Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2516286 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 25, 1950
Filing dateAug 6, 1946
Priority dateAug 6, 1946
Publication numberUS 2516286 A, US 2516286A, US-A-2516286, US2516286 A, US2516286A
InventorsRose Yeidel Dorothy
Original AssigneeDavid Walanka, Morris Walanka
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Lamp shade and method of manufacture
US 2516286 A
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

J y 1950 D. R. YEIDEL 2,516,286

LAMP SHADE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Filed Aug. 6, 1946 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVEN TOR.

,4 TTOR NE Y6 July 25, 1950 R, mE 2,516,286

LAMP SHADE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Filed Aug. 6, 1946 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 J INVENTOR. orozb ose e/de BY J4? C9.

.4 TTORNE Y6 July 25, 1950 D. R. YEIDEL LAMP SHADE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Aug. 6, 1946.

INVENTOR. Doro zb z Pose ye/0'2] .4 r TOR/YE n5 July 25, 1950 D. R. YEIDEL LAMP SHADE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Aug. 6,.1946

INVENTOR. IPweJe/c/e/ Patented July 25, 195

LAlWP SHADE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Dorothy Rose Yeidel, Chicago, Ill., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Morris Walanka and David Walanka, both of Chicago, Ill.

Application August 6, 1946, Serial No. 688,679

16 Claims. 1 This invention relates to lamp shades and the construction or manufacture thereof, and particularly it relates to lamp shades of the kind wherein a fabric covering is supported upon a metal frame.

Lamp shades of the general character to which the present invention relates have heretofore been constructed by mounting of suitable textile fabric coverings and decorative ruchings upon a relatively rigid frame that is made from wire, sheet metal or a combination thereof, and while mechanical interlocking means have been proposed for securing the fabric coverings upon such frames, the use of such mechanical interlocking devices has been quite rare because of the difnculty in attaining proper location and tensioning of the fabric upon the frames. Thus it has been customary in the art to attach the fabric coverings to the frame by sewing or needlework and this, requires a relatively high degree of skill as well as the expenditure of considerable time in order to attain the desired degree of perfection in the finished lamp shades. It is therefore an important object of the present invention to enable mechanical interlocking means to be employed in arranging and securing the fabric coverings upon the frame of a lamp shade, and a further and more specific object of the present invention is to enable the sewing operations that are to be utilized in the manufacture of lamp shades to be performed exclusively upon sewing machines thereby to eliminate hand sewing or needlework. Other and related objects of the present invention are to enable fabric covering of a lamp shade to be associated with a frame in such a manner that proper location and tensioning of the fabric upon the frame will be attained, and to enable such a properly means in such a manner that the connection between the supporting cross arms and the upper rim of the frame is neatly and adequately concealed by the fabric covering; to utilize corded seams in a lamp shade in such a manner that the cords of such seams may function in the preliminary positioning of the fabric covering upon the frame; and to employ spaced tensioning elements and anchoring elements on the frame to simplify and facilitate the attainment of a properly stretched and positioned mounting of the fabric covering on the frame.

Other and further objects of the present invention will be apparent from the following description and claims and are illustrated in the accompanying drawings which, by way of illustration show a preferred embodiment and the principle thereof and what I now consider to be the best mode in which I have contemplated applying that principle. Other embodiments of the invention embodying the same or equivalent principle may be used and structural changes may be made as desired by those skilled in the art without departing from the present invention and the purview of the appended claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a front perspective viewof a lamp shade constructed in accordance with the present invention;

tensioned fabric covering to be readily and easily secured in place by mechanical means.

Another object of the present invention is to eliminate hand sewing in the mounting of the fabric covering upon the frame of a lamp shade, and a related object is to enable such a fabric covering to be put in position upon the frame in series of easily performed operations whereby the fabric is first positioned in a preliminary way and is locked in such preliminary position by mechanical interlocking means, and to thereafter stretch and tension the various elements or segments of the fabric covering in such a way that a neat and well finished appearance is imparted to the lamp shade. Further and more specific objects are to enable the inner cover of a lamp shade to be secured in place by interlocking the manner in which the inner cover is Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the frame utilized in constructing such a lamp shade;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged vertical sectional view of one side of the frame shown in Fig. 2

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary plan View of theframe;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary view showing the outer face of the frame in greater detail;

Figs. 6, 7 and 8 are fragmentary vertical sectional views taken through one side of the frame and illustrating successive steps in the mounting of the outer fabric cover on the frame;

