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Publication numberUS2513008 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 27, 1950
Filing dateMar 30, 1948
Priority dateMar 30, 1948
Publication numberUS 2513008 A, US 2513008A, US-A-2513008, US2513008 A, US2513008A
InventorsDavis Lee Y
Original AssigneeDavis Lee Y
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Concrete form
US 2513008 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 27, 1950 Y. DAVIS 2,513,008

CONCRETE FORM Filed March 30, 1948 g Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. 0 .642- )fflw As Mai L. Y. DAVIS CONCRETE FORM June 27, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 30, 1948 3 1h Mumllulllllll g T"" u milli- INVENTOR. 4.616 I. 9/9176 Patented June 27, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 2,513,008 I I CONCRETE FORM Lee Y. Davis, Atlanta, Ga.

Application March 30, 1948, Serial No. 17,935 U 6 Claims. 1

This invention relates to building forms and adjustable scaifolding for positioning and manipulating the forms in the pouring of structural concrete in erecting building walls and the like.

The object of the present invention is to provide building forms, or concrete mold members, which are adjustably supported so that the forms may be moved upward as a wall is poured, whereby a set of forms may be used repeatedly to obtain a wall of desired height.

Another object of the invention is to provide such structure which may be vibrated as the concrete is poured to eliminate the necessity for tamping to prevent air holes in the finished wall.

A further object is to provide means for producing a hollow wall, or one with airspaces, by the use of cores, the vibrating means acting upon the core members in a manner similar to the main forms.

A still further object of the invention is to'provide in a device of this character a form which will give a desired pattern or texture to the finished wall, and, at the same time, be releasable from the wall and adjustable upward as the remainder of the assembly is moved upwardly.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent from the following description of one embodiment of the invention when taken in conjunction with the drawings which accompany and form a part of this specification.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is a vertical section through a portion of a concrete wall with the forms and adjustable scaffolding of the present invention in place;

Figure 2 is an elevational view of the structure shown in Figure 1, parts being broken away;

Figure 3 is a horizontal section taken on the line 3-3 of Figure 2;

Figure 4 is a perspective view of a portion of a form member and the scaffolding; and

Figure 5 is a detail in section of a core member and a portion of the vibrating mechanism.

The present invention, in general, is concerned with concrete building forms which are adjustably supported upon suitable scaffolding so that they may be moved upward as the pouring of the concrete progresses, the scaffolding carrying means to vibrate the forms to eliminate the necessity for tamping and still produce a finished wall free from air holes. The forms include core members so thata hollow wall construction may be made. I I LReferring to'the drawings, in detail, the invention comprises scaifolding I, mold formsz, and vibrating mechanism 3.

Scaffolding I consists of a plurality of spaced frame members, each of which includes a pair of supporting legs 4 and 5 of channel iron 'of a length to exceed the height of a normal single story building, leg 4 being the inner member of each pair, and leg 5 the outer member. Each pair of legs is joined at the top by a transverse brace strap 6 which positions the legs in proper spaced relation and completes the formation of the frame member. The individual frame members are tied together to form a unitary structure by means of a pair of longitudinal channels 1 secured to the top corners of each frame.

After the foundation 8 and floor *9 have been poured and are set, the scaffolding is set up with the inner legs 4 resting upon the fioor '9, the legs 4 being at a suflicient distance back from the outer edge of the foundation so that the wall to be erected will be [positioned midway between the legs 4 and 5. The 1egs5 will be outside the foundation in an overhanging position. Extensions II] are provided for legs 5 so that these legs may be supported from the ground. Extensions III are provided with U-shaped loops I I1 which serve as clamps and slip over the legs 5. An eccentric lever I2, mounted on a pin I3 carried between the legs of the U-clamp I I and passing through slots in the sides of the extension, serves to tighten the clamp around leg 5 and draw the leg and the extension tightly together. Extensions I0 are sufficiently long to provide considerable adjustment to take care of varied con ditions, and the extension either rests upon the ground, or is driven into the ground to gain a stable support. With the eccentric lever in release position, the legs are adjusted on the extensions until the scaffolding i perfectly plumb so that the concrete forms will have an absolute ly vertical movement to insure a plumb wall. This adjustable feature permits perfect aligning and leveling of the scaifolding even when the structure is erected upon a hillside.

