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Publication numberUS2520499 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateAug 29, 1950
Filing dateNov 16, 1948
Priority dateNov 24, 1947
Publication numberUS 2520499 A, US 2520499A, US-A-2520499, US2520499 A, US2520499A
InventorsLeon Golaz Charles
Original AssigneeLeon Golaz Charles
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Roof
US 2520499 A
Images(3)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Aug. 29, 1950 c, GQLAZ 2,520,499

ROOF Filed. Nov. 16, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Wa t/$3 %a INVENTDR CHARLES Lion Gouxz ATTORNEYS C. L. 'GOLAZ Aug. 29, 1950 ROOF.

Filed Nov. 16, 1948 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 M L 5 m T N NN M M r N ILJUA R Y Ms C Aug. 29, 1950 c. L. GOLAZ 2,520,499

ROOF

Filed Nov. 16, 1948 a Sheets-Sheet a J72 J6; J" 16 4e 4 5 3 INVENTUR S Cannes LEON GOLAZ BY ATTORNEYS Patented Aug. 29, 1950 LSZtAQt Charles Lon Golaz, Tamatave, Madagascar Application November 16, 1948, Serial No. 60,199 In France November 24, 1947 The present invention relates to roofs, and in particular metallic roofs for colonial buildings.

My invention is concerned with roofs of the kind described in my prior U. S. applications Ser. No. 705,280, filed Oct. 24, 1945, for Roofing-s. Its object is to provide improvements in such roofs.

Preferred embodiments of my invention will be hereinafter described with reference to the accompanying. drawings, given merely by Way of example, and in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a portion of a roof made according to the present invention, the covering elements being removed on the right hand. side of this figure, so as to. show the framework;

Fig. 2 is a perspective View of a tile of the roof covering shown by Fig. 1;.

Fig. 3 also shows in perspective view a tile made according to a modification;

Fig. 4 is a longitudinal section of the roof of Fig. 1, on the line IV--IV of this figure;

Fig. 5 is a longitudinal section on the line V-V of Fig. 1;

Fig. 6 is a transverse section on the line VIVI of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 shows, in cross section, the detail of assembly of two adjoining tiles on a frame-work element;

Fig. 8 illustrates the same detail in the case of tiles made according to the modification of Fig. 3

Figs. 9 to 11 are transverse sections showing three modifications of the same detail of assembly;

Fig. 12 shows, in transverse section, the detail of the assembly of a tile with a hip-rafter;

Fig. 13 is a longitudinal section of a particular assembly of two successive tiles;

Fig. 14 is a, transverse section of a roof covered with concave flanged tiles and convex flanged tiles;

Fig. 15 illustrates, still in transverse section, another embodiment of a structure as disclosed by Fig. 14;

Fig. 16 shows, in longitudinal section, a particular system of assembly of the tiles on the purlins of the framework, this system being intended to ensure perfect safety;

Fig. 17 is a view similar to Fig. 1 illustrating still another embodiment of my invention;

Figs. 18 and 19 show, in section parallel to the slope of the roof, two systems for securing the covering elements;

Finally, Fig. 20 is a section on the line XX,-XX

of Fig. 19.

14 Claims. (01. 10813) The framework of the roof, in the embodiments hereinafter described, includes ratters 2 supporting transverse purlins 3.

This framework is covered with a plurality of elements 4 called, in the present description, tiles although they diiier in many points from conventional tiles.

As already described in my prior patent above referred to, these tiles are disposed to make each an angle (preferably approximately the same for all of them) with the general direction of rafters so that the whole constitutes a succession of steps. Each step corresponds to the interval between two successive purlins 3 and fixation means 5 (for instance nails or screws) extendmg in a direction substantially parallel to the general slope of the roof secure the tiles to the framework (for instance to the lower side wall of purlins 3).

For this purpose, each tile is advantageously made of rectangular shape, with. upper and lower sides bent at right angles, one downwardly and the other upwardly, to form flanges l and 4 The upper flange 4" of a tile is applied against the lower side wall of a purlin and is covered by the lower flange 4 of the tile located immediately above.