Fig. 9 is a cross sectionalview of the welted seam employed in associating the elements of the outer fabric covering;

Fig. 10 is a fragmental elevational View illustrating the outer face of the lamp shade when it is at the stage of assembly shown in Fig. 8

Fig. 11 is a view similar to Fig. 8 and showing put in place on the frame;

Fig. 12 is a fragmentary elevational View of the lamp shade as it is shown in Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a view similar to Fig. 11 and showing the attaching prongs of the frame bent into the final and protected positions;

Fig. 14 is an elevational view showing the structure illustrated in Fig. 13; and

Fig. 15 is a fragmentary view illustrating the manner in which the inner fabric cover is secured in place about the supporting cross arms For purposes of disclosure the invention has been illustrated herein as embodied in a fabric covered lamp shade 28 having an outer fabric cover 2| and an inner fabric cover 22 mounted upon a relatively rigid frame 23 and provided with decorative means along the upper and lower edges of the shade such for example as an upper fabric ruching 24 and a lower fabric ruching 25. The frame 23 is best shown in Figs. 2 to of the drawings and this frame is made of metal-so as to be readily rigid in character. The lamp shade 26 as herein shown is of such a character that the lower and upper edges are circular in form, and where this form is to be employed, the frame has an upper annular anchoring ring 21 and a lowerannular anchoring ring 28 that are held in spaced relation by a plurality of generally vertical struts 29 made from wire and attached at their upper and lower ends to the anchoring rings 2 and 28. The termring as herein used is to be taken as including continuous bands or anchoring frames whether they are circular, oval, rectangular or of other shapes employed in the lamp shade art. As will be evident in Fig. 3 of the drawings, the anchoring rings 2? and 28 are made from sheet metal, and the vertical struts 29 may be secured to the upper and lower anchoring rings 2? and 28 by means such as welding. The anchoring rings 21 and 28 are so formed as to be generally cylindrical in shape. Thus the upper anchoring ring 2'! has a cylindrical wall portion 21W, and the struts 29 are extended upwardly along the inner surface of the cylindrical portion 23W and are secured by welding to the inner surface thereof. The lower anchoring ring 28 is somewhat larger in diameter than the upper anchoring ring 2?, and the struts 29 are therefore curved downwardly and outwardly as willbe evident in 'Figs. 2 and 4 so as to define the approximate shape of the lamp shade as this shape is to be defined by the outer cover 2 I. Thus the struts 29 are extended downwardly fora short distance as at 29U, Fig. 3, from the upper ring TL-and are "then bent slightly outwardly" at 29B, after which the struts are extended downwardly *and curved gradually outwardly to a bend-29C somewhat above the upper'edge of the lower-ring 28. The struts 29 are then extended downwardly'and along the innersurface of a cylindrical portion 28W of the lower ring 28 to which the ends 29L are secured as by welding. Spaced slightly upwardly from the lower ring 28, a tension bar 20 is secured to .the portions 29L as by welding, thereby to define slots 3| between the tension bar 3! and the upper edge of the ring 28, and it will be observedthat the tension bar so is spaced outwardly somewhat from the outer face of the .ring 28 to therebylocate the lower portions outwardly of the ring 28 in such a manner as to facilitate concealment of the securing means that are associated with the ring, as will hereinafter .be described, and this locationof the bar 30 also serves to assure attainment of a tensioning action which willimpart the desired form to the fabric cover 2| when this cover is secured inplacein the manner hereinafter described. Similarly, an upper tension bar 32 is secured to the struts 29 at the bends 29B, thereby .to define slots 33 between the tension bar 32 and the lower edge of the anchoring ring 21, and here again, it should be observed vper ring 21 whereby the shade may be supported in position on a lamp, and such supporting means in the present instance are of the type that is arranged to engage or embrace an electric light bulb so as to support the lamp shade from the light bulb. Thus as will be evident in Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4, a pair of wires 35 are secured at their opposite ends by welding to the inner surface of he wall 21W, and these wires afford cross arms that extend inwardly and downwardly to a ring 36 through which the wires 35 extend, and below the ring :36, the wires '35 are bent downwardly and .theninto a circular form 31. Each wire thus affords a circular portion or loop 31 and these loops may be bent apart so that a light bulb may be inserted therebetween. The loops 3'! then resiliently engage the light bulb to afford the necessary support forethe lamp shade. It will be recognized of course that the specific clamp that is thus afforded by the rings 31 constitutes but one form of lamp shade supporting means, and

1 other forms of supporting means may of course be utilized within the purview of the present invention.