Each leg of the scaffold is fitted .With two slidable supports [4 and 15 which are actually c01 lars of rectangular shape having square openings to receive the channel iron legs. Set screws l6 and I1 are threaded through the respective supports to bear against the legs to hold the supports in desired positions of adjustment.

Supports l4 and I5 hold the concrete forms 2 in proper position to receive the concrete mix. Each form member comprises a rectangular mold board I8 adapted to standin avertical position with its base resting upon the lower support members M. The front mold board may have projecting ribs l9 upon its rear face in any desired pattern to give a simulated brick, stone or other finish to the wall. Spacers 20 and 2! extending the full length of the mold members are hinged as at 22 and 23 to the top and bottom of the mold members to project at right angles thereto when in operative position and to be flush; with the top and bottom; edges of the mold boards; Spacers 2| rest upon supports I4, and spacers 20 upon supports l5. It will be noted that supports M are longer than supports l to extend beneath the lower edge of thermold; to carry the weight of the form so that no great strain is imposed upon the hinged? spacers. Spacers are of such width that whenabutting the scafifolding legs, they will position the forms with just the proper spacing between them to. form a wall of desired; thickness. Spacers 2! are samewhat W en p l videcli i h s uare notches 24 spaced along their edges. tofembr ace less: 5 at h caf ld not h are de eaa eh hav the r: nner e es abut. the l gs wh n t e me d e r s are nparalleli m wit the; "l ss.- e ehes wi prevent the f rm Ere a; heme i ac dv lenai ud al r- L tc es 25s an ifie ae p e ided o nr nt w rel m re: meat t e f m efore,- and: du in he, pe r:

tea at: th con r te-l Th a che a r vete e enemas: It and L and, their heels: e ds, we age penings. 27; and- 181a he p ce s ZO-and It l dee di q e tt e raholl w Wall, Yoke 9 suii ci ntJ nsth o. extend complet ly across mefm mber i. heze a fi ld nd m na ebo less and -e aq n posit on onh es at point-abo e e e m landih d y setserews i i hi tbeer u athe ss;- A b am- I, pl c l penhe y kes-tq supne taa n ity f con members- .2m Be m 1 setll st c x ensiv with h s m and s e iticned near hs-centers e he sekesgli smi r ayl et ha egs a d 5 t; e-eaaffe s place h b m; parall l withtheflrms nd d ectlyv r he enter! o ace-be een them- Game -3;: are elon ated 1 12??? which; are a ar i nr ross e qti m E ch at eye aupnen e dto perm tzit o be hung; fro bea 3,1: The eyegisrof substantially: he. ame; width he thick ss f am 7L 7 thabeam a permit thercorerme h r. lightrv rt ca me e enti w hz-lrespfict. to he b am; h le prev ntime; e movement-,. Th e ie: memb rs, are hn ded; en he e m a d r sit en .dv at e u lla-s edl nteth rea on n e ma e imin e: amn n t he ncr te Q pr nt: ai ho es: as n sh d, Wa t e ibra ing, mechan sm. s: prov de -r s, c m: prises a: plurality of horizontal shafts 34, 35, 355 1 and 18 hi h: we dr weh rom a met 3 Shafs at and; p or ed, n be r ng; blo ks 40,- which; areslidably mounted: on legs 4' and. 5, of the frame andheld;inpositions ofadjustment by means of set screws 4,1. Shafts 35, 36, and 3? are: J'Qurn led, rakes 2. eimilan wyokes l t a s mi arly;p e tienedba e scre s AT elt: 44 t mi' flpu l rh mot r haft p ss o er a pulley, 453011 shaftfil Shaft 31; carriesttw ad; diuanalts lle flfiv and: :1- l lt 8! pa s s. ver millet; 6: 10. nu ey Perisher-H81 and a-ihe t. 58 passes around pulley-41 tQ-a pulley 5] on shaft 36am; dri r ha haf -u Ane he p ey, 52; v o sham- 5 e esaaabe tl 5 dr ve; ulley.- B on sha t fin beltia rer rmllea Eltahcron shaft 3i5,.dr1ves/pu11em 515 on; shaft; 34.. 'llhus: all

