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Publication numberUS2519335 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 22, 1950
Filing dateAug 26, 1946
Priority dateAug 26, 1946
Publication numberUS 2519335 A, US 2519335A, US-A-2519335, US2519335 A, US2519335A
InventorsFilliung Oscar C, Mck Ballou John
Original AssigneeKirk Rich Dial Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Offset printing device
US 2519335 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

22, 1950 J. MCK. BALLOU ETAL 2,519,335

OFFSET PRINTING DEVICE Filed Aug. 26, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 A TTORNE Y 22, 1950 J. M K. BALLOU EIAL 2,519,

OFFSET PRINTING DEVICE v Filed Aug. 26, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 28 a4 82 o a 16 Patented Aug. 22, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE liung, Los Angeles, Calif., assigrior's to Kirk Rich Dial Corps, 'Los Angeles, Calif a cor-petation of California Application August '26, 1946, Serial No. 693,088

7 Claims. 1

This invention relates to offset printing and deals more particularly with a machine 'for print= ing'watch dials and the-like.

The primary Object of the present invention is to provide a simple relatively inexpensive 'yet accurate machine for printin the faces of watch dials either in their entirety or to add thereon imprints "such as names, trade marks and other indicia.

Another object of the invention is to provide novel means for registering the onset printing positions of both a printing plate-and a dial for receiving an imprint therefrom whereby an ac curate printing operation is quickly and easily performed.

Another object of the invention is to provide novel mounting and holding means for the'printing plate and the Watch dial and to embody effective means whereby said plate and dial are accurately relatively registered by adjusting said means for accurate printing of the latter by transfer of ink from the former.

A further objectof the invention is to 'pro vide a novel support for the dial and a similar support for the printing plate and to provide means for adjusting said supports from approx-- im'ate to accurately registered relative positions.

A further object of the invention is to rovide a Watch dial printer as indicated embodying a horizontally and angularlyadjustable bed which mounts the printing plate and dial and further includes a vertically recipr'ocative tympan for effecting transfer of ink from the printing plate to the dial.

A still further object of the invention is to provide detent means for the mentioned bed releas'able upon reverse manual movementof the means employed forope'ratively moving the tympan.

Our invention also has for its objects to'provide such means that are positive in operation, convenient in use, easily installed in a working position and easily disconnected therefrom, eco nomical of manufacture, relatively simple, and of general superiority and serviceability.

The invention also comprises novel details of construction and novel combinations and arrangements of parts, which will more fully appear 'in the course of the following description. However, the drawings merely how and thefollowing description merely describes one embodiment of the present invention, which is given by I way of illustration or example only.

In the drawings, like reference characters designate similar parts in the several views.

2 Fig. 1 is a top plan view or a watch dial rinter according to the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a vertical 'sectional'view as 'takenon thejlin'e 2:2 of Fig. 1. V

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary side elevational view of the upper portion of the printer.

"Fig. 4 is a plan sectional view-astaken onii'ne 4=-=4 of Fig. 2, the "horizontally sWihgable-b'd being shown in another position.

Fi 5 is a tr kensectienai view as takn'ofi;

line 5 5 ofFig. 1. g 4

Fig. 6 is a similar sectional view-taken through the'center Of th'dial mounting means shown ill Fi 5.

Fig. 7 isa broken plan view as when ("iii-line "Fig. 8 is a broken plan view "of the printing late mounting mean I Fig. 9 is a side viewthereo f.

Fig. 10 is all enlarged clo'ss 's'eo'tidhal view as taken on line l0=-=l 0 of Fig. '5.

Fig. 1 1 is a fragmentary and enlarged vertical sectional detail View bf the printing plate filbllflll' ing' means.

