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Publication numberUS2518795 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 15, 1950
Filing dateNov 16, 1946
Priority dateNov 16, 1946
Publication numberUS 2518795 A, US 2518795A, US-A-2518795, US2518795 A, US2518795A
InventorsKnox Granville S
Original AssigneeHydril Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Valve for drill stems and the like
US 2518795 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 15, 1950 y Gs. KNox VALVE FOR DRILL STEMS AND THE LIKE 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Nov. 1e, 1 946 Aug. 15, 1950. G. sfKNox 2,518,795

vALvE FOR DRILL sTEMs AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 16, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 .7.27 V517 ar Erz-anvz'lleik'nax Aug. l5, 1950 G. s. KNox 2,518,795

VALVE FOR DRILL STEMS AND THE LIKE Filed Nov. 16, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 so 8O es /f if J Wf//Z//f fnv-s172101 Q5 Eram/iemmx Patented Aug. l5, 1950 UNITED STATES T OFFICE 2,518,795 VALVEFOR Dam STEMS AND .THM-IKE Granville S. Knox, Los Angeles, ICalif., assignor lto Hydril Corporation, L poration of California This invention relates generally to valves and is more particularly concernedl with controllable back-pressure and/or reverse-circulation valves, irrespective of their environment. However, the valve is particularly useful in connection-*with well drilling and controlling operations, and I have ktherefore described it in that enviroment, without implying that its adaptability and use is thereby limited.

The valve iseskpeciallyuseful in controlling circulation through tubing or through a drill stem, but since it maybe fully described when put to use in 7connection with a drill stem, it will be unnecessary to describe in detail its tubing adaptation. In connection with its use withtubing, i-t is adapted to be selectively operated to control, at the .flower end .of the tubing, the upward flow of .oil from' the -production Zone. When I later describe the operation of the bottom valve to control the upward flow of circulating fluid through a drill stern, it -is obvious-that -this description may be-considered as applicable to the control of upward flow of oil through a tubing, and therefore the `description need not be repeated.

In describing theoperationof `the valve in connection with a drill` stem, I will assume a particularsituation `vwhere so-called reverse-circulation represents the normal condition, but this assumption is made lsolely for purposes of illustration, and is not .to be considered asl limitative on the broader aspects of the invention.

, In reverse-circulation, the circulating fluid fromaround the Voutside of the drill stem enters the stem bore at theY bottom of the string (ordinarily through passagewaysprovided through the cutting tool) and `thence passes upwardly through the `stern bore to the ground surface, where its delivery is vordinarily valve-controlled. In this type of circulation, the upward flow of fluid is caused by pressure in the formation surrounding thawellbore. This pressure is, of course, Muncontrollableifrcm the ground surface. .Accordingly, :if it be desired, for instance, to pull the drill-string from the well (which involves breaking theioints .of Ithe drill `stem .as the stands are removed) it is Aobviously vhighly desirable to shut o lthe :110W of ,circulation fluid into the its-lower or tool end.

.vllt s therefore an object of the invention top lOl/dea Yniyeat lillebottQmofthe string-wherebygsuch a .shutrol may be accomplished at the will of the operator, the valve :being ,controlled remotely trom ethesroundsurface.

ffgienerally, -JL ,provide an hydrau1ic control for 2 Y thisy purpose, utilizing the `fluid in. the pipe bore as .the control medium between Athe kground surface mechanism andthe bottom valve mechanisrn, thus avoiding ythe necessity of providing separate vcontrol `fluid `and special .conductors therefor.

' Under certain well conditions, the operator need merel-y adjust avalve at the ground 'surface to cause movement of the bottom valve from open to closed position. If the bottom valve is to be reopened, there `is then-required the application of downwardly directed fluid pressure (that is, a pressure applied iin the direction opposite to that of the reverse-circulation pressure) through the drill stern. Upon then relieving the uid column of the downward pressure, the bottom valve is relatched in open'po'sition to allow a restoration of reverse circulation.

In most cases, however, each time the bottom valve is to be opened the control includes the ini-tial build-up of the downward pressure and subsequent relief of that pressure, the pulsation thus set up first unlatching the open` bottom valve and then leaving the bottom valve free to go to shut-ofi position. Then, when it becomes desirable or necessary to reopen the bottom valve, a second adjustment of the surface valve and a second pulsation of downwardly directeddiluid pressure causes a reopening and relatchfing of thebottom valve.

Though, in its broader sense, the invention contemplates an arrangement wherein there may be provision for only one closing or one opening cycle ofA operation .during the life of a giveninsytallation, the invention also includes provisions whereby a succession ofidentical surface-valve adjustments ,and downwardly ,directed pressure impulses, Valternately closes and opens the bottom valve, thus making it possible for the operator to,have..full control ofthe bottom valve at all times.