The upper and lower anchoring rings 21 and 28 are provided under the present invention with anchoring means whereby the fabric covers may be mechanically interlocked with these anchoring frames, and as will be evident in Figs. 2, 3, 4 and 5, such anchoring means are afforded by portions of the metal of these anchoring rings. Thus the upper anchoring ring 21 has a plurality of prongs 4K5 struck therefrom at relatively close intervals so as to extend outwardly and downwardly, and these prongs have relatively sharp points so that the fabric covering may be impaled on the prongs to lock the same in association with the ring 21. Similarly, the lower anchoring ring 28 has a plurality of anchoring prongs 4| struck therefrom in spaced relation so as to extend outwardly and upwardly, and here again, the rongs M are arranged to have relatively sharp points to facilitate engagement of the prongs withthe fabric covers as will hereinafter be described.

Asa further aid in assembling the lamp shade, the upper ring 2'! has a plurality of V-shaped openings '43 formed therein so that one such opening is provided immediately above each of the struts 29, and the openings '43 are tapered downwardly as will be evident in Fig. 5, to thereby facilitate an anchoring action as will hereinafter be described. The lower anchoring ring 23 has similar .V-shaped securing or clamping openings 66 formed therein directly beneath the lower ends of the respective struts 29, but the openings 44 are in a reversed position so as to taper upwardly to a sharp point as will be evident in Fig. 5. Along the lower edge of the ring 28, the metal of the ring is ribbed inwardly as at 2BR, thereby to afford a smooth, inwardly .convex surface over which the fabric of the cover may be stretched. Similarly, the upper edge of the ring z'ihas an annular rib 21R formed along its upper edge so as to afford an inwardly convex surface over which'the fabric may be, stretched as will hereinafter be described.

, When an outer fabric cover 2| is to be mounted upon the frame 23 that has just been described, such outer fabric cover 2I is cut and sewn so as to embody the form desired in the finished lamp shade, and under the present invention this is accomplished by cutting the fabric to afford a plurality of panels ZIP, Fig. l, and these panels 2 IP are sewn together along their adjacent edges. In the present embodiment of the invention, the cover M is arranged so as to have a fabric covered cord 2IC secured along each seam 2 IS, Fig. 9. This manner of joining the panels ZIP imparts a finished appearance to the shade and also enables the required sewing operations to be performed by conventional sewing machines. The seam. MS is continued throughout only that portion of the cover 2| that is to be disposed between the upper and lower tensioning bars 32 and 31), and the fabric of the panels ZIP is of such a'length in a vertical sense that upper and lower anchoring tongues 2IU and 2IL are afforded-as continuations of each of the individual panels ZIP, as will be evident in Figs. 6 and 7 of the, drawings. Moreover, the ends of the cords ZICare also free in the spaces between the adjacent anchoring tongues, and these free ends of the cords 2IC and the free ends afforded by the upper and lower anchoring tongues ZIU and 2 IL are utilized in securing the cover 2| in position onthe frame 23. Thus the outer cover 2I, formed as just described, is put in position over the frame '23, and, a preliminary location or positioning of the cover 2! with respect to the frame 23 is attained by securing the upper and lower ends of the cords 2IC to the upper and lower anchoring rings 21 and 28 respectively. Thus the frame 23' of the shade 20 as herein shown has six verticalstruts 23, and the cover 2| hassix panels ZIP, and the panels ZIP are arranged so the corded seams 2! S thereof are disposed opposite the respective struts 29. It will be recognized that in some types the cover 2| may be made of a less number of panels and the cords 2IC may in such an instance be eliminated, and under such an arrangement the tongues 2IU and 2 IL are afforded by suitably cutting the fabric of the cover.

v'After .the cover has been put into position, the upper free ends of the cords 2IC are extended through the openings 43 with which they are aligned, while the lower ends of the cords 25 C are extended through the aligned openings 44 in the lower anchoring ring 28, and the several cords are drawn tightly through the openings in which they are located so as to tension the several cords 'ZIC and locate the fabric cover 2! in the proper vertical relationship with respect to the frame 23. .It will be evident of course that when this tension is applied to the cords 2IC, these cords will be drawn into the pointed ends of the tapered openings 43 and 44, thereby to be locked in place under the desired tension, and to facilitate concealment of the ends of the cords 2IC, these ends are preferably passed outwardly through the openings in the anchoring rings that are afforded by the adjacent prongs iIl or-4I. The ends of the cords 2IC may then be cut off on the outside of the rings 21 and 28, and the remaining portions of the cords will be firmly locked in position when the prongs 4!) and M are bent inwardly in the final assembly operations. as will be hereinafter described.