Such tiles may be made of any suitable material, such as clay, fibre-cement, etc., but preferably, for roofings of tropical buildings, they are made of sheet metal, the main portion of the tile being preferably plane.

According to a feature of the present invention, each tile, made, in a general manner, as

above described, is provided with lateral. upward With such an arrangement, supposing that two adjacent tiles are separated from each other by a rod it supported by purlins 3, the flanges 4a of the two respective tiles applied against the sides of said rod It will be covered by means of an arch-shaped cover ll adapted to span the whole of rod i6 and said two flanges la.

Advantageously, each cover ll includes, in addition to its lateral flanges Ila, a lower flange H" and an upper flange ll.

Lateral flanges Ila are advantageously of a height corresponding substantially to that of rods l6 and flanges l'l and I7 are made of a height approximately equal to the sum of the heights of a purlin 3 and a rod IS, the flanges 4 and 4 of tiles 4 being then made of a height corresponding to that of a purlin 3 whereas their i flanges ia are made of a height corresponding to that of said rods l6.

It is pointed out that, in order to facilitate transportation and storing of the tiles, the flanges of said tiles may be bent at an obtuse angle to the main part thereof, as shown by Fig. 3.

In this case, of course, rods l6 and covers il' will be made of trapezoidal section.

With an arrangement as above described, the tiles, fixed on their four sides on the framework, are assembled in a perfectly watertight manner. At every point of its outline, each tile is protected against rain or wind infiltration since, along its lateral sides, it is covered by a cover ll, at the top it is covered by the overlapping lower flange of the tile located above it, whereas, at the bottom it is bent downwardly to cover the upper flange of the tile located under it.

This structure does not include any part driven perpendicularly to the general surface of the roof and therefore no infiltration can take place at the points of fixation.

On the other hand, as the tiles are each fixed along its four sides, it is possible to make use of longer tiles which involves a reduction of the costs for covering a given area. Finally, due to their lateral fixation on rods it, the tiles are less liable to vibrations of the kind of those which may occur when a violent wind is acting on an ordinary sheet metal roof covering.

Concerning the connection of the covering with the ridge-piece, it will be effected in the same manner as described in my above mentioned prior patent application, i. e. by providing, if necessary, between the lower flanges oi the tiles of the last row at the top and the purlin located immediately below the ridge-piece, a thickness piece capable of compensating for the excess of length of said tiles with respect to the height of the strip that remains to be covered.

. As for the covering of the width of a roof slope, it will suflice, if this width does not constitute a true multiple of the width of the tiles,

to reduce the width of the tile resting on the ridge piece (if such a piece exists) and then to form a new flange on this side of the tile.

In the particular case of roof surfaces of trapezoidal or triangular shape, the angle tiles must 'be cut to fit on the ridge pieces, suitable flanges being formed along the edges thus cut.

Figs. 4 to '7 are sectional views intended to illustrate the above stated features.

' It has been supposed, in the preceding description, that the tiles were intended to be secured to a wood framework, but, according to my invention, these tiles can be used in the same manner in the case of a metallic framework in which 'l'i so that the flanges Ila thereof are applied against the outer faces of said irons ifla.

If the rod is constituted by a single angle iron 55a, as illustrated by Fig. 10, I may associate with 'said element a wood rod i6 about which is fitted cover ll, transverse tie-rods [8 being advantageously provided to keep the various elements of the assembly tightly applied against one another.

If the rod is constituted by an inverted T iron,

as shown by Fig. 11, the lateral flanges 4a of the tiles may be applied against the respective sides of the vertical portion of said iron i'ta, the three thicknesses of metal thus juxtaposed being surrounded by cover I? the branches i'la of which are at a distance from each other substantially equal to the total of these three thicknesses.

If, instead of metallic tiles, I make use of fibrocement or analogous tiles, a particular arrangement is to be used for connection of the tiles with a ridge piece, because, in this case, it is not possible, after having out off a portion of the tile, to form a flange along the new edge. I may, for this purpose, make use of the arrangement of Fig. 12.