As a special (though not limitative) feature, the arrangement is such ythat during periods when the bottom valveI is in open condition, downward circulation through the stem bore and bottom Valve may-be maintained This hydraulic type of remote control has, of course, many advantages, .as `will be readily understood by those skilled in the art, it being particularly notewor'flll7 that when-the drill string isI-,being ,lengthened or shortened in going into or outof the-hole, (respectively, there is no lneces- 'ly of adding or removing lengths of control rod, as would :be true were the yalve to ibe controlled natisfzot 3 by movement of a sectional stem extending from the valve to the ground surface.

The feature of being able, at will, to shut off upward flow of fluid through a well pipe, with the shutof occurring at the bottom of the pipe, has great significance in connection with certain emergency situations, as well as in normal drilling operations. The emergency may be of an operational charaoter, or it may be a war emergency wherein demand is made that owing wells be shut-off far beneath the ground surface. Heretofore such shut-off has been accomplished by plugs which are depressed through the pipe bore and anchored in position at the lower end of that bore. This is not only a relatively slow, expensive, and often unsure procedure, but, if it be desired later to restore the well to service, the situation is aggravated by the necessity for retrieving the plug or otherwise clearing it from the bore.

In contra-distinction to this, my device permits a, practically instantaneous shut-off at the bottom of the pipe by the mere adjustment of a ground-surface valve or the mere successive application and relief of fluid pressure downwardly through the pipe bore. Then, if the well is to be restored to service, it is only necessary again to adjust the ground-surface valve, or to create a second operative pulsation in the pipe-contained iuid, thus forcing re-opening of the bottom valve. The valve is then again releasably held in its open position and in a state of readiness to be reclosed by actuation of the surface valve or by a pressure pulsation, if and when the occasion arises.

Other features of novelty and objects of the invention will be made apparent in the following detailed description, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, in which,

Fig. 1 is an elevational view showing the position normally Occupied by my device in a drill string;

Fig. la is a view similar to Fig. l except it shows the position occupied ,by the device when it is associated with tubing;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged, medial section, partly in elevation, showing the condition of the valve when it is arranged for circulation upwardly through the bore of the drill stem;

Fig. 3 is a View similar to Fig. 2 showing the condition of the valve during the indexing phase of operation, that is, while the valve has been moved to a position such that its next position must either be full open or full Closed;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. l but showing the valve closed against upward circulation through the drill stem bore;

Fig. 5 is an enlarged, detached elevation of the cam sleeve making up a part of the device;

Fig. 6 is a top plan view of Fig. 5;

Fig. '7 is a developed elevation of the cam sleeve;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged, detached elevation of the valve actuating piston and plunger;

Fig. 9 is a top elevation of Fig. 8

Fig. l0 is a section on line itl-I of Fig. 4;

Fig. ll is a section on line IIe-lI of Fig, 4;

Fig. l2 is a detached, perspective View of a spring pedestal; and

Fig. 13 is a section on the line 3-t3 of Fig. 4.

In Fig. l I have illustrated the preferred location of my improved valve in connection with a drill string II which is made up, in the main, of stands IQ of hollow drill pipe connected by hollow tool joints I2. The drill stem is shown as being positicned within well bore B, defined by formation F, the ground surface being ind dicated at G. The valve I3 is ordinarily, but not necessarily, coupled into the drill string II intermediate the lowest stand of drill pipe and the cutting tool I4, the bore I5 of the drill stem being in communication with bore i6 of valve housing I3, and the housing bore lr6 being in communication with the cutting-tool bore I'I, the latter opening to well-bore B at I8.

At ground surface G, I have schematically indicated a control system made up of pipe I9 leading from stem bore I5 to valve 2l); valve 20 ybeing selectively operable to open pipe I9 to the discharge or outlet 2l or to circulating pump 22.

Fig. la shows the housing I3 of my improved valve as being attached by coupling 23 to the lower end of tubing Ia which is made up of a number of tubing lengths Ila coupled together as at I2a. The schematic arrangement of piping, valve and pump, is the same as described in connection with Fig. 1. For purposes of illustration, it will be assumed that, in Fig, 1 the formation pressure is normally adapted to promote circulation of Well fluid upwardly through opening I8 and the various bores of the valve and drill stem to the piping system at the ground surface, valve 20 normally being set so that delivery of this iiuid is through outlet 2 I, and s0 the pump is ineffective. In Fig. la, it is assumed that formation pressure is causing upward flow of production oil through tubing Illa to the piping system at the ground surface, valve 20 being normally set so that delivery is through outlet pipe 2l and so the pump is ineiective.