Fig. 12 is an enlarged broken sectional viewas taken onl'ir e l2--|'2 o'f1iig. 3, p w y W The machine which is illustrated is intended primarily as a watch dial "printer although rintingor other articles may e accomplished thereby. In its resent form, the printer corn prises, generally, a base it, a standard ost is mounted vertically thereon, a horizontally and radially adjustable bed I? adjacent to the base [5, anti-friction means is mounting said heater movement n the pest it, printing plate mount -j ing means i9 and watch dial mounting means 20 on the bed :1, a head 2| carried by'th'e' per end of the post it, vertically reei roeativei means '22 carried by the head for movement toposition, means 26 coupled with the handlemeans 24 for releasing the-detent ineahs 25; a

guide member 27 for said means 25,- and a Vertically adjustable reticle means 2a carried by the member 2"! and associated, se1e'ctive1y',-with' the means 19 and 20 to provide Visual aid iii accurately positioning th printing plate 1? and watch dial D mounted on said means lfi 'an'd'ifin respectively.

The base 15 is a generally rectangular piste 29 formed with a boss-Mior receiving the lower-- a 3 reduced end 3| of the standard p'ost I6 and with suitably disposed bosses 32 whereby the base may be secured on a support.

The means I8 is mounted on said reduced end 3| of the post I6 and comprises a pair of antifriction bearings 33, one against the boss 30 of the base and one against the shoulder 34 formed by the reduced end 3|. A spacer 35 is provided between the bearings 33, and a nut 36, on the under side of the base, serves to lock the post rigidly on the base by drawing the shoulder 34 down on the upper portion of the bearings 33. The inner races of the bearings 33 are thus held against rotation, leaving the outer races free to revolve. The bed I1 is mounted on said outer races and thus may be horizontally moved about the post I6.

The bed I1 is formed as a casting of generally triangular form. Said bed has a boss 31 at one apex for the bearings 33, a circula opening 38 at another apex, and a generally oval opening 39 at the third apex. The openings 38 and 39 are of such size as to permit relative adjustment of the respective mounting means I9 and 29 with the center of the post I 6 and with each other.

The means I9 comprises a block 49 on the bed, a stem 4| on the block extending through the oval opening 39, and a plate 42 fixed on the stem by a nut 43 and against the under face of the bed. The stem 4| is of such length with relation to the thickness of the bed as to permit movement of the block 49 along the upper face of the bed as limited by the opening 39. A pair of spring-urged pins 44, carried by the bed, are arranged to press downward on the upper face of plate 42 and thereby create a friction between the block 49 and bed ll of sufficient magnitude to fix the block against movement. A fork 45, having its tines 4B apertured for the pins 44, is bent to provide a fulcrum 41 which acts on a plate 48 that is fixed to and forms part of the bed. Said fork is provided with a handle 49 extending through a radial slot 59 in said bed. The plate 48 is formed with a similar projecting handle By grasping the handles 49 and 5| and depressing the former, the fork 45 is tilted on its fulcrum 41 to cause lifting of the pins 44. Since the mentioned friction between the block 49 and bed I1 is now eased, the block may be readily shifted as limited by the opening 39. Upon release of the handles 49 and 5|, the mentioned friction becomes effective to lock the block 40 in adjusted position. Suitable undercut pins 9| are provided on the upper face of block 49 to locate plate P thereon. A spring-tensioned lever 92, pivoted on the block, is so associated with said pins that the same engages an edge of plate P to press said plate into firm engagement with the pins.

The means is substantially similar to the means I9, and the parts thereof, therefore being given similar reference numbers. The only differences in the structures are the openings 39 and 3B and the blocks 40 and 52 for the means I9 and 29, respectively.

The block 49 is designed to receive and hold the printing plate P which is generally larger than a Watch dial and frequently bears several intaglio engravings for selective use. Accordingly, the oval opening 39 permits of a greater range of adjustment of block 49, so that a selected engraving may be properly placed in registered position. The block 52 is generally cup-shaped and is filled with a quantity of beeswax 53 in 4 which a watch dial D is adapted to be embedded as best seen in Figs. 4 and 5.

