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Publication numberUS2518724 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1950
Filing dateMar 11, 1947
Priority dateMar 11, 1947
Publication numberUS 2518724 A, US 2518724A, US-A-2518724, US2518724 A, US2518724A
InventorsRunge Richard M
Original AssigneeMiller Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Inbuilt lighting equipment
US 2518724 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 15, 1950 R. M. RUNGE INBUILT LIGHTING EQUIPMENT 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR AlC/MPDMPl/NGE Q WMI/MA ATTORNEY Filed March 11, 1947 Aug. 15, 1950 R. M. RUNGE INBUILT LIGHTING EQUIPMENT 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed March 11. 1947 INVENTOR Hal/n20 M. PUMGE ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 15, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE INBUIL'T LIGHTING EQUIPMENT Richard M. Runge, Meriden, Gonn assignorto The Miller Company, Meriden, Conn a corporation of Connecticut Application March 11, 1947, Serial No. "733,921

13 Claims.

The present invention relates to lighting equipment and is more particularly directed toward fluorescent lighting equipment recessed into permanent ceilings.

Fluorescent lighting equipment for recessed lighting has been designed to have suitable width, usually one foot, and a length which is a multiple of one foot so that it will fit into the space left when a number of tile in conventional tile ceiling are omitted to form an opening of corresponding dimension. Fixtures for such recessed mounting typically have inverted, troughshaped reflectors along the sides of which are vertical stiffening flanges, either extending upwardly from a flange lateral of the reflector proper or extending downwardly to provide a frame about a door or other closure, and end plates spaced apart the nominal length of the fluorescent lamps employed.

While such fixtures are well suited for recessed mounting in tiled ceilings, they are at a disadvantage when one desires to recess them into plastered or other permanent types of ceilings which do not have accurately framed openings. The opening in a plastered or similar ceiling is usually rather irregular, ragged or rough sothat the straight edges of the fixtures cannot fit.

The present invention aims to provide inbuilt lighting equipment for such recessed mounting in plastered or similar ceilings wherein provision is made in the form of reflector-carried finishing strips which can span the gaps between the periphery of the lighting equipment and the edges of the ceiling, opening. These strips are detachable and capable of being used with reflectors suitable for use with the tiled ceiling so that the same style of reflector can be used in either situation. All the strips are carried "by the reflector so that thereflector and strips may be inserted'in place or removed as a unit.

The accompan ing drawings show, for purposes of illustrating the present invention, two embodiments in which the invention may take form, it being understood that the drawings are illustrative of the invention rather than limiting the same.

In these drawings:

Figure 1 is an exploded perspective view showing. a reflector of the multiple lamp type with associated finishing strips;

Figiue 2 is. a perspective view showing the parts assembled;

Figure 3 is a perspective view of the lighting equipment mounted in the ceiling;

Figure 4 is a perspective view at a smaller scale showing the reflector and finishing strips below the ceiling;

Figure 5 is an end view of a lighting fixture with parts broken away and parts in section;

Figure 6 is a fragmentary sectional view on the line -6-6 of Figure 5;

Figure 7 is a perspective view illustrating a lighting fixture of the single lamp type installed in the ceiling, with different forms of finishing strips; 7

Figure .8 is a fragmentary view illustrating the end.- finishing strip and supporting strap 0t Figure 7;

Figures 9 and 10 are fragmentary perspective views illustrating the side flange of the reflector of Figure 7 and.. the side finishing strip, respectively;

Figure 11 is a cross-sectional view on the line Il--H of Figure 7; and

Figure l2. is a cross-sectional view along'the line |2--l:2 of Figure '7.

In the drawings a ceiling is indicated generally by the reference character C. This ceiling may be a plastered ceiling or any other form of ceiling which is provided with an opening large enough to receive the lighting fixture. These fixtures are typically 1 foot wide and several feet long. The opening of the ceiling,'particularly where a plaster ceiling is employed, is likely to be irregular as indicated at C so as to bring about an uneven. and unsightly space between the ceiling and. the straightside edge of the fix-- ture. A similar condition obtains at the end or ends of the fixture.

'In thedrawings, a well known form of fluorescent lighting fixture is illustrated. A wiring channel is shown at H], a hanger of the form shown in the Naysmith Patent 2,291,492, of July 28, 1942, at 10c, .a two-lamp porcelain reflector at H and the endplate of the wiring channel at 12. The sides of this type of reflector have horizontal shelf-like elements l3 and downwardly extending flanges is, and the ends of the reflector are closed by end plates 15 so as to form a rectangular opening suitable for an openmouthed reflector or for the reception of a closure of conventional form, whereby the reflector may be received in the opening in the ceiling.

In the construction shown in Figures l-B, the reflectors fixedly carry hook-shaped members 15 above the shelf-like elements. These members are near the ends of the reflector and maybe spotted along its length. They are out of the way when not in use and are hidden. The longitudinal finishing strips l1 have upwardly extending flanges l8 adapted to enter the hookshaped members l6 and lower flanges l9 which extend out under the ceiling. These strips may be readily inserted in place by tilting them so that the flanges I8 pass under the hook-shaped members. End finishing strips 2! are; {made from angle stock. Tabs 2i are bent down so as to extend over onto the top of strips ll. Prongs 22 are also bent laterally at a spacing such that they may enter under the hook-shaped members [6, as indicated more clearly in Figure 2.