It is to be understood, of course, that my improved valve is useful in other operational situations, and therefore the invention is not to be considered as limited by the particular choice made for illustrative purposes. Similarly, the fact that I shall hereinafter describe the detailed operation only in connection with the showing of Fig. l, is not to be considered as limitative on the invention, for the structure and operation may be exactly the same for the tubing-applied valve as for the drill-stem-applied valve. The single difference is, that, in the case of Fig. 1 we are controlling'circulating fluid during well drilling operations, while in connection with the showing of Fig. la, we are controlling the iiow of well fluid during the production stage.

For convenience of assembly, tubular valve housing I3 is made up 0f sections 25 and 26 which are threadably coupled at 21. The upper end of section 25 is internally threaded at 28 for connection to the lowermost drill stem stand l0, while the lower end of housing section 25 is externally threaded at 29 for detachable connection to Cutting tool I4, or to whatever element of the drill string may be positioned below the control valve. Of course, in the case of the tubing of Fig. la, the threaded Zone 29 lmay be omitted.

The bore I6 of the valve housing includes, in housing section 25, a cylinder portion 30 and the upper and lower by-pass chambers 3I and 32, respectively, at opposite ends of the cylinder portion 35. In housing section 26, the bore I6 includes a by-pass chamber 33, a major bore portion 34, and a somewhat reduced diameter bore portion 35, there thus being provided an annular shoulder 36, adapted to support the spring pedestal 31, shown in detail in Figs. 12 and 13. This pedestal is made up of a central body portion 38 from which extend radial Wings 39 adapted to rest on shoulder 36 and to center the pedestal within the bore portion 34. The inner ends afnwings :319 ;,dene a soeket A adapted` to receive and ,centerihe lower end' oispring 4I. which is bottomed. on "body portion 38. The purpose of the siiringiizill be. presently described. 'The openings between wings 39 provide for the-.substanr tiallvunrestricted passage .of fluid through ,the bor-.e portions Bland 3.5.

...Immediately above annular :chamber 33,` .bore l is somewhatrestricted byring 42 upon. which is fashioned 'thegdownwardly facing, annular and conical v.valve.seat 43.. 'The ring .42 is .tbreadably connected at 44 to housing section 2B., :loci-ng serewed home against .the .annular I shoulder 45 of. thothousing section.. The ring isgprovided with diametr-cally .opposite notches 476H see Fig. lm whereby .theringmav bescrewed to and fiom itsrosition of assembly-With .sect-.ion 26 by .theeuso .oa .special Wrench when sections 2.5 and liar-.e-idisoonnsetedone.tromthe other.. :The @reread oi ring 42 vis .chamfei-eol at 41 to oro- Yids aguioward1y-faoiiiestonshouldor fora ournose to. be described.

.I .The yalvostopper,,generally indicated at 48, comprises .a .Circular .hood or. disk 4,9 hav-ingv an annular, conical faceaadapted to'v seal lon complementary seat 1.3.u Thelhead isclamped between shoulder;251i. on valvewsteni 5I aI1d ..the uriner-.end .5217 of the cani sleeve 53, the stern and sleeve'being ltlireadably connected at 5.4 to effectjthisf .ol/ion.`

f '.Sle've '.53 .is'pitovi'dedlwith a bore 55 .adapted to` .recois/,e theifioiir 4ond .of'spri'n'g Y4l which bears'agains't .tire flange 156 of bearing member 51- 1 '.Ths boiiiiioriion ,ss Lof member isi nicely fits the 'upper'e'nd' olffthespringywhile the' upper, conica1`tpf59` 'is' received in v`a complementary recess Si) 'provided in theflower end of stern 5I. The conicalfbeariig between tip 59 .and the end of.'stern"51;centersthe'upperjend of spring '4I and :acts as a Vpivot`=to permitfree relative rotationbetween spring 4I and cam sleeve 53 during certain stages of' operation, namely, vthe rotationaljifndexing yof the vertically reciprocable valve assembly 'to cause it to assume pre-determined positions `withrelation to the valve seat.

Carri sleeve '53 is provided with radial wings 6`I, 'both*at the bottom and near `the top'thereof, W'hichTcenter the Sleeve within bore 34. The space'between/the wings allows lpractically uninterrupted ow of -fluidi-upwardly or downwardly b etvveez-i"fhousingv section 26 and the sleeve.

