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Publication numberUS2521371 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1950
Filing dateMay 8, 1946
Priority dateMay 8, 1946
Publication numberUS 2521371 A, US 2521371A, US-A-2521371, US2521371 A, US2521371A
InventorsGoodwillie John E, Lloyd Hornbostel
Original AssigneeBeloit Iron Works
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dipper for grooved drier drums
US 2521371 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 5, 1950 L.. HoRNBosTEL. l-:TAL 2,521,371

. DIPPER RoR GRoovED DRIER DRUMS Filed May s, 194e 2 Sheets-#sheet 1 Sept. 5, 1950 HORNBos-[EL ETAL 2,521,371

DIPPER FOR GROOVED DRIER DRUMS Filed May 8, 194e 2 sheets-shea f2 j 112517. UFE m1/ Hoe/vaasrfz.

@@J/Ma@ mi Patented Sept. 5, 1950 v,UNITED STATES Pars-Nr OFFICE infrarroja onoovooiomsa Daems Lloyd Hornbostel and John lGroodwillie, Beloit, Wis., assignors to Beloit Iron Works, Beloit, Wis., a rcorporation of Wisconsin, l t

Application May s, 194e, serial N-of te,o59

heating non in the cylinder 'to the exterior dryin'g surface of the cylinder. The grooved drum or 'cylinder Vcons'ori'ioton makes possible produc-A tion o'f relatively lightweight thin walled heat conducting drums th'atfar'e Suiciently strong to withstand high internal Vpies's'ufr"es of' steam or vother 'heating `iluid. As a result 'of this dru'm construction high 's'teain'pressures `can 'be used 'in the drum to 'more 'efficiently heat'the cylinder surface of the drum.

Removal of steam brother heating 'fluid condensa'te from the 'interior ofthe grooved drum to prevent formation 'of 'insulating layers 'or pools of condensate in the grooves is 'made possible, according to this invention, by Jdipper devices which extend lengthwise in the cylinder and have projections Veiiterrding into 'the valleys 'or grooves.

In a rst illustrated embodiment of'the invention, theseprojections 'take 'the form of teeth or 6 ontims.f (ol. 34a-125) groove fitting tabs on the 'back' wall "of a scoop the invention, a header pipe extends lengthwise oi 'the cylinder 'interior 'and has a lip member projecting forwardly therefrom to overlie vthe ribs. Angle members 'define 'troughs under 'the lip between the header 'and apertured front Walls seated `in the grooves. Fluid pass-es through the apertures in these 'front'walls 'under 'the 'lip into and through 'the troughs lvinto the header. vin a third illustrated embodiment 'olf the invention, the header pipe lis equipped with forwardly 'projecting itubeswhich extend into the grooves. vin some instances only 'some of the "grooves or troughs in the cylinder receive uid conducting tubes or conduit devices. For example inthe "il lustrated third "embodiment of the inventionthe tubes only extend into alternate grooves.

Itfis vthen an 'object off 'this invention `to pron vide alll'ie'aitiri'g i for 'drying l'dill'lll 'Constructatably mounted in vbearings tion having 'an internally grooved shell and a dipper or condensate removal device extending into the grooves of the shell.

A 'further object of the invention is to provide an internally grooved drier drum with a dipper having-local portionsv extending into the grooves of the 'shell to remove uid therefrom.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a dipper construction for internally grooved drier drums or heating cylinders.

'Afstill further object of the invention is to pron vide a drier drum construction for paper ma chinos `and the like which has an internally ribbed drier shell and adipper extending into valleys between the ribs for removing steam condensate-orthe like from the shell.

Other and further objects of the invention will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the 'following detailed description lof the annexed 'sheets off drawings which,l by Way of preferred example only'illustrate several embodiments of the invention.vr j

- Figure-1 is ajside elevational view, with parts invertical -cross section, illustrating an internally grooved drier drum equipped with 'one form of clipper construction according to this invention.

Figure 2 isv av transverse Yfragmentary cross sectional' View, with parts in end elevation, taken along the line II-II of Fig. 1.

Figure 3 is a fragmentary longitudinal cross sectional View, with parts inside elevation, taken along the line III-III of Fig. 2. VFigure 4 is a view similar to Fig. 2 but illustratrng `la first modified embodiment of the invention.

Figure 5 is la longitudinal cross sectional View, 'with parts inside elevation, taken along the line V-V of Fig. 4'.

FigureA 6 is a longitudinal cross sectional view, with l'parts in elevation, taken along the line VI- VI of Fig. 4. j

Figure 7 is a View similar to Fig. 2 lbut illustrating'a, thi-rd embodiment oi the invention.

Figure 8 isa longitudinal cross sectional view, with parts in side elevation, `taken along the line VIII-VIII of Fig. 7.

