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Publication numberUS2513145 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 27, 1950
Filing dateNov 27, 1946
Priority dateNov 27, 1946
Publication numberUS 2513145 A, US 2513145A, US-A-2513145, US2513145 A, US2513145A
InventorsChapple Charles C
Original AssigneeChapple Charles C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inhaler
US 2513145 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

C. C. CHAPPLE June 27, 1950 INHALER Filed Nov. 27, 1946 .WVEN TOR. L f1}: 1 6

Charges C. Clu

ATToRx 7-5 Patented June 27, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT 1 OFFICE INHALER Charles C. Chapple, Philadelphia, Pa;

Application November 27, 1946, Serial No. 712,619

7 Claims.

This invention relates to an inhaler and more particularly to an inhaler suitable for use with a medicinal powder which is to be administered by inhalation to the upper and lower respiratory tract.

In the past, the oral or nasal administration of medicinal powder has been accomplished by powder dispensers working on the ejector principle. The necessary airflow is supplied by applying pressure at the end of a tube opposite the dispensing end, the pressure normally being supplied by means of positive pressure. Such devices are cumbersome and obviously impractical for constant carryin in a pocket or other similar space on ones person. In addition, such devices are unsatisfactory due to the natural tendency to resist the entry of an external pressure into the nose or mouth.

An object of this invention is to provide a medicinal powder dispenser of the ejector type in which the airflow is supplied by the negative pressure of inhalation. Such a dispenser permits a great reduction in size and is satisfactory for carrying on the person. Further, a better distribution of powder to points remote from the mouth or nose results.

A further object of this invention is to provide an inhaler which does not require any movable sealing means such as caps, plugs or slides to 1 Q prevent unwanted leakage or spilling of powder Figure 2 is a section of the inhaler through the line 2--2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is a vertical section of the inhaler through the line 3-3 of Figure 1; and

Figure 4 is a vertical section of the inhaler through the line 4-4 of Figure 1.

The inhaler may be constructed of plastic or any other suitable material which will not react with the contained powder selected. The casi 2 is round. Insert 4 is located in the middle of the casing and fits closely to the interior surface of the casing 2. A medium sized main passage 6 runs through the insert 4 and the case 2. In the insert 4, small tubular passages 8, preferably extending at right angles to the main passage 6, connect the main passage 6 and grooves 10.

The ends of the casing 2 are closed by the inserts 12. The interior of the inhaler is connected to the atmosphere through the circuitous tubular passages 14 and the grooves IS in the 2 inserts l2 and the holes la in the casing 2. As shown in Fig. 3 the connections of the holes 18 with the grooves 16 are approximately removed from the points where the passages l4 enter the grooves I6.

The inhaler contains a medicinal powder 20. Any medicinal type powder or microcrystalline substance may be used, such as, for example, a sulfonamide such as sulfadiazine and sulfathiazole.

In order to prevent large clumps of powder from forming, irregularly shaped, and desirably sharp edged, particles 22 having considerable mass and inactive'with respect to the contained powder, such as, for example, glass and ceramic materials, may be mixed with the powder. These particles are of a size large enough to preclude the possibility of their entering the passages 8 or l4, but small enough so that they cannot prevent powder from entering the grooves 10.

No"movable sealing means are necessary to prevent the unwanted escape of powder when the inhaler is not in use. Thesize and the circuitous nature of the arrangement of the passages grooves l6 and holes 18 prevents any powder from escaping through this air inlet system. The small circuitous passages make the flow of powder negligible. On the other hand, the little powder that does work its way into the maze will be readily blown backinto the inhaler by the incoming air when the inhaler is used.

The prevention of leakage of powder through the passages 8 depends on the shallowness of grooves I!) which prevents any substantial mass of powder from accumulating over the passages 8 and forcing the powder through the passages 8.

It is apparent that the size of the passages 8 and I4 and the grooves l6 depend on the physical properties of the particular powder used.

To operate the oral inhaler, the user holds it so as to position either end of the passage 6 between his lips. By inhaling through this passage, an ejector action results causing the powder to be drawn into the passage 8, the passage 6 and thence into the respiratory tract. The powder, by the time it enters the mouth, is suspended in the air to form a cloud of powder. To replace the air evacuated by the ejector action, air fiows through holes l8, grooves l6 and passages [4 into the interior of the inhaler. It should be noted that, due to the construction of the inhaler, the user automatically holds it in the proper position.

When the inhaler is not completely full of powder, it is evident that only one of the passages 8, namely the lower one, will be in direct contact with the powder. However, it will be noted that air supplied at the ends of the inhaler will be drawn over the powder enroute to the upper hole 8. The action of the air on the powder is to stir it up and carry it off in a suspension. Thus the hole 8, which is in the upper position, also supplies powder to the passage 6.