W he n the outer fabric cover 2| has been 10- 8. cated in its preliminary position through'stretclls ing and anchoring of the cords 2IC, the upper and lower anchoring tongues 2IU and 2 IL may be secured to the frame 23, and in accomplishing this securing operation, the tongues 2IU and 2IL are so related to and associated with the frame 23 that the panels M P will be stretched or tensioned. to the desired form, thereby to impart a neat and finished appearance to the lamp shade. Thus the upper tongues ZIU are extended inwardly over the tensioned bar 32 and through the slots 33 as will be evident in Fig. 7 of the drawings. Similarly, the lower tongues 2IL of the cover '2I are passed inwardly and downwardly beneath the lower tension bar 3i? and through the slots 3| so as to thereby occupy the relationship shown in Fig. '7.

The upper anchoring tongues 2IU are then pulled upwardly and are folded outwardly and downwardly over the rib 271R of the upper anchoring ring, thereby to locate the anchoring tongue 2iU opposite the sharp and downwardly projecting ends of the prongs cc, and the worker,- after attaining the desired position or tension in the fabric, forces the anchoring tongue 2IU inwardly so as to impale the fabric on the prongs 4B. In a similar manner, the lower anchoring tongues 2IL are pulled downwardly over the rib 28R and are then folded outwardly and upwardly so as to be disposed opposite the pointed ends of the prongs AI, and when the desired tension has been attained in the fabric the tongues2IL are forced inwardly so as to impale the fabric thereof on the prongs ii. In, this assembly operation it will be apparent that the adjacent tongues 2IL extend around the portions 29L of the struts '29, Fig. 8, and a similar result is'attained with respect to the upper portions '29U- of the struts as will be evident in Fig. ,8 of the drawings. Thus the several panels '2iP of the outer fabric cover may be readily tensionedso as to attain the desired appearance in the lamp shade, and the work that is involved in thus mounting the cover on the frame may be performed by relatively unskilled workers.

After the outer cover 2I has been put in place on the frame as thus described, the inner cover 22 is put into position, and this inner cover-is preferably formed by sewing two pieces of fabric together along diametrically opposite seams 228, Fig. 15, that stop somewhat short of the upper edge of the inner cover so that relatively wide upper anchoring tongues 2217 are afforded on the inner cover. The inner cover 22 is positioned within the frame 23 so that the upper ends of the seams 228 are disposed immediately beneath the. two cross arms 35 as will be evident in Fig. 15 of the drawings, and the two upwardly extending. tongues 22U of the cover 22 are pulled laterally into an overlapping relationship as shown in Fig. 15 so as to thereby firmly embrace the cross arm 35 and conceal the portions of the upper ring 21 that are located above the cross arms. The upper ends of the anchoring tongues 22U are then pulled upwardly and downwardly over the upper edge of the ring 2! while maintaining this overlapped relation and are impaled upon the prongs 40 in the manner shown in Figs. 11 and 12 of the drawings. The lower end edge of the inner cover 22 is drawn outwardly beneath the lower edge of the lower anchoring ring 28 and is then stretched upwardly to impart the desired tension to the: inner cover 22, and the outer portions of the cover that are disposed opposite the prongs 4| are. impaled upon these rongs. Thus the inner cover filand t he outer cover 21 are secured in properly locatedand tensioned positions on the frame, and the .prongs 40 and 41 may then bebent inwardly to the relationship shown in Fig. 13. The seams 228 are in such an operation located in alignment with certain of the struts 29 and certain of the corded seams 21S, and hence the production of unsymmetrical shadows on the shade is avoided. Preferably the anchored edge portions of the inner and outer covers are then trimmed adjacent the anchoring prongs All and M, and a masking or covering tape 50 is adhesively secured over the cut edges of the covers 21 and Y22 to prevent ravellingand afford a base upon which a decorative border may readily be put in place about the upper and lower edges of the shade. For purposes of disclosure, the decorative border is afforded by the upper ruching 24 and the lower ruching 25, and such ruching as shown in Figs. l3and 14 is secured in position by an adhesive which is applied to the tape 50 and to adjacent inner portions of the ruching, and the ruching is then .put into .position so that the adhesive secures the ruching to the adjacent surface of the shade, thereby to cover and conceal the prongs 40.and4l and the edge portions of the covers that are impaled-along these prongs.