The outer periphery of sleeve v53 is provided with' a cam s'lot -or groove generally indicated at 52, the particularities of which will be described later. Threadably supported in section 26` andprojecting radially into bore 34 and cam slot S62," are lthe cam lugs or follower pins 63 (see Fig. 11)`.

'Above stem v'5I is arranged a floating dart or plunger generally indicated at 64 `(Figs. 8 and 9) made up of a stem Bearrying near its upper endfa piston vi which'is adapted, at times, to have' piston "fit within cylinder 30, and at other times to loccupy a non-fluid-interrupting position in ley-pass chambers 3I or 32. Piston head BB is reinforced by conical, filler portions 68 eX- teridi'n'g' to stem 65.

` 4The dartor plunger A64 yis provided with radial wings 61, both above Iand below piston head 66, whielii` `center the plunger within bore I5, even during such 'times asy piston S6 occupies by-pass chambers 3`I or 32.v Dart stem 65 is axially aligned w'ith'valve'-stem r5I and iis, at times, adapted to engageftherewith. As will appear, plunger `IilI latf tiiries, vertically -movable independently o-f valvestopper es, atsothertimes is-..adant.d. kvto engage the .stem 5I to :move ksto-opel Mln-downward1y,and, at stil1 otbertimes.y adapted to be thrust upwardly under the impetus of ward movement ofstopper .4.8.

Cam groove 62 .extendseontinuouslv.around sleeve 53,:preforab1y homemade upoi. three .earnmingzonesZ-I,Z2/ and Z-(Fgs, .5J .6 and llwh-ich are identical in ...contour and .therefore adaptemone each, toreceiveiat equivalenti n therealong, A,one of the cam foins .63, ...the -latter being ,spaced 12.0 apart.. Thesthreefgroove zones being identical, it will beneoessary to. escribe only one vin detail... Eaohreroovozono @e .nstance, zone Zlxiincmdes a Vertical los .or A.ooi-irse 69, openings/ith a .nare 1B to .thelower vend :of the sleeve, :the flarebeins pro-.vided only :to ffaeicl tate assembly of the sleeve and earn pins. .since theiinshover pass out throughthe open .ends ofr courses .-ggduring operation` Yof the valve. Above the upperend o.f...oourse 69 motivo-vertical courses 'li and l2 'which are spaced 60 apa-rt, beinelooated dista-ntfirom. .opposite sides of the .center `line of `course .69. L Below .courses .ll and .l2 and spaced ooi-.from .Course 9 and therefore 3 from course 1l, is averlical course 13 which terminates in- .afflatchingFpeclget 1.4, 'The upwardly facing wal-l l5 of` thisnoclset ioims a stopeshouider, as wi11 .-prosently appear..

Leading from theooiirso Tl of @one Z3 to latohing coursel "i3 of. z\one :ZI, ,is an ,inglilidcourse 1.6, the mouth il of course 3,6 lying directly beneath course 7i of A,zone Z13. Leading ,from latch-ing course-,lie and opening to thesde of course 12 oi zone .Zl is .an ,inclined course I8, Leading from @Dorso T512 .of Zone ZI toe-.course 6,9 of zone ZI, is aninclined course 1.9, the mouth .'80 of the latter .Course vbeing disposed direotly beneathcourse ,1.2. Aninclined course 8| leads from .course .59 yof zoneZI tocouise jI I of zone ZI, themouth B2 of course .8l ,openingdirectly over course .65er .ZoneZi VInclir-ied course i6 ofrione Zei .opens .,tolatching cou-rse 7,3 of .zone Z2..

'Now referring to Fig. 2, the valve is .show-n .in the condition prevailing during reverse .eiroi11a tion, which is herecoiisidered vas. `norr'nal cireiilation. Aflhat is, the circulating fluid -is flowing upwardly through the-drill stem. Cainpins .63 are in latching pockets lId `(positions .A `of Fig. '1) shoulders 7.5 engaging theipi-ns vto limi-t upward movement of sleeya vunder the, .influence of spring IiI, kwhich .constantly is compressed in xa manner tending to bias valve stopper e@ to closed lpositionagainst .se.'.i;1'.,43.kk With pins i3 thus ;lfi olding ;sleeve.5,3 ats-.relatively depressed position, valve stopper 4,8 :held .spaced below seat 4,3,..the valve `thusloeilfrlg maintained in open condition to perni-it theyupward flow ofY fluid, as indicated by the arrows.