It should be noted that the invention is not limited to the specific embodiment illustrated and described above, it: being apparent that various modifications may be made. For example, while the inhaler illustrated and described is for oral use, the features of this invention may be as readily embodied in a nasal inhaler. Again while the inhaler has been described as containing a powder, it will be understood that it. is

contemplated as adapted to contain liquid.

What I claim and desire to protect by Letters Patent is: I

1. In an inhaler, a casing, a partition member dividing the interiorof the easing into two chambers, a main passage through the partition member and opening through opposite sides of the casing, a transverse groove in the periphery of said partition member, a passage joining the main passage and the groove, said passagev being at lesscross-sectional area than the main pase sage and means at one end of the casing permitting the entry of air into the casing,

2. In an inhaler, a casing, a main passage through the casing and opening on opposite sides of the casing, a small passage, connectingthe main passage with the interior of the casing at apoint adjacent the interior surface of the easing, a closure at one end of said casing, a peripheral groove in said closure located at a point within the casing, an opening in the wall of said casing affording a passage for air intcsa-id groove and a passage in said closure afiording a passage for air from said groove to the interior of the casing, said passagev in the closure'opening. into the groove approximately 180 away from the opening in the wall. of the casing.

3. In an inhaler, a casing, an insert within the casing dividing the interior into. two compartments, a chamber within said insert and having an opening to the atmosphere through the wall of. the. casing, a small passage connecting said chamber with said compartmentsw inside the casand a circuitous air intake. passage. at one end of the casing. I

4, Inan inhaler, a casing, an insert. interior of the casing, a passage for inhalation, within said insert, said passage having an opening through the wall of. the casing and being connected. to the interior of the casing by a small passage, a closure at one end of said casing and a circuitous passage, formed in said closure for the admission of air to the interior of the casing.

5. In an inhaler, a, casing, a partition member dividing the interior of the casing into two compartments, a chamber within said partition member and having an opening through the wall of the casing, two transverse grooves spaced approximately 180 apart in the periphery of said partition member, passages joining the chamber and the grooves, and means at one end of the casing permitting the entry of air into the casing.

6. In an inhaler, a casing, a partition member dividing the interior of the casing into two compartments, a chamber within said partition member and having an opening through the wall of the casing, two transverse grooves spaced approximately apart in the periphery of said partition member, passages joining the chamber andthe grooves, a closure at one end of said casing, peripheral, groove. in said closure located at a point within the casing, an opening in the wall of said casing afiording a'passage for air into said groove, and a passage in said closure affording a passage for air from said groove to the interior of the casing, said passage in the closure opening, into the, groove approximately 130 away from the opening in the wall of the casing. I

v 'T. In an inhaler, a casing, a partition member dividing the interior of the easing into two compartments, a chamber Within said partition member and having an opening through the wall of the casing, a transverse groove in the periphery of said partition member, a, passage joining the chamber and the groove and means at one end of the casing permitting the entry of air into the casing.

CHARLES C. CHAPPLE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of thispatent:

STATES PATENTS Number Name 7 Date I 393,869 'W'arren Dec. 4, 1888 640,259 Ballou Jan. 2, 1900 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 545,565 Great Britain June 2, 1942 735,640 France Sept. 6', 1932

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US393869 *Sep 13, 1888Dec 4, 1888 Inhaler
US640259 *Jan 14, 1898Jan 2, 1900George D BallouInhaler.
FR735640A * Title not available
GB545565A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5642727 *Jul 25, 1995Jul 1, 1997David Sarnoff Research Center, Inc.Inhaler apparatus using a tribo-electric charging technique
US5687746 *Jun 7, 1995Nov 18, 1997Advanced Therapeutic Products, Inc.Dry powder delivery system
US5746227 *Jun 7, 1995May 5, 1998Advanced Therapeutic Products, Inc.Dry powder delivery system
US6595209 *Jan 30, 1998Jul 22, 2003Jed E. RoseDry powder delivery system
US8495998Jun 17, 2009Jul 30, 2013British American Tobacco (Investments) LimitedInhaler
US8561609Dec 7, 2011Oct 22, 2013Respira Therapeutics, Inc.Dry powder inhaler
US8651104May 11, 2012Feb 18, 2014Respira Therapeutics, Inc.Bead-containing dry powder inhaler
Classifications
U.S. Classification128/203.15, 604/60
International ClassificationA61M15/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61M2202/064, A61M15/00
European ClassificationA61M15/00