From the foregoing it will be evident that the present invention enables lamp shades to be manufactured by relatively inexperienced workers, and the sewing operations that are involved are of such a character that they may be accomplished'by an ordinary sewing machine. The attachments and positioning of the fabric covers on the frame of the lamp shade made under the present invention may be readily and easily accomplished, and the operations involved are of such a characteras to be adapted for economical'manufacturing procedure.

Thus, while I have illustrated and described a preferred embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that this is capable of variation and modification and I therefore do not wish to be limited to the precise details set forth, but desire to avail myself of such changes and alterations as fall withinthe purview of the following claims.

I claim:

1. The method of producing fabric covered lamp shades upon a frame having spaced upper and lower anchoring rings spaced apart by generally vertical struts and also having lower and upper tension bars disposed in spaced relation above and slightly outwardly of said lower anchoring ring and downwardly and slightly out wardly of-said upper anchoring ring, which consists in forming an outer "fabric cover with a plurality of fabric anchoring tongues extended from both'theupper and lower edges thereof, placing said cover about said frame, passing the upper anchoring tongues inwardly over said'upper tensioning bars and passing said lower anchoring tongues inwardly under said lowertensioning bars, and anchoring said tongues to said anchoring rings with-said cover tensioned between said upper and lower tensioning bars.

2. The method of producing fabric covered lamp shades upon a frame havingspaced upper and lower anchoring rings having upwardly extending prongs on the outer face of said lower anchoring ring and having downwardly extending prongs on the outer face of said upper anchoring ring, and having said anchoring rings spaced apart by generally vertical struts and also having lower and upper tension bars disposed in spaced relation above and slightly outwardly of said low- 8. er ring and downwardly and slightly outwardly-of said upper ring, which consists in forming an outer fabric cover with a plurality of fabric anchoring tongues extended from both the upper and lower edges thereof, placing said cover about said frame, passing the upper anchoring tongues inwardly over said upper tensioning bars and passing said lower anchoring tongues inwardly under said lower tensioning bars, and securing said upper :and lower fabric anchoring tongues respectively to said downwardly and upwardly extending prongs of said anchoring rings with said cover tensioned between said upper and lower tensioning bars.

3. The method of producing fabric covered lamp shades upon a frame having spaced upper and loweranchoring rings spaced apart by generally vertical struts and also having lower and upper tension bars disposed in spaced relation above and slightly outwardly of said lower ring and downwardly and slightly outwardly of said upper ring, which consists in forming an outer fabric cover with a plurality of anchoring tongues extended from both the upper and lower edges thereof, and with anchoring cords extended from opposite ends of the cover between said anchoring tongues, placing said fabric cover about said frame, attaching opposite ends of said anchoring cords to the upper and lower rings with said anchoring cords under tension to position said fabric cover in a preliminary way on said frame, passing the upper anchoring tongues inwardly over said upper tensioning bars and passing said lower anchoring tongues inwardly under said lower tensioning bars, and attaching said anchoring tongues to said anchoring rings with said fabric cover tensioned between said upper and lower tensioning bars.

a 4. The method of producing fabric covered lamp shades which consists in providing a frame having spaced upper and lower anchoring rings spaced apart by generally vertical struts and also having lower and upper tension bars respectively disposed in spaced relation above and slightly outwardly of said lower ring and downwardly and slightly outwardly of said upper anchoring ring, forming an outer fabric cover with a plurality of fabric anchoring tongues extended from both the upper and lower edges thereof, placing said fabric cover-about said frame, securing said fabric cover in a preliminary position on said frame, passing the upper anchoring tongues inwardly over said upper tensioning bars and passing said lower anchoring tongues inwardly under said lower tensioning bars, securing said anchoring tongues tosaid anchoring rings with said fabric cover tensioned between said upper and lower tensioning bars, and securing an inner cover in position on said frame-with the upper and lower edges of said inner cover extending over the upper and lower edges respectively of the upper and lower anchoring rings.