The head 2| comprises a casting 54 mounted by clamp bolts 55 on the upper portion of the standard post I6. The casting extends radially and may be locked in any desired position with respect to the base I5. The outer end of the head carries a spaced pair of rollers 56 which preferably are anti-friction bearings arranged to guide the vertical movement of the reciprocative means 22. The latter means consists of a bar 51 formed with longitudinal grooves 58 in which the rollers 56 are engaged. Mounted in this manner, the bar 51 is movable, with a minimum lateral play, toward and from the bed H. A bottom plate 59 on the bar forms a stop to limit the upward movement thereof and a top plate 60 serves to limit the downward movement of said bar with respect to the head 2 I. A tension spring 6| normally holds the bar 51 in elevated position with the stop 59 against the lower face of the head. The tympan 23 extends downwardly from the bar 5! and comprises a gelatinous mass capable of receiving ink from the intaglio engravings in the plate P and imprinting the same on the dial D.

The handle means 24 comprises a handle 62 on a bail or yoke 63 mounted on pivot screws 64 in the head 2i, a pair of links 65, a pivotal connecting screw 66 in plate 60 for the upper end of each link, and a connecting screw 61 in the handle ball 63 for the lower end of each link. Depressing of the handle 62 will cause the same to pull on the links 65 and the latter will depress the bar 5! against the pull of the spring 6|. Release of the handle will cause the spring 6| to be effective for raising the bar.

The detent means 25 comprises a rod 68 which projects into a clearance seat 69 in the head 2|, a collar I0 on said rod which serves to confine a compression spring II in said seat, and selective seats I2, I3 and I4 formed in the upper surface of the bed I! and receptive of the lower end of said rod.

The means 26 consists of a forked arm 15 engaged about the rod 68 and positioned beneath the collar ID, a pivot I6 for said arm on the head 2|, a transverse bar 11 on the handle bail 63 engaged with an intermediate portion of the arm I5, and a slot I8 in the lower end of each link 65 through which the screws 6! extend. The spring II normally depresses the rod 68 into that seat 72, I3 or I4 which is in register therewith. Whereas, a downward movement of the handle 62, causes a downward movement of the bar 51 and of the tympan 23, an upward movement of said handle will cause the bar 11 to tilt the arm I5 on its pivot, engage the collar I0, and thereby lift the rod 68 against the force of spring II. The slots I8 in links 65 permit this upward movement of the handle to effect freeing of the bed I! from engagement by the detent bar 68, so that said bed can be swung on the bearing means I8. The handle 62 can be released after a short swinging movement of the bed. The spring II will now be effective to press the rod into the seat I2, I3 or 74 next brought into register by continued swinging movement of the bed.

The guide member 21 comprises a casting clamped on post I6 and formed with a guide opening I9 for the lower end of rod 68 to steady the same. The member 21 is, of course, oriented radially with the head 2|.

The reticle means 28 is preferably carried by the member 21 to project radially outward of the atlases;

51 post 16. The :means 28 comprises an :arm :80- ;formedat its outer end with a frame M :for. optical means 82andwith a bracket 83 for engagement with the member .27. As shown, means82 comprises vertically spaced lenses 84 and .85, the .lower of whichis provided withsuitable .cross hairs or markings in the form of :a reticle 86 aiding the positional registering of the means Hand 26. The arm 80-may be-fixedly mountedonas shown, means may be provided for vertically adjusting said arm to "bring the lenses 84 and 35 to a desiredoptical spacingjfrom either plate P or dial D. Accordingly, the bracket 83 is formed with vertically disposed slots 81 for bolts or screws 88 securing the. armBDto the memberZl. However,

instead of the bolts directly clamping the arm in place, one or more springs 89 extending between pairs of screws 88 pass through holes 90 in said arm and bear against a wall .of each hole to effect a frictional engagement between the springs Y89 and the armBll. The arm 80 is thereby adapted to be variably .vertically positioned as desired.