Atthistirnethe kinetic energ y.,of the upwardly ilowing uid acts..,ag,ainst the, under side of Iplunger or .dart 6,4 -to `hold .-it its uppermost position ,(fulleline position) the engagement of the, upper ^ends 30 of wings GTI .with housing shoulder Slalimitingthe upward movement of the dart. Piston head 66 now* lies i-n -by-pass chamber ..3I, so .there iSample space y,for the upwardly ilowing fluid to passanound head v6,6 and thence flow upwardly .through vtlf1 e-.drill stern.

If it now be .desiredftoclose valve 48-..-Il;? .the operator rst A closes :valve :2B `which is downstream with relation tovalve-d-sl. 11j-he fluid column .within. .the drill :stem and valve housing L3 .thereupon becomes, statig and .dart si!! drops t0thd9ltedf liIlQiDQStQo of .Fia dief-dart coming to rest when it engages the upper end of valve stem at which time piston head 66 lies within the cylinder portion 30 of the housing bore.

Pump 22 is then actuated to build up the fluid pressure above head 66, forcing the latter downwardly through cylinder 30. The consequent depression of dart 64 acts through stem 5| to depress valve head 48 and sleeve 53 against the force of spring 4|. During the initial portion of the depressive movement, cam pins 63, in effect, leave pockets 14, traveling through courses 13. The inclinations of courses 18 then cause a 30 rotation of the cam sleeve through the engagement of cam faces 18 with -pins 63, whereupon continued depression of the sleeve causes, in effect, pins 63 to pass upwardly into vertical courses 12 (Fig. 3).

The downward movement of the sleeve continues until ends 9| of dart-wings 61 engage ring-shoulder 41. Cam pins 63 are now in positions B of Fig. '7. By this time piston head 66 has entered by-pass chamber 32, so downward circulation may be promoted and maintained through the entire length of valve housing |3 (see arrows in Fig. 3). l When the operator subsequently relieves the fluid pressure from above, spring 4| acts to urge sleeve 53 and valve stopper 48 upwardly. Pins 63 first pass through vertical courses 12 and then through inclined courses 19 into vertical courses 69; the passage through the inclined courses rotating the cam stem 53 through 30 due to the engagement of cam faces 19 with pins 63. With the cam pins in courses 69, spring 4| is free to urge valve stopper 48 to fully seated or closed condition (Fig. 4) all upward circulation being thereby shut off. Of course, the upward pressure of the well iiuid acts against the under side of the cam sleeve and stopper 48 in a manner tending to seat the valve stopper more rmly. At this time the piston head 66 lies in cylinder 30 near its upper end, and pins 63 are at positions C in Fig. 1.

If, now, the operator wishes to return the valve to latched-open position (Fig. 2) he first applies downwardly directed fluid pressure to head 66, the pressure being suflicient to overpower spring 4|. As sleeve 53 is pressed downwardly, pins 63 first pass through vertical courses 69 and then through inclined courses 8| into vertical courses 1|; the sleeve being rotated 30 due to the engagement of pin 63 with the cam faces 8| of inclined courses 8|. All parts of the device are thus returned to the condition of Fig. 3, except that pins 63 lie in courses 1| instead of 1'2. They occupy positions D in Fig. '1.

When the operator subsequently relieves head 66 from downwardly directed fluid pressure, spring 4| acts to lift the sleeve, causing pins 63 iirst to travel through vertical courses 1| and then through inclined courses 16 into vertical courses 13; the passage of the pins through the inclined courses giving a 30 rotation to the valve stern due to the engagement of cam faces 16' with pin 63. Pins 63 thus find their way into latching pockets 14 and, once more the device is returned to the condition of Fig. 2, with valve 48 latched open and dart 64 movable upwardly to allow reverse circulation.

Thus, by alternately applying downwardly directed fluid pressure and then relieving that pressure, the shut-off valve 48 is caused to be moved alternately from latched-open condition to closed condition, and vice-versa. The stepby-stepindexingV of the valve to bring about this sequential action may be considered as being accomplished under remote control by successive fluid-pressure pulsations sent down through the drill stem fluid.

It will be seen that, by following the above procedure, an operator may easily and almost instantly close or open uid flow through a valve located clear at the bottom of a well pipe, whether it be drill stem or tubing, all to the advantageous ends spoken of at the forepart of this specication.

In some wells the formation pressure is of such high and reven value that it is feasible to omit spring 4| from the valve assembly, provided the operator does not object to-or other operational demands do not preclude-the movement of an open bottom valve to closed position the instant the surface valve is opened and then closed. In this case, dependence is had solely on the kinetic energy of the upwardly flowing fluid to urge valve stopper 48 and sleeve 53 upwardly in all phases of the operation described above wherein the spring has been specified as the source of the urging force.