As shown by the drawing, I provide an independent flange piece or angle piece l9 one of the sides of which rests upon tile 4 whereas the other side bears against the ridge piece lBb, a ridge-piece cover I? surrounding the whole of said ridge-piece and the last mentioned side of piece I9.

Advantageously, suitable means will be provided for fixing said piece is on purlins 3 and cementing means will be applied to prevent any infiltration of water between the lower wing of piece it and the tile 4 on which it rests.

However, this may b avoided by preliminarily providing, against the ridge piece 561), a piece 13%, for instance of zinc, curved at its lower part so as to form a drain lilBb, whereby any water as may have leaked is evacuated through this kind of gutter iilflb.

Fig. 13 shows a particular embodiment of the invention according to which, instead of keeping the upper flanges of tiles 4 and covers I! in contact with the lower flanges of the corresponding tiles and covers of the row located immediately above (case of Fig. 4) the tiles and covers are made substantially longer than the distance between purlins 3, whereby a space may remain between the corresponding upper flanges 4 and the lower flanges d each tile and cover thus extending slightly beyond (in the downward direction) the purlin 3 on which the corresponding element (tile or cover) is resting.

The interval between said flanges will then be filled by a small block IH.

Furthermore, in order in particular to reduce the height of the respective flanges and also to reduce the load supported by each flange, the upper ends of tiles 4 may rest on a' supporting wood block I52, provided along every purlin on the lower side wall thereof.

It should be noted that block Hi will tend to prevent inflltrations of water between the two flanges located on opposite sides of said block. Fluidtightness of the assembly may be further improved by bending downthe upper edge a of the upper flange 4 of the tile, as shown by Fig. 16. In this case, block HI serves also to prevent crushing of this curved edge.

by Figs. 14 and 15. r

7 said rods, said means being parallel to the direction of the purlins.

5. A roof according to claim 1 further including means extending parallel to the slope of the roof, through said upper and lower flanges for fixing them to said purlins, and means parallel to the direction of said purlins extending through said rod covers and the lateral flanges of said tiles for fixing them to said tiles.

6. A roof according to claim 1 in which said flanges are at right angles to said flat part of the tile.

7. A roof according to claim 1 in which said flanges make obtuse angles with said flat .part of the tile.

3. A roof according to claim 1 in which an inter-val is left between the upper flange of a tile and the lower flange of the next tile above it, a block being interposed between said two flanges.

9. A roof according to claim 1 in which an interval is left between the upper flange of a tile and the lower flange of the next tile above it, a block being interposed between said two flanges, the upper edge of said upper flange being curved downwardly.

10. A roof which comprises, in combination, inclined rafters, interspaced purlins carried by said rafters transversely thereto, a plurality of rods, each interposed between two consecutive purlins, located in vertical planes parallel to the vertical planes of said rafters, said rods being mounted to make with a horizontal plane an angle smaller than the angle made with this plane by the rafters, a first set of rectangular tiles of a width equal to the interval between 9 two consecutive rods, each tile including a flat main part and flanges along the four sides thereof, the flanges along the upper and lateral sides of the tile extending upwardly and the flange along the lower side extending downwardly, a second set of rectangular tiles of a width equal to the interval between two consecutive rods, each tile of this second mentioned set in cluding a flat main part and flanges along the four sides thereof, the flange along the upper side of the tile extending upwardly and the flanges along the lower and lateral sides extending downwardly, said tiles being juxtaposed in rows, so that the tiles of the first set alternate,

in each row, with those of the second set, with their upper and lower flanges applied against the lower sides of said purlins, the lower flanges of each row covering the upper flanges of the row immediately below it, the lateral flanges of said tiles being applied along the opposite sides of consecutive rods, and covering one another,