rslightly longen-than the vertical depth of; r

4 of the shafts are driven, and rotate in the same direction. Each form member carries a plurality of brackets 58 fastened at spaced points along its side. The brackets extend upward and outward from the forms and terminate in a hook-like end of substantially inverted V-shape. Bearing blocks Ml are so adjusted that shafts Stand 38 are in contact with the undersides of the inverted V-portions of the brackets. Shafts 34 and 38 are of non-round cross section between bearing points; and the rotationof the shafts will cause impacts to be delivered to the brackets thus vibrating the form. Core members 32 are provided with openings 59 below eyes 33 to accommodate shaft 35. The openings are large enough to permit brackets 6&3 to be mounted therein, the bracketstbfiing. attached to the core members and resting upon shaft 3t which is also of non-round crossesection between bearing points. Rotation of shaft 36 will cause vibration of the core meme cth t the; se tl ng, cti n will, be. uniform ath: nwar ly, and eutwardly. othe p ured wall- M ter 31 s meun ed upon a platfo m 61 which is. carried: by. the inner adjustable s pp rt It.- w l e ev d nt, from th aboye that theenir assembly is adjvista-bk:v v o. that he forms, vibrating mecha 1 m.. ete.,, may be mov d. upw r s the wwl sinoured. The. front. mold memb n. f s i provided. with a ri patterns c nnot of course be moved strai ht up, as the, wall is 19.11.111 I mii t/firstbe moved outwardly o. r lease theribs from, thewall. To. accomplish this, he upper. forward. uppo t. v5 mustfir tbem9v d downward.-, Hinged. spacer may he l e. sw n ow ward, and spacer 2 h yvuna upward a t r catches, 2e, andzfi havebeen. relea ed; The farm is hen. free. t e movedoutwa dl'y todis eng ge he-ribs fromthe grooves. When. the en: tire assembly has been adjusted upwardly the f lon form. may then he p ac d in t p p position with lllafifi is swung torest uponthe upports L and 5, Latches 2.5 and Z6. w lLbe fas ened. nd h form will, be rigi y held in place. I a

While in. the. above there. has. been. disclosed one, em diment of h inv nti nhi w 1 par nt to, shilledin. th a t thatchanses may be. made w thou eparting. from the, mi o herapnendedclaims What is claimfidis;

1. Concrete forms comprising,atsaafioldinginludin pairs. of! le sthe hairs, being.v p e apart longitudinally f theg cafioldingland, the le s of a pair being spaced apart transversely of, the scaffolding, adjustable supports on said legs, a

fv me dbeardsadamed tabs. p oned, 1ons dinal; f, aid. c fiold g. e ween. the legs of each, pair and" rest, on, said, supports,, spacers hingedly connected to said moldhoards-gtolcontact said legs, raised to, position said? mold boards with respect to said scaffolding, and, to each other, and said spacers having notchfistto embrace said legs to prevent longitudinal move-v ment-of saidm old board's.

2 Goncrete'forms comprising, a scafi'oldingineluding pairs of legs; the pairs being spaced apart longitudinally-of the scaffolding and-the legs of a pair being spaced apart transversely of the scafiol'ding', adjustable supports on=said legs; a pairof mold boardsvadapted to be positioned longitudinalz of: said: scaffolding between the legsof each. pair and rest on' said supports,- spacers hingedlyr connected to: said mold boards to contact said legs when raised to position: said mold boards; with; respectazytoa said scaffolding: andi to each other, said spacers having notches to embrace said legs to prevent longitudinal movement of said mold boards, and latch members carried by the adjustable supports to engage said spacers to prevent said mold boards from moving toward or away from each other.

3. Concrete forms comprising, :a scaffolding including pairs of legs, the pairs being spaced apart longitudinally of the scaffolding and the legs of a pair being spaced apart transversely of the scaffolding, adjustable supports on said legs, a pair of mold boards adapted to be positioned longitudinal of said scaffolding between the legs of each pair and rest on said supports, spacers hingedly connected to said mold boards to contact said legs when raised to position said mold boards with respect to said scaffolding and to each other, additional adjustable supports on said legs, shafts journaled in said additional supports, said shafts between journal points being non-round in cross-section, brackets attached to the outer sides of said mold boards and having horizontal portion to rest upon the non-round portions of said shafts, and means to rotate said shafts.