As shown on the drawings:

In Fig. 1 the reference numeral IIJ designatesA generally 'adrier rdrum construction having a cylindrical shell "Iil closed at its [ends by end heads 12, I2 carrying axles I3, I3 which .are roy I4 on support stands' I5.

The

ariesflrs lhaveportions 'fsa' 'amending into f the shell Il from the heads or ends I2 and receiving a separating plate I6 between their proximate inner ends. The plate I6 is clamped between outturned flanges of the axle portions I 3a and is held in position by bolts extended through these portions and the plate. Nozzles I1 extend from the plate I6 and communicate with the interior of the axle portion I3a on one side of the plate I6. A steam feed pipe I8 extends through the axle portion I3 to supply steam to the interior of the portion I3a for feeding steam into the shell II through the nozzles I'I. The axle portion I3@ on the other side of the plate IS has a condensate drain line I9 communicating with the interior thereof to remove condensate from the interior of the shell II. Therefore steam is introduced into the interior of the drum construction I through the axle I 3a on one side of the plate IS and condensate is removed from the interior of the drum through the axle portion I3a on the other side of the plate I6.

The cylinder II is grooved around the inner face thereof to provide circular ribs around the inside of the cylinder between the heads I2. These ribs 20 are separated by valleys or grooves 2l. The valleys and ribs can have any desired cross sectional shape. As illustrated in Fig. 1 a substantially V-shaped cross section is utilized.

Dippers 22 are mounted in the drum ID in diametrioally opposed relation and extend lengthwise of the shell II between the end heads I2 of the drum. Each dipper 22 is connected through a drain tube or pipe 23 with the interior of the axle portion I3a on the drain side of the partition plate I6,v Condensate from the dippers 22 is thereby removed through this axle portion I3a into the drain line I9.

Each dipper 22 has a back wall 22a as shown in Figs. 1 to 3 extending along the full length of the cylinder I I and equipped with a scalloped or tabbed free end portion 22h with recesses receiving the ribs 2B and tabs projecting into the bottoms of the grooves 2 I. A top wall 22e extends forwardly in the direction of rotation of the cylinder from the top end of the back wall 22a and slopes downwardly to a portion 22d resting on top of the ribs 2i?. The top wall then extends inwardly along a sweeping path toward the central portion of the cylinderY to provide a scoop-like lip 22e.

The dipper cooperates with the ribbed interior of the cylinder II to provide an inlet mouth 24 having an appreciable width at its inlet end along the entire length of the cylinder lI and converging to a throatportion 25 best shown in Fig. 2 which is divided into individual passages by the ribs 20. The throat 25 is only as wide as the depth of the grooves 2l. The throat 25 then discharges into an enlarged chamber 26 backed by the back wall 22a. This chamber 26 is emptied through an aperture 23a into the pipe 23 on the back wall 22a. l

The dippers 22 are aiixed to and rotate with the cylinder or shell I I.

In operation, condensate from the heating uid introduced into the drum by the nozzles I'I is scooped through the mouth portion 24 of a dipper 22 and through theindividual throats 2-5 between the ribs. 22 into 'the chamber 26 of the dipper. The liquid '-,cannot flow out of the chamber 25 because the back wall 22a of the dipper extends down into the grooves and either snugly engages the shell or has close clearance relationship therewith. As the drum rotates the dipper to levels above the drain line 23, the uid in the chamber 26 will drain through the line 23 into the axle I3a and then out through the drain line The dippers are effective for removing ponds of condensate at the bottom of the shell as well as for removing films of condensate held by centrifugal force against ythe grooved interior of the shell provided of course that there films are thick enough to be retained by the tab portions 2217 on the back wall of the dipper. If desired the tabs can have a predetermined spaced relationship with the grooves defining walls of the shell so that iilms of desired thickness can remain in the grooves.

In the embodiment of the invention, shown in .Figs..4 to 6, the internally grooved drier drum I0 is equipped with a modified arrangement of dippers 30. These dippers 30 each include a header pipe 3l extending along the length of the cylinder II. A forwardly projecting curved lip plate 32 is welded to the forward lower portion of the pipe 3l along the full length of the pipe. A series of angle members 33 are welded to the underface of the lip 32 and to the header pipe 3l to project from the pipe into the grooves 2I. Thus the angle members 33 are welded along the longi tudinal edges of their side walls at 34 to the lip 32 as shown in Fig. 6 and are welded at their back ends as at 35 to the pipe 3| as shown in Fig, 4.

The front ends of the angle members 33 are covered with triangular shaped Iplates 36 which are welded thereto. These plates 36 are also welded to the underface of the lip 32 and extend from the lip into the grooves 2I to closely t alongside of the ribs 2li as shown in Fig. fl. The plates 36 have orifices or apertures 3l therein near their lower edges.

