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Publication numberUS2514335 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 4, 1950
Filing dateMay 27, 1949
Priority dateMay 27, 1949
Publication numberUS 2514335 A, US 2514335A, US-A-2514335, US2514335 A, US2514335A
InventorsJesse C Owens
Original AssigneeJesse C Owens
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Marginal fastener strip for carpets
US 2514335 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 4, 1950 OWENS 2,514,335

MARGINAL FASTENER STRIP FOR cARPETs Filed May 27, 1949 5 C 4 7 7 y u rm m y 7 f V l P Z 6 2 5 6 2 j] 5 Patented July -4, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT o FFICE 14 Claims.

My invention relates to marginal fastener strips for carpets and included among the objects of my invention are:

First, to provide a marginal fastener strip for carpets which utilizes a base strip approximately the height of a carpet pad and so arranged as to be readily and dependently cemented and nailed to the iioor.

Second, to provide a marginal fastener strip for carpets which incorporates a simple yet novel means of initially supporting and securing devices, such as nails, to be driven into the floor.

Third, to provide a marginal fastener strip for carpets wherein novelly arranged staples are ernployed to engage and retain the carpet, the cross portions of the staples being so disposed relative to the underside of the base strip in which they are fastened so as to be embedded and anchored in the adhesive or cement employed to secure the marginal strip to a floor.

Fourth, to provide a marginal fastener strip for carpets which in one form may employ staples having special retainer recesses disposed so as to receive and engage the carpet backing.

Fifth, to provide a marginal fastener strip for carpets which is particularly arranged to permit use of wood or other inexpensive base material having relatively weak lateral strength, in that the staples employed to engage and retain the carpet, bridge and laterally reinforce the base material.

Sixth, to provide a marginal fastener strip for carpets wherein one form of the base member may be constructed of light-weight sheet metal channel and the staples employed to reinforce the base member as well as engage and retain a carpet thereover.

With the above and other objects in view as may appear hereinafter, reference is made to the accompanying drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is a fragmentary plan view of one forni of my marginal strip.

Figure 2 is an enlarged transverse sectional view through 2 2 of Figure 1, showing the condition of the base strip in position but before a securing device such as a nail has been inserted.

Figure 3 is a similar sectional view showing a nail inserted in and retained by the base strip before driving the nail into the overlying floor.

Figure 4 is an enlarged transverse sectional view taken through 4 4 of Figure 1, showing the .marginal strip in position with a carpet secured fthereby.

Figure 5 is a fragmentary plan view similar to Figure 1, showinga modified arrangement ofthe staples. v

Figure 6 is another fragmentary plan view similar to Figure 1, showing a further modified arrangement of the staples.

Figure 7 is a sectional View similar to Figure 4, showing a modied form of the carpet retaining staples.

Figure 8 is a transverse sectional view of a further modifled form of the marginal strip, in which the'base strip is formed of sheet metal built to dene a channel.

Reference is first directed to the construction shown in Figures 1 through 4. With this construction, a base strip l is provided, which for reasons of cost is preferably formed of wood, the grain of which runs longitudinally. The base strip is provided with a longitudinal groove or recess 2 along its underside and the edges are preferably undercut or beveled as indicated by 3.

The base strip receives a series of staples 4 which are U-shaped to form a straight cross portion 5 and right angularly extending legs 6. The staples are driven throughthe base strip from the underside in such a manner that the cross portions 5 bridge the longitudinal groove 2. The protruding portions of the legs 6 form pron-gs for retaining a carpet C. The base portions of these prongs adjacent the -base strip I, extend vertically for a heightcorresponding to the height of the backing B of the carpet. Above this point, the prongs are built to form inclined portions 'I directed toward the marginal portion of the carpet. The extremities of the prongs are sharpened.

The longitudinal groove 2 of the base strip is adapted to be lled with an adhesive material 8, which material surrounds, imbeds and anchors the cross portions 5 of the staples. After applying the adhesive the base strip is positioned on a floor adjacent the walls of a room. In many -instances the adhesive material itself is sucient to secure the base strip; however, it is desirable to augment the adhesive material by securing devices such as nails 9 driven downwardly through the base strip. For this purpose the base strip is provided with a series of nail guide sockets I0 which extend partitionally through the base strip, leavingr rupturable webs Il separating the sockets from the groove 2. With this arrangement the nails 9 may be forced by hand through the webs and in contact with the floor, whereupon they may be driven home without being manually held. This is of considerable practical importance for the reason that it is difficult and dangerous to hold the nails .when

surrounded by the protruding prong ends of the staples.

As shown in Figure 4, the base strip is equal in height to the carpet padding P, so that the carpet remains uniform in height without rise or depression at its margins. It is preferred to space the base strips a slight distance from the wall so that the margin of the carpet may be wedged between the base strip and the wall. By reason of the undercut edge 3 adjacent the wall, the margin of the carpet may be folded or crammed therein so that it is not readily raised by suction as may be produced by a vacuum cleaner.

