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Publication numberUS2521421 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 5, 1950
Filing dateOct 12, 1946
Priority dateOct 12, 1946
Publication numberUS 2521421 A, US 2521421A, US-A-2521421, US2521421 A, US2521421A
InventorsSpranger Leonard J
Original AssigneeSpranger Leonard J
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Constant air velocity carburetor
US 2521421 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. J. SPRANGER CONSTANT AIR -vELocITY CARBURETOR Sept. 5, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 12. 1946 w W v n@ ,i

Sept. 5, 1950 l.. J. SPRANGER coNsTANT AIR VELOCITY cARBuRx-:TOR

2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Oct. 12, 1946 :vaghe/7 te rFig; i53is" adetail :in lsectiongfenlarged, I taken on PatentedtSept. 5, 1950 l. j

TES PATENT OFFICE 'oonsfrAN'T AIR VELOCITY' CARBURE'JJORl lLeonard JQISprangenOakParkJl'l. l

u l .application oeiolieiv 12, 1946, serial No. 702,972

` 'l' vv.I6 claims.v (01261-41) -jzlMy-r invention Lrelates; fing certainfnovelfeaturesbywhich fto .produce an an axial opening which extends through an endl effectivefmixture of rfuel'andlai-r for operation rwall 29 'at-the top end of the tube. Thek top end -oi-ianzyinternal'combustion engine? It includes of the truncated cone head projects slightly into inzitsconstruction-:means'zfor:increasingtheratio the mixingchamber -When they plunger is in its .offair :towfuel' with-increase in the'amountof .the uppermost position, the opening around the cone gaseous mixture, thereby conducive to increased then beingv closed. This plunger, vtogether vwith economy. in consumption.i This."isiaccomplished its cooperating seat, forms a choke valve which to :aacarburetor embodythe form of. a truncated cone28 seating within by a* mechanism which ist simple and dependable will be further explained hereinafter. As shown, f

in its operation. This objective of my vinven- 10 the plunger body is polygonal in cross section tion'ias Well asi otherslwhich' Will'fher'einafter apso that vspaces lalong its sides'will remain to proi -pearfmay bei attained bya construction of .which vide apassageway" between the plunger and its -arsuggestivefform isvillustrated rin,` the {accom-l surrounding tube. Ports 30 extend through the pariying:drawings;wherein-a w:

Fig'. 'sia sidepelevation'of'itheLcarhureton I 15 enter therethrough intothe tube.A Ata point Fig; satopiplan-viewzthereofg-' .,.Fig.l.3 is a."verticalgsectiom,taken on line 3-3 wall 3| of the fuel chamber is apertured to re- ,of;-Eig.'2 f t 'ceive'a closure plug 32 whichis maintained inA mig. 4` is a'horizontalsection, takenfon line 4 4 place by a screw threadedv connection. When this ofiig..i3; f i* 20 plug is removed, the tube 2D may be passed end'- line 5--5 of Fig. 3; i .i l permit application of a screw driver wherebyv to Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 3 in which the i rotate the tube eitheryway for purposes of aspartsv-,aregshownas having been| operated to ansembly 'or disassembly with the mixing charnotherposition; i' 25 berwa1l23.