In operation:

The printing plate P is placed on the block 40, engaged with the undercut pins 9!, and held thereagainst by spring-tensioned clamp lever 92 carried by block 4%]. The dial D to be printed is pressed into place in the beeswax 53 of the block 52. The handle 52 is lifted to withdraw the rod 68 from detent engagement with the bed I! and said bed is swung to bring the printing plate beneath the reticle means 28 as in Fig. 4. A selected engraving on the plate P is oriented with the reticle 85 by releasing the friction between block 4|] and bed I! and moving the block accordingly. The mentioned friction is then reestablished. The same operation of orientation is carried out for the dial D by first swinging the bed to bring block 52 beneath the reticle and then moving the block to orient the dial with the reticle. Next, the printing plate is inked and excess ink removed from the surface of said plate. If the dial D to be imprinted has a lacquered surface, the tympan 23 is powdered with talc or French chalk to prevent sticking of the dial to the tympan. The bed is then again swung to register the printing plate, with the tympan, and the latter, by depressing the handle 62, is pressed against the inked printing plate to receive the ink from the engraving. The tympan is raised, the bed is swung to bring the dial D into register therewith, and the tympan is then again depressed to impress on the dial the imprint which it received from the printing plate.

When rod 68 is engaged in seat '14 as in Fig. 4, the reticle means and the printing plate are in register. When said rod is engaged in seat 13, the reticle means is in register with the dial and the tympan is in register with the printing plate. When said rod is in seat 12, the tympan is in register with the dial. The bed ll, therefore, has three positions; two for effecting orientation of the printing plate and dial by means of the reticle; one of said positions being used for effecting a transfer of ink from the printing plate to the tympan; and a third for registering the tympan and dial for imprinting the latter.

While we have illustrated and described what we now regard as the preferred embodiment of our invention, the construction is, of course, subject to modifications without departing from the spirit and scope of our invention. We, therefore, do not wish to restrict ourselves to the particular form of construction illustrated and described, but desire to avail ourselves of :all modifications that may :fall within the scope :of the appendedaclaims.

Having thus described our'invention, what we claim and desire .to secure by Letters Patent .is:

1. .An offset printer comprising atfixed support, an adjustably movable-bed .on the support, a tympan carried by the support and movable toward and from :the bed, spring means lfOT normally holding the tympan :away from the bed, manual handle means for moving said'tympan.

toward the bed, .:a printing plate holder and .a watch dial holder each individually and .relativelyadjustably carried by the i:bed,.and.=detent means forhol'ding the bed in "adjustedposition,

said detent means comprising a spring tpresse'd' rod;carrie,d by :the support and extending toward the bed, and selectiveseats in the bed for 're-' ceiving one end of said rod, and :means coupled with the handlemeans and engaged with'the rod.

for moving said rod away from saidseats upon movement of the handlemeansinza direction 011- posite'to its movement whenmoving'thestympan toward the bed.

2. Inxan oifsetzprinter aiswingablebedhaving a plurality of seats, a support frame for the bed, a spring-urged detent rod carried by the frame and movable toward the bed for selective engagement in said seats, a tympan above the bed, handle means connected to the tympan and movable in one direction for moving said tympan toward the bed, and on operative connection between the handle means and the rod for moving the latter in a direction away from the seats upon movement of the handle means and the tympan away from the bed.

3. In an offset printer, a support frame, reticle means carried by said frame, a bed carried by the frame and movable relative thereto, at least two adjustable late holders on said bed, and manually releasable means for frictionally holding the plate holders in adjusted position on the bed with respect to the reticle means.

4. In an offset printer, a movable member having an opening therethrough, a plate holder on the member and havin a stem extending through the opening and movable laterally within the limits of said opening, a plate against the under face of said member and fixed to the stem, and spring-urged means carried by the member and exerting a pressure on the mentioned plate, and thereby creating a frictional force between the plate holder and the member.

5. In an offset printer, a movable member having an opening therethrough, a plate holder on the member and having a stem extending through the opening and movable laterally within the limits of said opening, a plate against the under face of said member and fixed to the stem, spring-urged means carried by the member and exerting a pressure on the mentioned plate and thereby creating a frictional force between the plate holder and the member, and a manual lever engaged with said pins for lifting the same and thereby releasing the mentioned frictional force.