When the side strips l1 and end strips 26 have been secured to the reflector, the members it may be pinched or crimped over the flanges 18 as shown in Figure so that all the strips and reflector may be handled as a unit, which appears as though the reflector had wide side and end flanges as shown in Figure 4. The reflector can be raised up to the wiring channel and secured in place by the usual devices, such as shown in the Donnelly Patent 2,368,810, of February 6, 19 15 for securing the same form of reflector to the wiring channel. The longitudinal strips are of the same length as the reflectors so that they may be used with a number of reflectors carried end to end. The end finishing strips will be used at the extreme ends of the row of fixtures.

Figures 7-12 show a form of construction employed with single lamp recessed fluorescent lighting units with the same wireway l8. Here the reflector BI is made of sheet aluminum and has outwardly extending flanges 32 provided with upwardly extending bent stiflening edges 33. The stiffening edges on the opposite sides of the fixture are usually 1 foot apart. The fixtures are provided with sheet aluminum end plates 34.

'In order to close 01f the space between the side flanges of this fixture, and the permanent ceiling, finishing strips 35 are provided. Each strip is of the same length as the fixture and has a flange 36 doubled on to itself as indicated in the drawings and adapted to fit over the upwardly bent edge 33 of the fixture flange, and may be crimped or pinched together for permanent assembly.

The end plate 34 is provided with a notch as indicated at 3'! somewhat larger than necessary to accommodate the lamp socket 31'. This notch receives a vertical strap 38 having a hooked upper end 39 so that the strap is held in place. The lower end of the strap 38 has laterally bent prongs 40 which maybe passed through holes 4| of an end finishing strip 42 and bent over as indi-' cated, when the parts are installed. The length of this strip 42 is preferably equal to the over all width of the fixture and the two side finishing strips 35. The end finishing strip 32 is supported at the same level as the side finishing strips and in order to maintain the parts in alignment a portion of the material which formed the flange 43 of the end finishing strip, is bent over as indicated so as to fit on to the tops of fixture flanges 32. The reflector is detachably secured to the wireway in any suitable manner.

With the present constructions it is possible to mount a fixture having the usual reflector in a recessed position in a ceiling having an opening somewhat wider and somewhat longer than the fixture and to close off and conceal the gaps or spaces between the sides and ends of the fixture and the ceiling proper. These strips are all carried by the reflector itself so that they can all be assembled together before the reflector is passed up into position and secured to the wiring channel, and can all be lowered for cleaning or refinishing the ceiling surface.

Since it is obvious that the invention may be embodied in other forms and constructions within the scope of the claims, I wish it to be understood that the particular forms shown are but a few of these forms, and various modifications and changes being possible, I do not otherwise limit myself in any way with respect thereto.

What is claimed is:

1. In combination, a lighting fixture having an inverted trough-shaped reflector closed at its ends and supported for downward removal from a fixed support, a fixed ceiling Whose lower surface is at the level of the mouth of the reflector, the ceiling having an opening whose edges are spaced within the side edges and ends of the reflector sufliciently to provide gaps which expose the edges of the ceiling, longitudinaiiy extending and transversely extending gap bridging strips at the sides and ends of the reflector, longitudinally extending hook means interconnecting the sides of the reflector and the longitudinally extending strips, means for detachably supporting the transversely extending strips, which means include inwardly extending bent members carried thereby and slidable over the margin of the reflector, all the strips extending outwardly under the adjacent margins of the ceiling and being closely adjacent the ceiling to conceal the edges of the ceiling when the reflector is in the upper position.

2. The combination of claim 1, wherein the sides of the reflector'have outwardly extending flanges above the level of the ceiling surface and downwardly extending flanges extending to that level, the outwardly extending flanges carry the hook members and the inner edges of the longitudinal strips enter these hook members.

3. The combination of claim 1, wherein the sides of the reflector have outwardly extending flanges above the level of the ceiling surface and downwardly extending flanges extending to that level, the outwardly extending flanges carry the hook members adjacent the ends and the bent members on the transverse finishing strips are in the form of laterally extending prongs slidable under said hook members.

4. The combination of claim 1, wherein the sides of the reflector have outwardl extending flanges above the level of the ceiling surface and downwardly extending flanges extending to that level, the outwardly extending flanges carry the hook members adjacent their ends, the inner edges of the longitudinal strips enter these hook members and the bent members on the transverse finishing strips are in the form of laterally ex tending prongs slidable under said hook members;

5. The combination of claim 1, wherein the sides of the reflector have outwardly extending flanges with upwardly extending edges and the longitudinal finishing strips have the hook-like elements which receive the upwardly extending edges.

6. The combination of claim 1, wherein the transverse strips and reflector ends have separable coupling means accessible only when the reflector is below the ceiling.