The staples may be placed in the base strip in different patterns. For example, in Figure 1, the cross portions of the staples are at right angles to the base strip. In Figure they are disposed at an angle so that the prongs are staggered. In Figure 6 they are shown as being in angular right and left positions, so as to provide staggered front and rear pairs of prongs. This arrangement offers the advantage that the nail guide sockets are more accessible.

Reference is now directed to Figure 7. The structure here shown is essentially the same as the previously described structure, in that the base strip I2 is provided with a. longitudinally extending channel'or groove I3. Staples I4 are secured in the base str1p in the manner of the staples 4. The staples I4 include cross portions I5 and elongated legs I6, that is, the legs I6 are longer than the legs 6 of the first described structure in order that theymay project through a double thickness of carpet backing. In addition, the legs I6 are preferably provided with offset portions I1, which form grooves at the rear or marginal directed sides of the legs. The recesses thus formed are adapted to receive and retain the cording of the carpet backing B. It should be observed that while the legs I6 are shown as vertical, that they may be inclined as in the iirst described structure. It should also be observed that the base strips I or I2 may be provided with both staples 4 and I4, that is, both long and short staples. The long staples are particularly useful in installations where padding of extra thickness is employed and the margins of the carpet are doubled. Adhesive material 8 and nails 9 are employed as in the rst described structure.

Reference is new directed to Figure 8. In this construction a channel member I8 formed of relatively thin sheet metal is provided. The flanges of the channel member are directed downwardly and rest on the oor. The channel.

member receives a series of staples IB. Each staple includes a cross portion 2B and legs 2I. Each leg is provided with a step or offset shoulder 22, which underlies the web of the channel member. Immediately above the web of the channel member the legs are upset as indicated by 23,

`to engage and grip the material of the channel member. Above their upset portions the legs 2i form prongs which may take the form of the prongs shown in Figure 4 or Figure '7.

The channel member I8 is adapted to be filled with adhesive material 8, which material embeds and surrounds the cross portion of the staples. When the channel member is positioned on the floor, those portions -of the staples which are underneath the channel member serve to reinforce and support the web of the channel memm ber against crushing. Nail holes are provided inthe channel lmember at Vintervals between the `staples so that the reinforcing afforded by the .disposed with their cross portions within said channel and traversing said base member and their legs projecting upwardly through said base member to receive and secure a carpet; said cross portions being spaced, at least in part from the surface of said channel whereby adhesive material lling said channel may be forced around and imbed said cross portion.

2. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising: a base member, having a longitudinal channel along its underside; a series of staples disposed with their cross portions within said channel and traversing said base member and their legs projecting upwardly through said 'base member to receive and secure a carpet; the protruding portions of said legs having a vertical portion adjacent said base member and inclined extremities.

3. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising: a base member, having a longitudinal channel along its underside; a series of staples Vdisposed with their cross portions within said channel and traversing said ybase member and their legs projecting upwardly through said base member to receive and secure a carpet; said cross portions being spaced, at least in part from the surface of said channel whereby adhesive material filling said channel may be forced around and imbed said cross portion; said base member defining a series of sockets between said staples and rupturable webs below said sockets -for receiving and initially supporting securing devices.

4. A vmarginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising; a base member, having a longitudinal channel along its underside.; a series of staples disposed with their cross portions within said channel and traversing said base member and their legs projecting upwardly through said base member to receive and secure a carpet; the protruding portions of said legs having -a vertical portion adjacent said base member and inclined extremities; said base member defining aseries of sockets between said staples and rupturable webs below said sockets for receiving and yinitially supporting securing devices.

5. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, vcomprising: a base strip; a series of staples disposed with their cross portions traversing said base strip and their legs projecting upwardly therethrough; said base strip defining a series of sockets and .rupturable webs thereunder relieved from the surface on which said base strip rests to receive and retain securing devices forced downwardly Vtlfirough said base member prior to driving said securing devices in said underlying surface.

6. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising: a base strip formed of wood, the grain of which extends longitudinally; a series Vof staples disposed vtransversely lof said strip to cinch and reta-in said strip against lateral splitting, said staples projecting above said strip to form' carpet retaining prongs.

7. A marginal fastener stripfor carpets, comprising: a base strip having a longitudinal channel in its undersurface and formed of wood, the grain of which extends longitudinally; a series of staples disposed transversely of said strip to cinch and retain said stripagainst lateral splitting, said staples projecting above said strip to form carpet retaining prongs; the cross portions of said staples being disposed within said channel and spaced from the bottom thereof and said channel adapted to receive adhesive material into which said cross portions imbed and anchor.

8. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising: a base strip formed of wood, the grain of which extends longitudinally; a series of staples disposed transversely of said strip to cinch and retain said strip against lateral splitting, said staples projecting above said strip to form carpet retaining prongs; said base strip defining a series of sockets and rupturable webs thereunder relieved from the surface on which said base strip rests to receive and retain securing devices forced downwardly through said base member prior to driving said securing devices in said underlying surface.

9. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising: a base strip having a longitudinal channel in its undersurface and formed of Wood, the grain of which extends longitudinally; a series of staples disposed transversely of said strip to cinch and retain said strip against lateral splitting, said staples projecting above said strip to form carpet retaining prongs; the cross portions of said staples being disposed within said channel and spaced from the bottom thereof and said channel adapted to receive adhesive material into which said cross portions imbed and anchor; said base member defining a series of sockets between said staples and rupturable Webs below said sockets for receiving and initially supporting securing devices.

10. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising: a base member, having a longitudinal channel along its underside; a series of staples disposed with their cross portions within said channel and traversing said base mmeber and their legs projecting upwardly through said base member to receive and secure a. carpet; said cross portions being spaced, at least in part from the surface of said channel whereby adhesive material lling said channel may be forced around and imbed said cross portion; the protruding portions of said prongs including offset portions defining laterally directed recesses for receiving and retaining the backing of a carpet.

11. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising: a base strip formed of Wood, the grain of which extends longitudinally; a series of staples disposed transversely of said strip to cinch and retain said strip against lateral splitting, said staples projecting above said strip to form carpet retaining prongs; the protruding portions of said prongs including olfset portions defining laterally directed recesses for receiving and retaining the backing of a carpet.

12. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising: a sheet metal channel member; a series of transversely disposed staples; said staples including cross portions spaced from the web of said channel and leg portions secured in the web of said channel and projecting therethrough to form carpet engaging prongs; said channel member adapted to be filled with an adhesive material whereby said cross portions are imbedded and anchored therein.

13. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising: a sheet metal channel member; a series of transversely disposed staples; said staples including cross portions spaced from the web of said channel and leg portions secured in the web of said channel and projecting therethrough to form carpet engaging prongs; said channel member adapted to be lled with an adhesive material whereby said cross portions are imbedded and anchored therein; the portion of said staple within said channelmember shaped to form reinforcing struts to withstand downward forces on said channel tending to distort the web thereof.

14. A marginal fastener strip for carpets, comprising: a sheet metal channel member; a series of transversely disposed staples; said staples including cross portions spaced from the web of said channel and leg portions secured in the web of said channel and projecting therethrough to form carpet engaging prongs; said channel member adapted to be lled with an adhesive material whereby said cross portions are imbedded and anchored therein; said channel member having apertures to receive securing devices, and when filled with adhesive material adapted to retain said securing device in position to be driven into a surface underlying said channel member.

- JESSE C. OWENS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1850696 *Jan 8, 1930Mar 22, 1932William Scott JohnEdging
US2211574 *Jun 20, 1938Aug 13, 1940Mcnieholas Richard TCarpet fastening device
US2238946 *Apr 11, 1938Apr 22, 1941Roberts Roy MCarpet fastener
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2631327 *Apr 27, 1951Mar 17, 1953Roberts CoCarpet anchor
US2654909 *Sep 6, 1950Oct 13, 1953Paterson George MCarpet anchoring strip
US2664589 *Jul 27, 1951Jan 5, 1954Szpilberg Chaim MCarpet gripper
US2731660 *Oct 2, 1952Jan 24, 1956White Joseph MAnchor edge
US2736054 *Oct 2, 1952Feb 28, 1956 Anchor trim
US2806243 *Sep 24, 1954Sep 17, 1957Nikolaus MaexCarpet fastener
US2849747 *May 2, 1956Sep 2, 1958Karas Frank SCarpet anchoring means
US3208095 *Aug 11, 1961Sep 28, 1965Roberts Cons Ind IncCarpet binder bar and replaceable cap
US3353204 *Aug 27, 1965Nov 21, 1967Roberts Cons Ind IncCarpet gripper
US3395420 *Mar 21, 1966Aug 6, 1968Roberts Consoldiated Ind IncTwo-piece carpet gripper and binder
US3908234 *Jan 2, 1974Sep 30, 1975Niedecker HerbertClosure clip
US5500980 *Nov 16, 1993Mar 26, 1996Morrow Associated EnterprisesCarpet strips and methods of making carpet strips and other extruded articles
US6086130 *Mar 20, 1998Jul 11, 2000Chrysler CorporationMethod of installing a carpet member within a motor vehicle
US6708367 *Apr 18, 2001Mar 23, 2004Long Port Investments LimitedFabric gripper
EP1342439A2 *Mar 3, 2003Sep 10, 2003Illinois Tool Works Inc.Carpet strip assembly having staples incorporated therein
Classifications
U.S. Classification16/16, 411/475, 411/920, 411/461
International ClassificationA47G27/04
Cooperative ClassificationA47G27/0462, Y10S411/92
European ClassificationA47G27/04C2T