for said receptacle, a shaft for transmitting rotary motion to said receptacle, means providing resilient support for said receptacle and said mechanism at a point above their combined weight mass, rotatable means remote from said receptacle operably interposed between said drive mechanism and said shaft, and clutch means operable to connect said receptacle with said rotatable means through said shaft.

15. A Washing machine comprising an enclosure, a rotatable clothes receptacle in said enclosure, a drive mechanism for rotating said receptacle, a shaft for transmitting rotary motion to said receptacle, means providing resilient support for said receptacle and said mechanism at a point above the center of their combined weight mass, constant speed means adapted to be continuously operable by said drive mechanism, and clutch means for operatively connecting said constant speed means with said receptacle through said shaft in a manner to gradually accelerate rotation of said receptacle to the speed of said constant speed means.

16. In a washing machine having an enclosure, a rotatable receptacle in said enclosure, a housing,

:,slau'r 15 a drive mechanism mounted in said housing, an extension on said housing projecting into said enclosure, a drive shaft projecting through said housing and extension and having operative en gagemeni: with said receptacle, means providing resilient support for said housing, drive mechanism, and receptacle, further means mounting said drive shaft for axial movement, and still other means for axially moving said shaft into operative association with an operating part of said drive mechanism whereby to effect v operation of said receptacle.

FRED A. CONTERMAN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the ille of this patent:

UNITED STATES PA'I'ENrs Number Name Date 330,345 Nielsen et al. Nov. 10, 1885 1,483,326 Bock Feb. 12, 1924 Number Number 16 Name Date Hitchcock Aug. 28, 1934 Dransfeld Feb. 1.' 1938 Alexopoulos Aug. 9, 1938 Schellenberg Sept. 13, 1938 Johnson Jan. 17, 1939 Erban Apr. 12, 1940 Morgenstern Mar. 31, 1942 Engelke May 12, 1942 Henderson Nov. 3, 1942 Breckenridge et ai. Mar. 16, 1943 Patch Oct. 12, 1943 Clark Oct. 24, 1944 Clark Jan. 2, 1945 Clark Aug. 6, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain June 4, 1925 France Nov. 17, 1923

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2720953 *Jan 18, 1954Oct 18, 1955Gen ElectricDrive mechanism for automatic washing machine and the like
US2826056 *Aug 28, 1953Mar 11, 1958Easy Washing Machine Company LDrive for automatic washer
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US2947159 *Nov 18, 1958Aug 2, 1960Enrique FernandezClutching mechanisms for washing machines including an agitator
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US20100294006 *May 25, 2010Nov 25, 2010Adriano TebaldiSuspension assembly for laundry machine
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Classifications
U.S. Classification192/3.61, 192/12.00R, 210/380.2, 68/132, 68/23.3, 210/127, 68/18.00F, 210/363, 192/48.5, 68/208, 210/365, 74/572.4
International ClassificationD06F23/00, D06F23/04
Cooperative ClassificationD06F23/04
European ClassificationD06F23/04