A series of chambers 38 are thereby provided under the lip '32 for receiving condensate from the grooves 2I through the apertures 3l in their leading lower front faces. The rear ends of these chambers 38 communicate through apertures 39 with the interior of the header pipe or tube 3l. The tube 3l is drained by drain line 40 in the same manner as the dippers 22.

The lip 32 projects forwardly from the tube 3l into contact with the apices of the ribs 2li and then curves inwardly toward the center of the cylinder II to provide a wide inlet mouth 4I converging to inlet throats 42 in the grooves 2I which are backed by the plates 36 and are drained through the orifices 3l.

Two dippers 3U in diametrically opposed relation are used in the drum I0 in the same manner as the dippers 22 shown in Fig. 1.

The modified dipper arrangement of Figs. 4 to 6 operates in the same manner as the dipper of Figs. 1 to 3 but includes individual passageways from the grooves of the drier cylinder to a common header pipe. AS in the case of the dipper shown in Figs. 1 to 3, the modified dipper of Figs. 4 to 6 rotates with the drum to scoop condensate from the interior of the drum including the condensate contained in the grooves of the drum cylinder.

In the embodiment shown in Figs. 7 and 8 the condensate in the interior of the drum is removed by another form of dipper arrangement also used in diametrically opposed pairs as shown in Fig. 1.

Each dipper A5 includes a longitudinally extending header pipe or tube 46 drained by a drain line 4l and having a series of nozzle tubes 48 projecting forwardly therefrom as shown. The

nozzle tubes 48 extend into some of the grooves 2| of the cylinder ll and have open forward ends arranged for scooping uid contained in the grooves into the header 46. As shown in Fig. 7 only alternate grooves 2| contain the tubes 48. Fluid in the grooves not containing the tubes 48 can be removed by overflowing these grooves or by providing communicating passageways between the grooves (not shown).

In all embodiments of the invention the dipl per extends across the full length of the grooved cylinder and has means arranged for extending into the grooves of the cylinder to scoop condensate or other fluid contained in these grooves into a drain line. The dippers rotate with the cylinder and can be securely aiiixed to the cylinder to prevent development of loose parts and scraping action such as occurs with the use of stationary dippers in a rotating cylinder.

It will, of course, be understood that various details of construction may be varied through a wide range without departing from the principles of this invention and it is, therefore, not the purpose to limit the patent granted hereon otherwise than necessitated by the scope of the appended claims.

We claim as our invention:

1. A dipper construction for use in an internally grooved drying drum having a plurality of spaced parallel, circumferential grooves around the inner face thereof separated by circular ribs, said dipper construction comprising an elongated fluid conduit for overlying the ribs of the drum along the length of the drum and having an apertured back wall carrying projections for extending into the bottoms of the grooves of said drum, a forwardly extending wall on said conduit for contacting the tops of said ribs of the drum and a turned out lip on the forward end of said forwardly extending wall for forming an enlarged inlet entrance mouth to the chamber formed between said forwardly extending wall and said drum for directing fluid into the conduit while said projections dam off flow of the fiuid in the grooves beyond the back wall.

2. A clipper for use in an internally grooved drying drum having a plurality of spaced circumferential grooves around the inner faces thereof and separated by circular ribs, said dipper comprising an elongated fluid conduit extending along the length of said inner faces and having a back wall having an aperture therein and carrying projections for extending into the grooves of said drum to preventthe flow of fluid in the grooves beyond the back wall, a forwardly extending wall on said conduit for contacting the ribs of said drum, said forwardly extending wall terminating in a turned out lip defining an enlarged entrance mouth to the inlet chamber formed by said forwardly extending wall, and the inner face of said drum.

3. A dipper for use in an internally grooved drier drum having a plurality of spaced parallel circumferential grooves around the inner faces thereof and separated by circular ribs, said dipper construction comprising a back wall portion having an aperture therein and a scalloped free lower edge arranged for closely fitting alternate grooves and ribs of the drum, a top wall portion extending forwardly from the upper edge of said back wall in spaced relation to said scalloped free lower edge, and a raised lip on the forward end of said top wall for overlying said ribs in contact therewith to dene an enlarged inlet mouth.

4. A dipper construction for use in an internally grooved drier drum having a plurality of spaced parallel circumferential grooves on the inner face thereof separated by circular ribs, said dipper construction comprising an elongated header pipe, a lip plate extending forwardly from said header pipe along the length thereof and having an upturned terminal lip extending forwardly from the upper free edge thereof, a plurality of V-shaped angle members along the length of the pipe beneath said plate to define back wall portions, said angle members cooperating to denne a scalloped free lower edge arranged for closely tting alternate grooves and ribs of the drum and cooperating with said lip plate to define a plurality of troughs underlying said lip plate, apertured front walls under the lip plate and cooperating with said angle members and said lip plate to define front walls for said troughs,

and said header pipe having apertures therein joining the troughs with the interior of said header pipe.