With the spring omitted, the need for dart 64 ceases and therefore this element, also, may be omitted under the conditions speciiied just above. Then, assuming the valve is being held open by virtue of engagement of cam pins 63 with shoulders 15, if occasion arises for closing the bottom valve, the operator merely closes surface valve 20. The fluid column becomes static and the stopper 48 and sleeve 53 drop by gravity to cause a 30 indexing of sleeve 53 so, when valve 28 is reopened, the kinetic energy of the now moving fluid column elevatesl the valve stopper to shut-oir position, there being a 30. indexing of the sleeve during its upward movement.

If the bottom value is to be 1re-opened, it is first necessary to unseat stopper 48 by closing valve 20 and then creating preponderant downwardly directed luid pressure by operation of pump 2|. Once the bottom value is cracked open, stopper 48 will drop by gravity to the position of Fig. 3, the sleeve 53 being indexed through 30. Upon stopping pump operation and reopening surface valve 26, the kinetic energy of the upwardly flowing well-fluid elevates stopper 48; sleeve 53 being indexed through an additional 30. It follows that stopper 48 is releasably held open in the position of Fig. 2, and reverse-circulation is restored.

While I have shown and described preferred embodiments of my invention, various changesin design, structure and arrangement may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of my broader claims.

I claim:

l. In a device of the character described, a vertically arranged valve housing having a bore therethrough, a valve within the housing and including a downwardly facing valve seat and a valve stopper in the bore below the seat and movable vertically through the bore to and from the seat for respectively closing and opening the valve, an extension carried by the stopper and rotatable with respect to the housing, a stop member carried by thefhousing, an upwardly facing stop shoulder on said extension and vertically alined and engaged with said stop member when the housing and extension have been relatively rotated to one position of angular relationship and when the valve stopper is vertically spaced beiow'tnelseat, sie streamer aed'stepmeoie ber; when? so engaged,- liold J 'said stopper againstupward vertical Jeevene 'and .an ub-4 wardly extendinga damit "een arten sion aboveA and engage able 'wit u tne/stopniernber when-'the stopper is subsequently vertic'aily def pressed; said. carri tace being directive," during suoli depression, toi rotate thefexterision. with. relationto the housing and therebyvertically dis-l aline' the stop member; andlstopf shoulder, where` by,upon irelieiof depressive force, thestopperis movable vertically upwardly into engagement with thezvalveseat. l Y

2. In. a device' oitlrecharacterdescribed, a vertically arranged valve housingl havinga, bore therethrough', a valve withirirthe housinganfd'f: in''- clu'ding a' downwardlyfacingvahfef seatanda valve 'stopper in the' b'orel below the seat an'dmovable vertically' through vthebore' toL and from;the seat Vfor respectivelyfelosing sind` opening.; .the valve, an extension carried,by;tlreflstopper`l and rotatable withv .respect tor. the housing, .a-.lstop member .carried ,by'theihousing anupwardly faeing stop shoulde'roii saidlextension and vertically aline'd: andengaged-` withsaid stop member-,when the. housing and 4extension have `beenrelatively rotatedv td'l onezposition ,of .angularfrelationship and whenrthe-valve stopperjisvertically spaced below the seat, said stopgshoulder and'stop-mein-I bei;` when S05/engaged', holdingsaild stopper against upwardvertical movement, an upward-ly extending', `angular cam face'4 onI theA Aextemsion above and' engageable withv thestop'inember whenltheistopper is ,subsequently vertically deer pressed, 'said cam face,beingeffective, during such, depression, to rotatein,Y a given direction, the extension with vrelation1t,o` the; housing; and. thereby verticallyV disfaiine the stop-member` and stop shoulder, whereby, 'upon relief; .of depressive forca,v the ,stopper is moyablef vertically' upward into: engagement-.with thel Valvezseat, afsecnd` angular cam shoulder onthe: extensionaandalined with the? said stop memberY whenuthe, ,valve `is closed and effective',l whenthestopper is: subsequentlydepr'essed, ,to further' rotate the extension in said given direction with relationtothe. hous ing, and; a third angular Cam shoulder on theexfr tension and alined with said stop-member `after thestopper has been. so. depressedand eiectivef upon subsequent upward movement of thestopf per, to rotate-,the extension in `a manner to veri-. tically alineisaid stop shoulderwith astop-mem.- ber ,ongv theehousing which stop ,memberv is adapted to halt. subsequent-upward movementofvthe stopper beforeeit reachessaid;seat!y p.