11. A roof which comprises, in combination, inclined rafters, interspaced purlins carried by said rafters transversely thereto, a plurality of rods, each interposed between two consecutive purlins, located in line with one another in vertical planes parallel to the vertical planes of said rafters, the upper end of each of said rods resting directly on one purlin and the lower end thereof resting upon the upper end of the next rod lcated below it, so that each rod makes with a horizontal plane an angle smaller than the angle made with this plane by the rafters, a plurality of rectangular tiles of a width equal to the interval between two consecutive rods, each tile including a flat main part and flanges along the four sides thereof, the flanges along the upper and lateral sides of the tile extending upwardly and the flanges alone the lower side extending downwardly, said tiles being juxtaposed in rows, with their upper and lower flanges located above said purlins, the lower flanges of each row covering the upper flanges of the row immediately below it, the lateral flanges of said tiles being applied along the respective sides of said rods, and a cover extending over each of said rods and provided with downward flanges covering thelateral flanges of the tiles located n either side of said rod.

12. A roof which comprises, in combination, inclined rafters, intersp'aced purlins carried by said rafters transversely thereto, a plurality of rods, each interposed between two consecutive purlins, located in line with one another in vertical planes parallel to the vertical planes of said rafters, the upper end of each of said rods resting directly on one purlin and the lower end thereof resting upon the upper end of the next rod located below it, s that each rod makes with a horizontal plane an angle smaller than the angle made with this plane by the rafters, a first set of rectangular tiles of a width equal to the interval between two consecutive rods, each tile including a flat main part and flanges along the four sides thereof, the flanges along the upper and lateral sides of the tile extending upwardly and the flange along the lower side extending downwardly, a second set of rectangular tiles of a width equal to the interval between two consecutive rods, each tile of this second mentioned set including a flat main part and flanges along the four sides thereof, the flange along the upper side of the tile extending upwardly and the flanges along the lower and lateral sides extending downwardly, said tiles being juxtaposed in rows, so that the tiles of the first set alternate, in each row with those of the second set, with their upper and lower flanges located above said purlins, the lower flanges of each row covering the upper flanges of the row immediately below it, the lateral flanges of said tiles being applied along the opposite sides of consecutive rods, and covering one another.

13. A roof according to claim 11 further including means parallel to the direction of the purlins extending through said rod covers and the lateral flanges of said tiles for fixing them to said rods.

14. A roof according to claim 12 in which said flanges make obtuse angles with the flat parts of the tiles, said rods having their under face wider than their upper face to accommodate the lateral flanges of the tiles, the upper ends of the lateral flanges of each tile being caught under the projecting under faces of the rods. carrying the tile located immediately above.

CHARLES LE'ON GOLAZ.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Germany 1937

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US16614 *Feb 10, 1857 Metallic hoofing
US20636 *Jun 22, 1858 Metallic roofing
US720030 *Apr 28, 1902Feb 10, 1903Georg HuthMetallic roofing.
US2070130 *Jan 2, 1936Feb 9, 1937Johnson Warren BShingle
DE654049C *Dec 17, 1937Felix Ritter Kalbacher Von TueAbdeckplatte aus Metall mit aufgebogenen Laengsraendern und hakenfoermig umgelegten Querraendern
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2725832 *Jan 8, 1951Dec 6, 1955Huntington Glen HSheet metal roofing
US4219981 *Sep 11, 1978Sep 2, 1980Ahi Operations LimitedReinforcing struts for roofing tiles
US4221093 *Feb 12, 1979Sep 9, 1980Crookston Joseph ASheet metal wall module and wall formed therewith
US5799460 *Feb 27, 1997Sep 1, 1998Brian DaryMethod of shingling a roof and interlocking roofing system
US6708463 *Feb 25, 2002Mar 23, 2004King T. ChaiMethod and apparatus for repairing roof covering
US7513084 *Jun 19, 2006Apr 7, 2009Daniel Efrain ArguellesPan tile for roofing system
US8468756Jan 18, 2011Jun 25, 2013Daniel Efrain ArguellesPan tile roofing system
US8628154 *May 11, 2011Jan 14, 2014Panduit Corp.Aisle containment system
US20110278998 *May 11, 2011Nov 17, 2011Panduit Corp.Aisle Containment System
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/460, 52/471
International ClassificationE04D3/36, E04D3/366
Cooperative ClassificationE04D3/366
European ClassificationE04D3/366