5. The method of producing fabric covered a lamp shades which consists in providing a frame having spaced upper and lower anchoring rings spaced apart by generally vertical struts and also having lower and upper tension bars respectively disposed in spaced relation above and slightly outwardly ofsaid-lower anchoring ring and downwardly and slightly outwardly of said upper anchoring ring, forming an outer fabric cover with a plurality of fabric anchoring tongues extended from both the upper and lower edges thereof, placing said fabric cover about said frame, passing the upper anchoring tongues in.

wardly over said upper tensioning bars and passing said lower anchoring tongues inwardly'under said lower tensioning bars, securing said anchoring tongues to said anchoring rings with said fabric cover tensioned between said upper and lower tensioning bars, securing an inner cover in position on said frame with the upper and lower edges of said inner cover extending over the upper and lower edges respectively of the upper and lower anchoring rings and onto the outer faces of said anchoring rings, and securing decorative means in position about the upper and lower edges of the shade to conceal the extended end edges of said inner cover.

6. The method of producing fabric covered lamp shades which consists in providing a frame having spaced upper and lower anchoring rings having upwardly extending prongs on the outer face of said lower anchoring ring and'having downwardly extending prongs on the outer face of said upper anchoring ring, and having said anchoring rings spaced apart by generally vertical struts and also having lower and upper tension bars respectively disposed in spaced relation above and slightly outwardly of said lower anchoring ring and downwardly and slightly outwardly of said upper anchoring ring, forming an outer fabric cover with a plurality of fabric anchoring tongues extended from both the upper and lower edges thereof, placing said outer fabric cover about said frame, passing the upper anchoring tongues inwardly over said upper tensioning bars and passing said lower anchoring tongues inwardly under said lower tensioning bars, securing said upper and lower fabric anchoring tongues respectively to said downwardly and upwardly extending prongs of said anchoring rings with said outer fabric cover tensioned between said upper and lower tensioning bars, forming an inner fabric cover and positioning the same within said frame, drawing the upper edge of said inner fabric cover outwardly and then downwardly over said upper anchoring ring and securing said upper edge on said downwardly extending prongs of said upper anchoring ring, and drawing the lower edge of said inner fabric cover downwardly, outwardly and then upwardly about said lower anchoring ring and securing said lower edge to said upwardly extending prongs of said lower anchoring ring. c

7. The method of producing fabric covered lamp shades which consists in providing a frame having spaced upper and lower anchoring rings spaced apart by generally vertical struts and also having lower and upper tension bars respectively disposed in spaced relation above and slightly outwardly of said lower ring and downwardly and slightly outwardly of said upper ring, forming an outer fabric cover with a plurality of anchoring tongues extended from both the upper and lower edges thereof, and with anchoring cords extended from opposite ends of the cover between said anchoring tongues, placing said fabric cover about said frame, attaching opposite ends of said anchoring cords to the upper and lower anchoring rings with said anchoring cords under tension to position said cover in a preliminary way on said frame, passing the upper anchoring tongues inwardly over said upper tensioning bars and passing said lower anchoring tongues inwardly under said lower tensioning bars, securing said anchoring tongues to said anchoring rings with said cover tensioned between said upper and lower tensioning bars, securing an inner cover in position on said frame with theupper and lower edges of said inner cover extending over the upper and lower edges respectively of the upper and lower anchoring rings and onto the outer faces of said anchoring rings, and securing decorative means in position about the upper and lower edges of the shade to'conceal the extended end edges of said inner cover.

8. In a lamp shade, a relatively rigid fram comprising upper and lower anchoring rings and generally vertical struts connecting said'rings and holding the same in spaced relation, an upper tension bar mounted on said struts just below and in spaced relation to said upper anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect'to said upper anchoring ring, and a lower tension bar mounted on said struts just above and in spaced relation to said lower anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said lower anchoring ring, a fabric outer cover having upper anchoring tongues at the "upper end thereof which pass over said upper tension bar and extend into positions inside of said upper anchoring ring, said cover also having lower anchoring tongues extended beneath said lower tension bar and through the spaces between said lower tension bar and saidlower anchoring ring, and-means securing said upper and lower anchoring tongues respectively to said upper and lower anchoring bars with the fabric of said cover tensioned between said upper and lower tension bars.

9. In a lamp shade,. a relatively rigid frame comprising upper and lower anchoring rings and generally vertical struts connecting said'rings and holding the same in spaced relation, an upper tension bar mounted'on said struts just below and in spaced relation to said upper anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said upper anchoring ring, and a lower tension bar mounted on said struts just above and in spaced relation to said lower anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said lower anchoring ring, a fabric outer cover having upper anchoring tongues at the upper end there of which pass over said upper tension bar and extend into positions inside of said upper anchoring ring, said cover also having lower anchoring tongues extended beneath said lower tension bar and through the spaces between said lower tension bar and said lower anchoring ring, and anchoring prongs on said upper and lower anchoring bars engaged respectively with-said upper and lower anchoring tongues to tension said fabric outer cover between said upper and lower tension bars.