7. The combinationpf claim l, wherein the sides of the reflector have outwardly extending flanges with upwardly extending edges, the'lon gitudinal finishing strips have the hook-like ele-' ments which receive the upwardly extending edges, and the reflector ends carry vertical straps to which the transverse finishing strips are secured.

8. A reflector having straight, downwardly extending side flanges, shelf-like elements extending inwardly at the top of the side flanges, downwardly and outwardly facing hook elements carried above the shelf elements and spaced inwardly with respect to the side flanges, and finishing strips fitting about the side flanges and shelf elements and having upwardly extending elements engageable under the hook elements to support the strips in position and outwardly extending flanges at the level of the lower edge of the side flanges, the strips being disengageable by swinging them upwardly to release the hook engageable elements from the hooks.

9. A reflector having straight, downwardly extending side flanges, shelf-like elements extending inwardly at the top of the side flanges, downwardly and outwardly facing hook elements carried above the shelf elements and spaced inwardly with respect to the side flanges, finishing strips fitting about the side flanges and shelf elements and having upwardly extending elements engageable under the hook elements to support the strips in position and outwardly extending flanges at the level of the lower edge of the side flanges, the strips being disengageable by swinging them upwardly to release the hook engageable elements from the hooks, and end finishing strips having prongs slidable under the hook elements carried by the reflector.

10. In combination, a lighting fixture having an inverted trough-shaped reflector provided with side flanges having upwardly extending edges and finishing strips having hook-shaped edges received on the upwardly extending edges of the reflector side flange and adapted to extend under an adjacent ceiling to conceal the open spaces alongside the flanges.

11. A lighting fixture for recessed mounting in a ceiling having a fixture receiving opening, the fixture having an inverted reflecting trough provided with an end plate, a vertically extending strap secured to the end plate, and a horizontal .strip secured to the lower end of the strap and having an outwardly extending flange at the level of the mouth of the reflector for underlying the margin of the ceiling at the end of the opening.

12. A lighting fixture for recessed mounting in a ceiling having a fixture receiving opening, the fixture having an inverted reflecting trough provided with an end plate and longitudinally extending side flanges, a vertically extending strap secured to the end plate, and a horizontal strip secured to the lower end of the strap and having an outwardly extending flange at the level of the mouth of the reflector for underlying the margin of the ceiling at the end of the opening, the strap extending alongside the ends of the flanges and having prongs which engage the tops of the flanges to align the strip.

13. In combination a ceiling with a rectangular opening, a, lighting fixture having an inverted trough shaped rectangular reflector supported for downward removal from a fixed support, the mouth of the reflector being at the same level as the lower surface of the ceiling, the length and width of the reflector being less than the length and width of the ceiling opening so that gaps occur about the periphery of the reflector so that the edges of the ceiling opening are exposed, and means for closing the gaps to conceal the edges of the ceiling opening comprising longitudinal laterally extending strips and transversely extending strips at the sides and ends of the reflector, the strips extending under the adjacent margins of the ceiling and being closely adjacent the ceiling to conceal the edges of the ceiling when the reflector is in position and being separable from the reflector, there being detachable connections along the sides of the reflector and the longitudinal strips including gravity operated interlocks, and inwardly bent members carried by the transversely extending strips which bear on the reflector ends to align the latter mentioned strips.

RICHARD M. RUNGE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,022,222 Sullivan Nov. 26, 1935 2,302,661 Benson Nov. 24, 1942 2,305,015 Langer Dec. 15, 1942. 2,313,131 Elias Mar. 9, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2022222 *Jun 21, 1934Nov 26, 1935Sullivan Marlvan JElectric lighting fixture
US2302661 *Jun 21, 1940Nov 24, 1942Ernest H BensonHinge
US2305015 *Apr 24, 1941Dec 15, 1942Kliegl Bros Universal ElectricAdjustable support for lamp housings
US2313131 *Feb 26, 1941Mar 9, 1943Michael Angelo EliasLighting fixture
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2734127 *Mar 11, 1947Feb 7, 1956 naysmith
US2831962 *Apr 14, 1953Apr 22, 1958Westinghouse Electric CorpLuminaire
US2846569 *Feb 23, 1955Aug 5, 1958Pittsburgh Reflector CompanyRecessed lighting fixture
US2888113 *Sep 23, 1954May 26, 1959Stephen W LindheimCeiling and lighting construction
US2939669 *Oct 29, 1956Jun 7, 1960Miller CoHanger assembly for lighting fixtures
US3058611 *Jun 1, 1959Oct 16, 1962Metalcraft Products Company InFluorescent lighting fixture construction
US3134498 *Jun 18, 1962May 26, 1964Thomas Industries IncTroffer with removable closure and adjusting means
US7111957Jan 12, 2004Sep 26, 2006Genlyte Thomas Group LlcTilt and lock air handling fixture
DE1044973B *Mar 29, 1956Nov 27, 1958Siemens AgLeuchte fuer Leuchtstofflampen zum Einbau in Haengedecken
Classifications
U.S. Classification362/365, 248/27.1, 220/3.4
International ClassificationF21V21/04, F21V21/02
Cooperative ClassificationF21V21/04
European ClassificationF21V21/04