4. Concrete forms comprising, a scaffolding including pairs of legs, the pairs being spaced apart longitudinall of the scaffolding and the legs of a pair being spaced apart transversely of the scaffolding, adjustable supports on said legs, a pair of mold boards adapted to be positioned longitudinal of said scaffolding between the legs of each pair and rest on said supports, spacers hingedly connected to said mold boards to contact said legs when raised to position said mold boards with respect to said scaffolding and to each other, yokes bridging each of said pairs of legs and adjustable thereon, a beam to rest upon said yokes, a plurality of core members each having an eye in its upper end whereby said core members may be threaded upon said beam to hang between said mold boards, additional adjustable supports on said legs, shafts journaledin said additional supports, said shafts between journal points being non-round in cross-section, brackets attached to the outer sides of said mold boards and to said core members and having horizontal portions to rest upon the non-round portions of said shafts, and means to rotate said shafts.

5. Concrete forms comprising, a scaffolding including pairs of legs, the pairs being spaced apart longitudinally of the scaffolding and the legs of a pair being spaced apart transversely of th scaffolding, adjustable supports on said legs, a pair of mold boards adapted to be positioned longitudinal of said scaffolding between the legs of each pair and rest on said supports, spacers hingedly connected to said mold boards to contact said legs when raised to position said mold boards with respect to said scaffolding and to each other, said spacers having notches to embrace said legs to prevent longitudinal movement of said mold boards, latch members carried by the adjustable supports to engage said spacers to prevent said mold boards from moving toward or away from each other, yokes bridging each of said pairs of legs and adjustable thereon, a beam to rest upon said yokes, a plurality of core members each having an ey in its upper end whereby said core members may be threaded upon said beam to hang between said mold boards, additional adjustable supports on said legs, shafts journaled in said additional supports, said shafts between journal points being non-round in cross-section, brackets attached to the outer sides of said mold boards and to said core members and having horizontal portions to rest upon th non-round portions of said shafts, and means to rotate said shafts.

6. Concrete forms comprising, a scaffolding including pairs of legs, the pairs being spaced apart longitudinally of the scaffolding and the legs of a pair being spaced apart transversely of the scaffolding, adjustable supports on said legs, a pair of mold boards adapted to be positioned longitudinal of said scaffolding between the legs of each pair and rest on said supports, spacers hingedly connected to said mold boards to contact said legs when raised to position said mold boards with respect to said scaffolding and to each other, at least the outer legs of said pairs having telescoping sections whereby the scaffolding may be plumbed, and clamps for holding said telescoping sections in positions of adjustment.

LEE Y. DAVIS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the 45 file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1289083 *Aug 3, 1917Dec 31, 1918John S BanksConcrete-wall mold.
US1641958 *Nov 16, 1925Sep 13, 1927Lee Bracey RobertWall mold
US1787449 *Jan 10, 1929Jan 6, 1931Corwill JacksonMethod of forming and molding concrete
US2045789 *Jun 28, 1935Jun 30, 1936Mcdowell James TElevating form for casting hollow concrete walls
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3089217 *Mar 10, 1960May 14, 1963Dino FilippiEquipment for concrete building construction
US5173309 *Aug 21, 1990Dec 22, 1992Belarde John FApparatus for forming concrete barriers
US5290492 *Jun 17, 1992Mar 1, 1994Belarde John FMethod for forming concrete barriers
US5533888 *Feb 28, 1994Jul 9, 1996Belarde; John F.Apparatus for forming concrete barriers
US5616291 *Jun 7, 1995Apr 1, 1997John-Wayne Construction Company, Inc.Method for forming concrete barriers
Classifications
U.S. Classification425/325, 425/432, 249/20, 249/16
International ClassificationE04G11/00, E04G11/22
Cooperative ClassificationE04G11/22
European ClassificationE04G11/22