.,;1?ig.' y7 isa 4view in .perspectivejof the vchoke vThe second tube 2l is alsoclosedat the bottom plunger; and 1 .1: z 'l by an end Wall :35 adapted to receive the thrust I\Fig.'.8 is'va perspectileviewizoftheiieedetubev of coiled spring A36 which extends within an leading from thefuel chamber. 1 w y inner tube 31, open at the bottom, but closed AThe ,bodyof the present-carburetoris formed 30 at the top by an end Wall 38 through which is a tovprovide an airzchamber Ain line with a' mixe small'axial opening 39 lying within a cross groove ingchamber M to one 'side of "which is ra' fuel 4D. This inner tube is provided with'a plurality chamber F. The Walls'deningthesethree chamof small portsill` in ystepped formation, close to bers are; suitably,` joined 'torprovide ya :unitary its upper end-and in response tov tension ofthe structure.;` Leading ,into the` iiuel chamber is a 35' springf36 the inner tube is vurged upwardly to vfuelpipe I0, and openingintottheair'chamber project into'the mixing chambergthereby to exis an airt inlet I I. s The;bottomzfofthe*mixing posemore' or less ofits side Wall ports M accordchamber is: open for operative; connection Vwith ing to the distance to which thertube is projected the. intake manifold (n'otshowni" ofzan'internal axially of itself. Near 'the bottom of thexouter combustion engine. l' ,-.frd 40 tub'e2l, I provide side Wall ports l2v through :i'l'heimw of liquid fuelinto'thefuel chamber is which liqudfuel may enter t0 rise' therewthincontrolled by a valve'in the pipe l0. operated bya To facilitate assemblx7 of the tube 2| 'into opel"- float l5 Which'is pivotallysup'ported upon a-bar vlli ative position.' a second closure plug 43, the same to swing u'p or Adowninispcnse' t fliictuatins asl the plus 32, may 4be removably tted in the iri the level of' the fuel wlthin'the chamber. By 45 fuel chamber 'bottom Wa1113l- `The wa11nassases such a conventional means it 'ispo'ss'ibletc keepv wherein the tubes Zrfand 2| are mounted open fs'ub'stntially"constant-level er l ithin the out upon a beveled` seatv 45 which-is extended ^f1@a-mber:atiaH-ifgj f 1 crcularly Within the mixing chamber A valve i1 'TA-'pair ofltubes 20-and'2l'4are extendedobliq'ue; member linithenforrri fof a-fbeveledfdisk 46 is lyfdownwardly ntothei fuels-chamber from .its 50 adapted to fbemoved toward'and' from this seat wall-"22 which is proximatefto 'the miXine'Cham; and ini al1 of'its. positions to be engaged bythe ber'. Eaclifoffthese tubes 'may be secured by'a upper end38 ofthe inner tube .In the lower sbrew'tthreadeuf"connection/within cylindrical part of ltsftmovementrange this dlsk will also passages which-.extend thiougn'thegwall 22y and remain'y in engagement With' the 'end ofthe cone theadjacent wallzBYof thermixingachamber into 55 28 that 1s pr'olected fi-omltheunlunger 21; r .Tins communicationwith theilatterise'e Fig.5).' valvexdisk is carried# by stemflllr Whose lower .zl'h'eitube 2n iSCmSediat;thgbttombyaplug endis slidablyfsupported inA a? tubular guide .48

` {Z5-f against-which isf-'fthrust fthe-lowerlehd .of a which' by apairliofwebs.491is maintained xedly `vcoiled .springzz'tiwhose'upperendresiliently sup- ,y in a Centerpositiorrluarthe-bottom en d of .the 'pori-,sia.ZpmUgepQ-Thahglatl-.fits top fa head in 460 mixing :chambenff Ae'spring.sfwhich 1sA coiled t tube wall near its'lower end to permit fuel to opposite thel lowerl end of the ltube, the bottom wise therethrough. liindv slots 33 in the' tube rIhis disk 55 which occupies an upper positionv relative to the rst valve disk 451 is'beveled on its under face for cooperation with a beveled seat 55 which is extended circularly inwardly from the surrounding walls to provide a'partial separation and line of construction between the mixing chamber M below and the air-"chamberl A above. A limited slip connection between the upper valve disk and the stem is also provided, this taking the form of a cross pin 51 whichf'is carried by one for engagement within a verticaily disposed slot 53 in the other. 1

The tube 54 extends from the upper valve disk upwardly within a cylindrical guide wallfithat depends into the air chamber Afrom .a top-Wall El. This guide wall also rises abovethe top wall to furnish a swiveled mounting 'for Vthe cupped end 55 of a lever whieh'is adapted to be operated by a link connection 57 `from a suitable control (not shown). As Wby l'a set .screwf entered through the cup wall y55 "to'tbear' `with pressure against' thetube 56.4 I provide fortransmitting rotary motion thereto whenever the lever 55 is operated. A screw 'l5 'which issecured to the tube 54 extends laterally thereof to present its head within a spiral cam slet il that is formed in the guide wall- 59 (see Fig. 6), so as to cause the tube 54 to be raised or lowered with each operation of the lever 55. By some such means as this, the upper valve disk 55 is moved toward and from its seat 55, the lower valve disk 45 being also moved in unison therewith. Thefpoint -of minimum clearance between the valve disk. 5-5and and its seat 55 may be determined by a stop 59 thatv is adjustably mounted on the top wall 6l to engage the lever 66 when operated to 'its' limit in a clockwise `direction as viewed in lliig; 2.