3.V In adevice of the charactergdesoribed, va ver-, tically arranged valve housing,l Ihaving ,aj bore therethrough, a ,valvegwithin the housing and including a downwardly facing valve seat and a valve stopper inthe bore below tlfi'e'-` seat and movable vertically through the looreto andfromthe seat for 'respectively closing and opening the valve, an extension carried by the stopper andA rotatable withirespectfto'the housing`,"a"stop member carried by the housing, an upwardly fac-ing stop; shoulder on said extensiongand vertically alinedandgengaged with sai'dzstopinember when the" housing: ,andXtenSQn 'have-alleen relaiirly rotated t0 .9r.1eROS,itiQs @fer-.leider relationship and when the valve stopper is vertically spaced below the seat, said stop shoulder and stop member, when so engaged, holding said stopper against upward vertical movement, an upwardly extending, angular cam face on the extension above and engageable with the stop member when the stopper is subsequently vertically def,

pressedfsaid cam face being effective, during. such depression, torotate, in a given direction, the extension with relation to the housing and thereby vertically dis-aline the stop member and stop' shoulder, whereby upon re'lief'of depressive force`-,the stopper isrno'vable vertically upwardl into engagement with the valve seat', a second stop member on the housing and in the transverse plane of. and angul'arly displaced from the first stopmember, a second angular cam shoul-V der on the extension 'andV aline'd with the first stop member-when the. valveis Closed and effective, when the stopper is subsequently depressed, to further rotate the extension in said given direction. witnrel'ationrt'o the housing; and a third angular cam shoulder onthe extension and alined with the rst stop member after thev stopper has beenso depressed and effective, upon subsequent upward' movement'oi the stopper to further rotate the extension in said given. direction. to an extent vertically alining said stop shoulder with said sec'ondstop member.

41. In adevice of the character described, a vertically arranged valve housing having a bore therethrough, a valve within the housing and including a` downwardly facing valve seat and a valve stopper in the bore'. below the seat and movable vertically through ther bore to and from the' seat for respectively closing and opening vthe valvega spring'japplied between the' housing and f. ticallyrspaoed below the seat, saidV stop shoulder` andstop'v member, when so engaged, holdingsaid st'opperagainst upward vertical movement, and an upwardly extending,` angular cam faceon the extension above and engageable withu the stop member when the stopper is subsequently vertically depressed, said cam face being efrect-ive', during such depression, to rotate the extension' with relation to the housing and thereby vertically disealinethe stop member and stop shoiilden' whereby, upon relief of depressive forceg'the stopper is movable vertically upward intov engagement with the valve seat, a plunger movable 'vertically through the housing bore above "the valve'seat, means on the housing limiting upwardY movement of the plunger, said plunger, at its upward limit of movement, being spaced 4'verticallyf'from the stopper, and said plunger being movableA downwardly to engage the stopper in a'manner wherebyk subsequent `de,- press'ionof the plunger depresses the stopper, andf apistjon on said plunger and havingwpist'on t with the housing bore when the plunger is between its'v limits of vertical movement,A there being a, pairvoflby-passages in the housing ,around the piston v,which'are positione''l to be effective, onehwhbnlthe plunger is at its upper limit of movement and kthev other when the Stopper has been depressed by' the plunger to a predetermined extent.

5. In a device of the character described, a vertically arranged valve housing having a bore therethrough, a valve within the housing and including a downwardly facing valve seat and a valve stopper in the bore below the seat and f. niovagble vertically through the bore to and from the seat for respectively closing and opening the valve, a spring applied between the housing and stopper and urging said stopper -towards said seat, an extension carried by the stopper and rotatable with respect to the housing, a stop member carried by the housing, an upwardly facing stop shoulder on said extension and vertically alined and engaged with said stop member when the housing and extension have been relatively rotated to one position of angular relationship and when the valve stopper is vertically spaced below the seat, said stop shoulder and stop member, when so engaged, holding said stopper'against upward vertical movement, an upwardly extending, angular cam face on the extension above and engageable with the stop member` when the stopper is subsequently vertically depressed, said cam face being effective, during such depression, to rotate, in a given direction', the extension with relation to the housing and thereby vertically dis-aline the stop member and stop shoulder, whereby, upon relief of depressive force, the stopper is movable vertically upward into engagement with the valve seat, a second stop vmember on the housing and in the transverse plane of and angularly displaced from the first stop member, a second angular cam shoulderon the extension and alined with the first stop member when the valve is closed and effective, when the stopper is subsequently depressed, to further rotate the extension in said given direction withrelation to the housing, and a third angular cam shoulder on the extension and alined with the first stop member after the stopper has been so depressed and effective, upon subsequent upward movement of the stopper, to further rotate the extension in said given direction to an extent vertically alining said stop shoulder with said second stop member, a plunger movable vertically through the housing bore above the valve seat, means on the housing limiting upward movement of the plunger, said plunger, at its upward limit of movement, being spaced vertically from the stopper, and said plunger being movable downwardly to engage the stopper in a manner whereby subsequent depression of the plunger depresses the stopper, and a piston on said plunger and having a piston fitwith'the'housing bore when the plunger is between its limits of vertical movement, there being a pair of by-passages in the housing around the piston whichare positioned to be effective, one when'the plunger is at its upper limit of movement and the other when the stopper has been depressed by the plunger to a predetermined extent.