10.In a lamp shade, a relatively rigid frame comprising upper and lower anchoring rings and generally vertical struts connecting said anchoring rings and holding the same in spaced relation, an upper tension bar mounted on said struts just below and in spaced relation to said upper anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said upper anchoring ring, and a lower tension bar mounted on said struts just above and in spaced relation to said lower anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said lower anchoring ring, a fabric outer cover having longitudinally corded seams with elongated ends free of said cover anchored in tensioned relation between said upper and lower anchoring rings, said outer cover also having upper anchoring tongues at the upper end thereof which pass over said upper tension bar and extend into positions inside of said upper anchoring ring, said cover also having lower anchoring tongues which pass beneath'said lower tension 11 bar and. extend through the spaces betweensaid lower. tensionbar and saidlower anchoring ring, and'means securing'said upper'and lower anchoring tongues respectively to said upper and lower anchoring bars with the fabric of. said cover tensioned between. said upper and lower tension bars.

1 1. In a lamp shade, a relatively rigid frame comprising an upper anchoring ring having a rounded upper edge and a lower anchoring ring having a rounded lower edge and generally vertical struts connecting. said rings and holding the same in spaced relation,v an. upper tension bar mountedon said struts just below and in spaced relation tosaid upper anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said upper anchoring ring, and a lower tension bar mounted on said struts just above and in spaced relation to said lower. anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said lower anchoring ring, a fabric outer cover having upper anchoring tongues at the upper end. thereof which pass over said upper tension bar'and extend into positions inside of said upper anchoring ring, said cover also having lower anchoring tongues which pass beneath said lower tension bar and extend through the spaces betweensaid lower tension bar and said: lower anchoring ring,. said lower. anchoring tongues being firmly. engaged about said rounded lower edge andonto the outer-surface of said lower anchoring ring, and said. upper anchoring tongues being firmly engaged: over the rounded upper anchoring edgeof said upper ringand onto the outer face-of said upper ring, and" means-securing said upper and lower anchoring tongues respectively to the outer. faces" of said upper and lower anchoring rings with. the fabric of said cover tensioned. between; said upper: and lower tensionbars.

12. In a lamp shade;.a relatively rigid frame comprising: an upper. anchoring ring: having: a rounded upper edge and a lower anchoring ring having a rounded: lower edge and generally vertical struts connectingv said rings and holding the same in spaced: relation, an: upper tension bar mounted on said struts just below and in spaced relation to said upper anchoringring'andspaced outwardly with respect to: said upper anchoring ring, and a lower tension bar mounted on said struts just above and in-spacedl relation to said lower anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said lower anchoring ring, a fabric outer cover having upper anchoring tongues at the upper end thereof which pass over said upper tension bar and extend into positions inside of said upper anchoring ring, said cover also havin lower anchoring tongues which pass-beneath said lower tension bar' and extend through the spaces between said lower tension bar andsaid lower anchoring ring, said lower anchoring tongues being firmly engaged about said'rounded lower edge and onto the outersurface of said lower anchoring ring, and saidupper anchoring tongues being firmly engaged over the rounded upper edge of said upper anchoring ring and the outer face'of saidupper anchoring ring, and pointed anchoringv prongs extending outwardly from said anchoring rings and engaging said anchoring tonguestohold said outer fabric cover in'a tensioned relatio between said upper and lower tension bars.

13. In a lamp shade, a relatively rigid frame comprising an upper anchoring ring having a rounded upper edgeand a lower anchoring ring having a rounded lower edge andgenerally vertical struts connecting said rings and holding the. same in spaced relation, an upper tension bar mounted on said struts just below and in spaced relation. to said upper anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said upper anchorin ring, and a lower tension bar mounted on said struts just above and in spaced relation to said lower anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said lower anchoring ring, afabric outer cover having upper anchoring tongues, at the upper end thereof which pass over said upper tension bar and extend into-positions inside of. said upper anchoring ring, said cover also having lower anchoring. tongues which pass beneath said lower tension bar and extend through the spaces between said lower tension bar and said lower anchoring ring, said lower anchoring tongues being firmly engaged about said rounded lower edge and the outer surface of said'lower anchoring ring, and said upper anchoring tongues being firmly engaged over the rounded upper edge of said upper anchoring ring and the outer face of said upper anchoring ring, and an inner fabric cover disposed. within said frame and having its upper and-lower edges respectively folded outwardly about said rounded edges of said upper and lower anchoring rings, and pointed anchoring prongs extending outwardly from said anchoring rings and engaging said anchoring tongues to hold said outer fabric cover in a tensioned relation between said upper and lower tension bars and also to engage said inner fabric cover to tension the same between said rounded upper edge of said upper anchoring ring and said rounded lower edge of said lower anchoring ring.