To operate the lower valve disk vlll there is slidably positioned through the upper end 'I2 of the tube 54 and axially thereof a pin 'l5 whose lower end is rested upon the top end of the stem 5l. At its `top end this pin is engaged at I5 by one arm of a bell crank lever 11 which is pivoted at 18 to the upper end of a bracket 19 that upstands from the top wall 5| of the air chamber. To the other arm of the bell crank is pivotedy at 8i) an operating rod 8l leading to a suitable control (not shown). By the means just described, I provide for operation of the choke valve through movement imparted to the stem ell whichwhen downwardly moved will advance the lower valve disk 45 against the seat, the slip movement at the pin and slot connection '57 and 58 permitting this disk to reach this position even when the upper vaive disk 55 is slightly separated from its seat. l

In operation, when the lever 65 is moved, the stem 4'! will be lifted to raise the valve disk 46 off of its seat. In this movement the plunger head 28 is permitted to advance outwardly whereby to close the opening through the port 29. Concurrentlythe inner tube 31 advances outwardly to expose additional ports 4i through which liquid fuel is drawn into the mixing chamber. Air entering through the opening Il descends into the mixing chamber since the valve disk 55 is moved further away fromits seat when the lever 6B is operated. Under these conditions, a

4 gaseous mixture is produced which, when admitted into an associated internal combustion engine, will eiectively support continued operation thereof.

Manifestly when the valve disk 46 is moved away from or toward its seat, the amount of fuel admitted into the mixing chamber is increased or decreased, respectively; at the same time the `area of the opening around this valve into the passageway leading to the internal combustion engine is varied, being either increased or decreased as this valve moves away from or toward its seat. In these operations there is a constant iniiow of air through the port ll, passing around the valve disk 55, to enter into the mixing chamber. This inflow varies with the amount of fuel admitted into the mixing chamber since the two valve disks 55 and 46 operate in unison in their movements toward and from their respective seats. There is accordingly maintained through the carburetor an air 4movement of constant velocity.

For cold starting, when priming is needed, operation of the control rod 8l will produce. a down movement on the stem 41. This will advance both valve disks toward their seats, with a slightv overmovement of the valve disk46 whereby to assure that the plunger head 28 is depressed .below its normal up position.v By this operation, fuel passing around .the plunger is' admitted through the port 29` into the-'mixing Ichamber while inflow of air is greatly reduced through maintaining the valve disk 55 in a nearlyclosed position. A very rich mixture,` such as is `required under cold starting conditions, ,may laccordingly be produced by the manipulation just described. 'l

I claim:

l. A carburetor in which is comprised a fuel chamber and a mixing chamber,theflatter'having aseat with a valve movable toward and-from the same, a passageway extending betweenfthe fuel and-mixing chambers and opening out'upon the valve seat of the latter, and a" tube slidably fitted within the passageway and tension-urged endwise'therein toward the valve whereby one end portion of the tube normally remains pro# jected into the mixing chamber a distance equal tothe space between the valve and its seat, and a plurality of ports extended through the tube walls at points lengthwise thereof proximate to its projected end whereby to openup communi# cation in varying degrees between the fuel and mixing chambers according Ito the distancerof separation between the valve and 'its seat,"the inner end portion of the ltube being extensible into the fuel chamber, and said innerendportion being open at the bottom and in communication with the fuel chamber, saidtube'forming a passage for fuel from its bottom to .the upper part thereof.

2. A carburetor in `which is comprised a .ifuel chamber and a mixing chamber, the Vlatter having a seat with a valve movable toward and from the same, a passageway extending-between the 'fuel and mixing chambers and opening out upon `the valve seat of the latter, and a tube'slidably tted within the passageway and tension-urged endwise therein toward the valve whereby onevend portion of the tube normallyremains projected into the mixing chamber a distance equal tothe space between the valve and its seat, the inner end portion of the 'tube'being extensibleintothe fuel chamben-and said'innerpend portion being open at the .bottom and in communicationvwith thefue/lchamber, said tube forming a passage for fuel-from its bottom to the upper part thereof,

and a plurality of ports extended through `the tube walls at points proximate to but progressively spaced from its projected end whereby to open up communication in varying degrees between the fuel and mixing chambers according to the distance of separation between the valve and its seat.

3. A carburetor in which is comprised a fuel chamber and a mixing chamber, the latter having a seat with a valve movable toward and from the same, two passageways extending between the fuel and mixing chambers and both opening out upon the valve seat of the latter, a tube slidably fitted in one passageway andtension-urged endwise therein toward 'the Valve whereby one end portion of the tube normally remains projected into the mixing chamber a distance equal to the space between the valve and its seat, the