6. Ina device of the character described, a vertically arranged valve housing having a bore therethrough, a valve within the housing and including a downwardly facing valve seat and a valve stopper in thev bore below the seat and movable vertically through the bore to and from the seat for respectively closing and opening the valve, an lextension carried by the stopper and rotatable with respectto the housing, said ex-` tension being in the form of an axial sleeve depending from the stopper, a helical compression spring within the sleeve bore and interposed between a downwardly facing shoulder on the stopper and an upwardly facing shoulder on the housing whereby the spring urges the stopper towards said seat, a stop member carried by the housing, an upwardly facing stop shoulder on said sleeve and vertically alined and engaged with said stop member when the housing and extension have been relatively rotated to one position of angular relationship and when the valve stopper is vertically spaced below the seat, said stop shoulder and stop member, when so engaged, holding said stopper against upward vertical movement, and an upwardly extending, angular cam face on the sleeve above and engageable with the stop member when the stopper is subsequently vertically depressed, said cam face being effective, during such depression, to rotate the extension with relation to the housing and thereby vertically dis-aline the stop member and stop shoulder, whereby, upon relief of depressive force, the stopper is movable vertically upward into engagement with the valve seat.

7. In a device of the character described, a vertically arranged valve housing having a bore therethrough, a valve within the housing and including'a downwardly facing valve seat and a valve stopper in the bore below the seat and movable vertically through the bore to and from the seat for respectively closing and opening the valve, an extension carried by the stopper and rotatable with respect to the housing, said extension being in the form of an axial sleeve depending from the stopper, a helical compression spring within the sleeve bore, a rotational bearing between the upper end of the spring and a downwardly facing shoulder on the stopper, the lower end of the spring engaging an upwardly facing shoulder on the housing, all in a manner whereby the spring urges the stopper towards said seat, a stop member carried by the housing, an upwardly facing stop shoulder on said sleeve and vertically alined and engaged with said stop member when the housing and extension have been relatively rotated to one position of angular relationship and when the valve stopper is vertically spaced below the seat, said stop shoulder and stop member, when so engaged, holding said stopper against upward vertical movement, and an upwardly extending, angular cam face on the sleeve above and engageable with the stop member when the stopper is subsequently vertically depressed, said cam face being effective, during such depression, to rotate the extension with relation to the housing and thereby vertically disaline the stop member and stop shoulder, whereby, upon relief of depressive force, the stopper is movable vertically upward into engagement with the valve seat.

GRANVILLE S. KNOX.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 2,033,563 Wells Mar. 10, 1936 2,071,392 Crowell Feb. 23, 1937 2,312,018 Beckman Feb. 23, 1943 2,351,322 Crake June 13, 1944

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3157233 *Jun 20, 1956Nov 17, 1964Otis Eng CoApparatus for controlling flow within a well
US3837403 *Jan 3, 1972Sep 24, 1974Hydril CoAlternating valve method and apparatus
US4403659 *Apr 13, 1981Sep 13, 1983Schlumberger Technology CorporationPressure controlled reversing valve
US4552219 *Oct 5, 1983Nov 12, 1985Hydril CompanySubsurface safety valve
US5348087 *Aug 24, 1992Sep 20, 1994Halliburton CompanyFull bore lock system
EP0063519A2 *Apr 9, 1982Oct 27, 1982Schlumberger Technology CorporationPressure controlled reversing valve
EP0068985A2 *Jun 18, 1982Jan 5, 1983Schlumberger Technology CorporationAnnulus pressure controlled reversing valve
EP0231694A1 *Dec 16, 1986Aug 12, 1987Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethods and apparatus for selectively controlling fluid communication between a pipe string and a well bore annulus
WO1986002124A1 *Oct 2, 1985Apr 10, 1986Diamant Boart Société AnonymeDevice for controlling the locking of a sampling tube
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/540, 166/239, 166/237, 166/331
International ClassificationE21B21/10, E21B21/00, E21B23/00
Cooperative ClassificationE21B23/006, E21B21/10
European ClassificationE21B21/10, E21B23/00M2