14. In a lampshade frame; an upper anchoring ring having outwardly and downwardly projecting' anchoring'prongs formed thereon and at spaced intervals thereabout, a lower anchoring ring having outwardly and upwardly extending anchoring prongs formed thereon and at spaced intervals thereabout, a plurality of struts extended between said rings in laterally spaced relation to each other and holding said rings in predetermined spaced relation, an upper tension bar supported on said struts just below and in spaced relation to said upper anchoring ring so as to define slots between said upper ring and said upper anchoring tension bar, and a lower tension bar supported on said struts just above and in spaced relation to said lower anchoring ring so as to define slots between said lower anchoring ring and said lower tension bar.

15. In a lamp shade frame, upper and lower anchoring rings and generally vertical struts connecting said rings and holding the same in spaced relation, an upper tension bar supported just below and in spaced relation to said upper anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said upper anchoring ring, and a lower tension bar supported just above and in spaced relation to said lower anchoring ring and spaced outwardly with respect to said lower anchoring ring.

16. A lamp shade frame having spaced upper and lower anchoring rings having upwardly facing prongs on the outer face of said lower anchoring ring and having downwardly facing prongs on the outer face of said upper anchoring rings, generally vertical struts secured to said anchoring rings and spacing same apart, a lower tension bar disposed in spaced relation above and slightly outwardly of said lower anchoring choring ring.

DOROTHY ROSE YEIDEL.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Name Date Hohenstein Aug. 21, 1894 Number Number 14 Name Date Debs Aug. 3, 1907 Bauwens Sept. 15, 1925 Ober Feb. 28, 1928 Obstler Sept. 29, 1931 Sher Jan. 29, 1935 Johnson Feb. 5, 1935 Sher June 2, 1942 Sher Jan. 18, 1944 Nadler Feb. 15, 1944 Greenberg May 9, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US524825 *Aug 21, 1894 Hugo hohenstein
US862239 *Jul 14, 1906Aug 6, 1907Louis H DebsMolding for lamp-shades.
US1553590 *Sep 5, 1922Sep 15, 1925Seraphine F BauwensLamp-shade construction
US1660883 *Dec 21, 1926Feb 28, 1928Ober LeonardLamp-shade construction
US1825246 *Oct 7, 1930Sep 29, 1931Obstler JacobForm filler
US1989384 *Feb 1, 1934Jan 29, 1935Samuel W SherShade
US1989931 *Jun 15, 1934Feb 5, 1935Walter Johnson OscarShrinkage compensating device
US2285307 *Dec 9, 1939Jun 2, 1942Sher SamuelLamp shade construction
US2339655 *Apr 7, 1941Jan 18, 1944Samuel SherLamp shade
US2341942 *Sep 4, 1942Feb 15, 1944Nadler Rubin CLamp shade
US2348469 *Mar 11, 1941May 9, 1944Sidney RotmanManufacture of lamp shades
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2713632 *Nov 5, 1952Jul 19, 1955Fine Earl YaleLamp shade and method of making
US2765400 *Feb 23, 1951Oct 2, 1956Scherer AdolphMethod of making a lamp shade
US3180982 *Apr 8, 1963Apr 27, 1965Harry GrandCollapsible lamp shade
US4120027 *Mar 14, 1977Oct 10, 1978Stark Mortimer MCollapsible lamp shade having interchangeable configurations
US4215462 *Dec 4, 1978Aug 5, 1980Fernandez Emile CMethod of making a translucent optical diffuser for a lamp
US4979084 *Oct 6, 1989Dec 18, 1990Martin KrauthamerFinial support for table lamp
US6302566 *Jul 21, 1999Oct 16, 2001Richard CohonRemovable lampshade drape
US6793377 *Sep 13, 2002Sep 21, 2004Hak Kee ChuLampshade with reducible package volume
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/357, D26/134, 29/428
International ClassificationF21V1/26, F21V1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF21V1/26
European ClassificationF21V1/26