other end of the slidable tube being extensible into the fuel chamber, a plurality of ports exe tended through the tube walls at points lengthwise thereof proximate toits projected endvwhereby to open up communication in varying degrees between the fuel and mixing chambers according tor the distance of separation between the valve and its seat, and a device within the sec-v ond passageway tension-urged toward the valve for engagement therewithwhen the latter is close to its seat and disengageable therefrom and closing said second passage when the valve is remote from its seat, the valve when positioned close to its seat acting to close 01T the mixing chamber more or less against the passage of air there- 'through and concurrently depress the device to admit fuel therearound through the second pas- 'ably tted in one passageway and tension-urged endwise rtherein towards the valve whereby one end portion of the tubenormally remains projected into the mixing chamber a distance equal to the space between' the valve and its seat, the other end of the slidable tube being extensible into the fuel chambenxa plurality of ports extending through the tube walls at points lengthwise thereof proximate to its projected end whereby to open up communication in varying degrees between the fuel and mixing chambers according to the distance of separation between the valve and its seat, a device within the second passageway tension-urged towards the valve for engagement therewith when the latter is close to its seat and disengageable therefrom and closing said second passageway when the valve is remote from its seat, the valve when positioned close to its seat acting to close off 'the mixing chamber more or less against the passage of air therethrough and concurrently depress the device to admit fuel therearound through the second passageway and into the mixing chamber 'when the valve is spaced slightly from its seat,

an air chamber inv communication with the mixing chamberand provided with a valve seat, a

' valve in the air chamber movable toward and sagewayinto the mixing chamber when the valve vis slightly spaced from its seat.

4. A carburetor in which is combined a fuel chamber and a mixing chamber, the latter having a seat with a valve movable toward and from the same, a lpassageway extending between the fuel and mixing chambers and opening out upon the valve seat of the latter, a tube slidably tted within the passageway and tension-urged endwise therein towards the valve whereby one end portion of the tube normally remains projected into the mixing chamber a distance equal to the space between the valve and its seat, the other from its seat, and a common operating stem for the valvesin the mixing |and' air chambers whereby to provide for operation thereof in unison.

6. A carburetor in which is comprised a fuel chamber and a mixing chamber, the latter lhaving a circular seat with a disc Valve movable rectilinearly toward and from the same, a passageway extending between the fuel and mixing chambers and opening out upon the. valve seat of the latter, and a tube slidably tted within the passageway and tension-urged' endwise f therein toward the Valve whereby one end porend of the sndabie tube being extensible into the fuel chamber, a plurality of ports extended through v,the tube walls at points lengthwise thereof proximate toits projected end whereby to open -upv communication in varying degrees betion ofthe tube normally remains `projected into the mixing chamber a distance equal to the space between the valveand its seat, and a plurality of ports extended through the tube walls at points lengthwise thereof proximate to its projected end whereby to open up communication in varying degrees between the fuel and mixing chambers according to the distance of separation between the valve and its seat. 1

LEONARD. SPRANGERf;

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the raie' of` this patent:

tween the fuel and mixing chambers according to the distance of separation between the valve and its seat, an air chamber in communication with the mixing chamber and partially separated therefrom by a constriction providing a valve seat, a valve in the air chamber movable toward and from its seat, and a common operating stem for the valves in the mixing and air chambers y fwhereby to yprovide for operation thereof in unison.

5. A carburetor in which iscombined'a, fuel chamberand a mixing chamber, the latter having a seat with a valve'movable toward and from the same, two passageways extending between the fuel and mixing chambers and both opening out upon the valve seat of the latter, a tube slid- 424,584 Greatk Britain Feb. 25, 1935

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US978947 *Sep 25, 1909Dec 20, 1910Gavin RaeCarbureter.
US1213807 *May 4, 1914Jan 23, 1917Master Carburetor CorpCarbureter.
US1269176 *Aug 6, 1917Jun 11, 1918Pierre P GillesCarbureter.
US1337051 *Dec 29, 1917Apr 13, 1920Julius WinterCarbureter
US2125538 *Dec 21, 1933Aug 2, 1938Carter Carburetor CorpControl lever
US2150081 *Jun 24, 1936Mar 7, 1939Ignaz SchorschCarburetor for internal combustion engines
US2166899 *Jul 6, 1936Jul 18, 1939Carter Carburetor CorpCarburetor structure
US2198676 *Apr 28, 1938Apr 30, 1940Marion MalloryCarburetor
US2407534 *Apr 27, 1943Sep 10, 1946Carter Carburetor CorpCarburetor
GB424584A * Title not available
GB190721457A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2643865 *Aug 23, 1950Jun 30, 1953Amal LtdCarburetor for internal-combustion engines
US8048163 *Aug 22, 2005Nov 1, 2011Zimmer, Inc.Knee arthroplasty prosthesis
US8092545Aug 22, 2005Jan 10, 2012Zimmer, Inc.Knee arthroplasty prosthesis method
US8092546Aug 22, 2005Jan 10, 2012Zimmer, Inc.Knee arthroplasty prosthesis
Classifications
U.S. Classification261/41.1, 261/44.5, 261/52
International ClassificationF02M9/133, F02M9/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M9/133
European ClassificationF02M9/133