6. An offset printer comprising a support, a bed swingably mounted on said support and having three seats therein, a first plate holder adjustably carried by the bed in general radial alignment with one of said seats, a. second plate holder similarly carried by the bed in general alignment with another of said seats, optical means including a reticle fixedly carried by the frame and adapted to guide the manual adjustment of the plates on the bed and relative to each other, a tympan carried by the frame above the bed, handle means carried by the frame and engaged with the tympan to move the latter for impress engagement with plates on said holders, and detent means including a rod connected to the handle means and movable together with the tympan into selective engagement in said seats to selectively and operatively align the optical means and the plate holders and the tympan and the plate holders.

7. An ofiset printer comprising a support, a bed swingably mounted on said support and having three seats therein, a first plate holder adjustably carried by the bed in general radial alignment with one of said seats, a second plate holder similarly carried by the bed in general alignment with another of said seats, optical means including a reticle fixedly carried by the frame and adapted to guide the manual adjustment of the plates on the bed and relative to each other, a tympan carried by the frame above the bed, handle means carried b the frame and engaged with the tympan to move the latter for impress engagement with plates on said holders,

8 detentmeans including a rod connected to the handle means and movable together with the tympan into selective engagement in said seats to selectively and operatively align the optical means and the plate holder and the tympan and the plate holders, and spring means effective upon manual release of the handl for moving the tympan away from the bed and subsequently withdrawing the rod from the seat in which it is engaged.

JOHN McK. BALLOU.

OSCAR C. FILLIUNG.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,302,920 Hatt May 6, 1919 1,599,917 OHara Sept. 14, 1926 1,655,427 Lund Jan. 10, 1928 1,737,925 Gydesen Dec. 3, 1929 1,779,091 Glass Oct. 21, 1930 2,148,563 Kingsley Feb. 28, 1939

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1302920 *Jun 16, 1916May 6, 1919 Machine for making printing plates
US1599917 *Apr 16, 1926Sep 14, 1926Eliot O'haraAttachment for steel die and plate presses
US1655427 *Nov 19, 1923Jan 10, 1928United Shoe MachinWork presenting device
US1737925 *Dec 24, 1927Dec 3, 1929Printers Supply CompanyInsert-printing device
US1779091 *Jul 13, 1927Oct 21, 1930United Shoe Machinery CorpMarking machine
US2148563 *Oct 12, 1936Feb 28, 1939 Work supporting device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5302224 *Jun 18, 1992Apr 12, 1994Fashion Nails, Inc.Method and apparatus for creating images on nails
US5960798 *Feb 26, 1998Oct 5, 1999Fashion Nails, Inc.Method and apparatus for creating art on an object such as a person's fingernail or toenail
US5988179 *Apr 8, 1998Nov 23, 1999Fashion Nails, Inc.Method and machine for creating nail art on person's digit
US6024099 *Aug 5, 1998Feb 15, 2000Fashion Nails, Inc.Apparatus for creating art on an object such as the nail of a person's digit or a golf ball and method for making same
US6029673 *Apr 2, 1999Feb 29, 2000Fashion Nails, Inc.Method and apparatus for creating art on a person's fingernail or toenail
US6085757 *May 13, 1998Jul 11, 2000Fashion Nails, Inc.Method and apparatus for creating art on an object such as the nail of a person's digit or a golf ball
US6189541Oct 13, 1999Feb 20, 2001Fashion Nails. Inc.Method and machine for creating nail art on person's digit
WO1999043232A1 *Feb 25, 1999Sep 2, 1999Fashion Nails IncImproved apparatus for creating art
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/41, 101/407.1, 968/704, 101/163
International ClassificationG04D3/00, B41F17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41F17/00, G04D3/0048
European ClassificationB41F17/00, G04D3/00B14C