5. In an internally grooved drier drum having a plurality of spaced parallel grooves around the inner faces thereof and separated by circular ribs, a dipper for removing condensate from said drum comprising an elongated back wall extending axially of the drum and having an aperture therein together with depending lower projections extending edgewise into said grooves, said projections damming off the free HOW of uid in the grooves, without covering an extended area of the cylinder wall, and an upper turned out lip extending forwardly of said back wall and contacting the ribs of said drum beyond the dipper, and said turned out lip directing iiuid from said grooves against said projections and into said dipper, and a chamber dened by said back wall in cooperation with said projections and said lip for receiving iiuid scooped into the clipper by said projections.

6. A drier drum assembly comprising a rotatably mounted drum having a cylindrical shell with alternate grooves and ribs extending around the inner face of the drum along the length thereof, a pair of diametrically opposed dippers in said shell extending along substantially the axial length of said shell, each of said dippers having an apertured back wall provided with lower depending projections extending into said troughs to dam off the free ow of fluid in said grooves beyond said dippers without covering an appreciable area of the cylinder wall, and each of said dippers having a forwardly projecting outturned lip extending from the upper edge of said back wall and contacting said ribs for directing fluid into the dipper associated therewith, and drain lines from said dippers for emptying condensate therefrom.

LLOYD HORNBOSTEL.

JOHN E. GOODWILLIE.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,108,077 Kilberry Aug. 18, 1914 1,248,589 Wyld Dec. 4, 1917 1,483,343 Gladin Feb. 12, 1924 1,670,113 Harrison May 15, 1928 1,837,562 Mayer Dec. 22, 1931 1,919,416 Cram July 25, 1933

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1108077 *Jul 12, 1913Aug 18, 1914Rice Barton & Fales Machine & Iron CoDrying-cylinder.
US1248589 *Jul 15, 1915Dec 4, 1917Robert H WyldDrying apparatus.
US1483343 *Apr 18, 1922Feb 12, 1924Gladin Eugene LSlasher cylinder
US1670113 *Apr 14, 1927May 15, 1928Dex Harrison AlbertPaper-drying machine
US1837562 *Mar 16, 1929Dec 22, 1931Charles W MayerCylinder for paper coating machines and the like
US1919416 *Sep 25, 1931Jul 25, 1933Maine Seaboard Paper CompanyEvacuation of condensate
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2677898 *Jan 16, 1950May 11, 1954Pusey & Jones CorpSteam heated drier
US2680007 *Dec 4, 1948Jun 1, 1954Lawrence L ArbuckleRotating heat exchanger
US2724909 *Mar 27, 1953Nov 29, 1955Lukens Steel CoDrum drier
US2791038 *Sep 30, 1953May 7, 1957Armstrong Machine WorksDrainage device or apparatus for steam-heated drying cylinders
US2987305 *May 31, 1957Jun 6, 1961J V Calhoun CompanyMethods of and apparatus for generating and transferring heat
US3241251 *Sep 9, 1963Mar 22, 1966Beloit CorpCylindrical dryer
US3258851 *Sep 17, 1962Jul 5, 1966Beloit CorpDryer construction
US3299531 *Aug 21, 1964Jan 24, 1967Kimberly Clark CoPapermaking machine
US3328896 *May 12, 1965Jul 4, 1967Grenobloise Etude ApplCondensate removal scoop for rotary dryer cylinders
US4232455 *May 2, 1978Nov 11, 1980Beloit CorporationDryer drum condensate removal apparatus
US4369586 *Apr 20, 1981Jan 25, 1983Beloit CorporationDryer siphon
US5564494 *Aug 16, 1994Oct 15, 1996Salminen; Reijo K.Processing roll apparatus and method
US8028439 *Aug 13, 2008Oct 4, 2011Mabe Canada Inc.Clothes dryer bearing gasket support
DE1231269B *Feb 27, 1957Dec 29, 1966Armstrong Machine WorksVorrichtung zur Abfuehrung des Kondensats aus rotierenden, dampfbeheizten Trockenzylindern
DE1461126B *Aug 21, 1965Nov 6, 1969Kimberly Clark CoTrockenzylinder fuer Papiermaschinen
DE1604793B1 *Feb 8, 1961Oct 15, 1970Beloit Iron WorksWalzentrockner
DE1629069B1 *Nov 25, 1966Nov 12, 1970Scott Paper CoWalzentrockner
WO1997021969A1 *Dec 11, 1996Jun 19, 1997Salminen Reijo KProcessing roll apparatus and method
Classifications
U.S. Classification34/125, 165/89
International ClassificationF26B13/18, F26B13/10
Cooperative ClassificationF26B13/183
European ClassificationF26B13/18B