Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2523588 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateSep 26, 1950
Filing dateFeb 24, 1948
Priority dateFeb 24, 1948
Publication numberUS 2523588 A, US 2523588A, US-A-2523588, US2523588 A, US2523588A
InventorsOrmsby Charles F
Original AssigneeOrmsby Charles F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Screw type oil pump
US 2523588 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Sept. 26, 1950 2,523,588

C. F- ORMSBY SCREW TYPE OIL PUMP Filed Feb. 24, 1948 Fig.3. um! 22 25 6 M O a I 5 I vs Charles E Ormsb INVENTO (Wavy ZY% Patented Sept. 26, 1950 SCREW TYPE OIL PUMP Charles Faorm sby, Kokomo, Ind. 7 Application February 24, 1948, Serial No. 10,342

3 Claims.

The present invention relates to a rotary screwtype fluid pump which is especially, but not necessarily, adapted to handle, oil and the principal purpose of the invention is to structurally, functionally and otherwise improve upon pumps, of a similar type, in the same category of invention, the construction employed being possessed of appreciable refinements and improvements and being of the utmost in simplicity of construction.

Pumps in the field of endeavor under advisement, the types bestknownto me, are comparatively complicated and are constructed from fourteen or more parts, all requiring precision machining and careful assembling and adjustment to insure efiflciency of operation. By contrast,

the improved pump constituting the subject matter of the instant matter, is made up of a minimum of parts, principally three major parts, which are die cast, and consequently, it is ofoutstanding simplicity 'of construction and because of this, highly desirable for manufacturers and users alike.

Another and equally important object of the invention is to provide an oil pump characterized by a simple housing which encasesa positively adjustable insert serving as a bushing and bearing for the rotary impeller, said insert being effectively adjustable to regulate and vary the pressure and speed of flow of the oil, whereby to adapt same to efficient handling of oils of different grades and fluidities.

Another object of the invention is to provide a pump of the form under consideration which, because of its principle of operation, is adaptable to many uses, without modifying the principles and by merely providing, on the casing or housing, necessary attaching devices and mountings.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will become more readily apparent from the following description and the accompanying illustrative drawings.

In the drawings:

Figure 1 is an elevational view of a rotary screw-type oil pump constructed in accordance with the principles of the instant invention;

and this is closed at its bottom, as at 6, and is interiorly provided with a smooth walled cylindrical chamber. At the upper end it is internally screwthreaded. At one side, as shown in Figure 3, is the oil inlet 1 and an associated screw-threaded nipple or neck 8, to accommodate the supply pipe (not shown). On a diametrically opposite side and near the top is an outlet 9, this having a screw-threaded neck it to accommodate the discharge pipe (not shown). In line with the outlet, the wall of the cylinder is provided with an annular adapter channel I I and just above this, a shallow groove is provided to accommodate a packing ring l2. Located in the bottom of the chamber is an end thrust bearing I3. I

The rotary impeller, which is driven by a suitable source of power (not shown) is denoted by the numeral l4 and comprises a shaft l5 with tapered helicoid oil feeding and compressing threads [6. The lower inner end of the shaft is reduced and shouldered as at IT, where it is mounted in end-thrust relation on the end-thrust bearing [3.

The aforementioned insert is denoted by the numeral l8 and this comprises a sleeve whose major portion I9 is fitted for operation in the cylinder or chamber in the casing. The cylindrical portion of the bore constitutes a bearing for the shaft and the enlarged counterbore 20 provides an oil pocketing chamber, of general frusto-conical design, for the oil. The taper of the chamber 20 is precision made for adjustable coacting relation with the somewhat correspondingly tapered threads IS. The intermediate or body portion of the sleeve is screw-threaded, as at 2 l, and is screwed'into the threads of the casing 5. The protruding outer end of the sleeve is of flat faced form and provides a tool-nut as at 22. That portion of the bore which accommodates and provides a bearing for the shaft l5 is also provided with suitable packing and sealing means 23. The numeral 24 designates a port which is formed in the chamber portion of the sleeve and which is cooperable with the adapter channel H and also the outlet 9. A set screw is denoted at 25, and a lock nut at 26, and the set screw serves to facilitate maintenance of the sleeve in an adjusted position.

In practice, the oil enters the inlet 1 and flows into the cylindrical chamber of the casing and then into the pocketing chamber 20, where it is trapped and pressured under the action of the rotating threads !6 of the impeller. It is discharged through the port 24 into the channel H and from the channel discharged through the outlet 9, this as is obvious from the drawing. Since the port 24 is registrable with the channel and the channel runs entirely around the housing, there is no necessity to match the port 24 with the outlet 9. Also, this arrangement, the port 24, channel I l and port 9, provides for proper discharging notwithstanding the adjustment of the sleeve l 9 in relation to the casing. By turning the tool nut 22 and adjusting the insert l8 in relation to the casing, the tapers of the chamber wall and peripheral portion of the threads l6 may be varied in relation to each other to vary the pressure and speed of flow of the liquid passing through the pump.

Assembly is accomplished by placing the impeller in the housing and then placing the insert It in the housing and screwing same into place.

Disassembling is accomplished by the reverse procedure.

As before mentioned, this pump is designed with a minimum of parts and of necessity, ma- 1 chining of these parts. Its principal feature is that it is adjustable, whereby to vary pressure and speed flow and making it possible to regulate the pressure and speed of flow to accommodate various grades and viscosities of oils being pumped.

A careful consideration of the foregoing description in conjunction with the invention as illustrated in the drawings will enable the reader to obtain a clear understanding and impression of the alleged features of merit and novelty sufficient to clarify the construction of the invention as hereinafter claimed.

Minor changes in shape, size, materials and rearrangement of parts may be resorted to in actual practice so long as no departure is made from the invention as claimed.

Having described the invention, what is claimed as new is:

1. A rotar screw-type pump of the class described comprising a casing, said casing being closed at one-end, open and screw-threaded at an opposite end, provided interiorly with a cylindrical chamber and provided with an inlet and an outlet, a screw-threaded insert screwed into the screw-threaded end of said casing, said insert being in the form of a sleeve and the major portion thereof fitting telescopically into said cylindrical chamber, the bore of said sleeve constituting a bearing and a portion thereof being enlarged and of frusto-conical form and providing a chamber in communication with the'firstnamed chamber, said sleeve having an outlet registering with the frusto-conical chamber and also with the first-named outlet, an end-thrust hearing mounted in said cylindrical chamber, an impeller having a shaft, the inner end of the shaft being mounted for cooperation in said end-thrust bearing, the opposite end-portion being mounted in the bearing provided by said sleeve, that por- 4 tion of the impeller in said chambers having a helical and tapered thread, the taper of the threads coinciding with the taper of the frustoconical chamber, whereby the screw-threaded connection between the sleeve and easing permits the frusto-conical chamber to be adjusted in relation to said threads and to obtain variable pressures and to regulate the speed of flow of oil through the pump.

2. A rotary screw-type pump of the class described comprising a casing, said casing being closed at one end, open and screw-threaded at an opposite end, provided interiorly with a cylindrical chamber and provided with an inlet and an outlet, a screw-threaded insert screwed into the screw-threaded end of said casing, said insert being in the form of a sleeve and the major portion thereof fitting telescopically into said cylindrical chamber, the bore of said sleeve constituting a bearing and a portion thereof being enlarged and of frusto-conical form and providing a chamber in communication with the firstnamed chamber, said sleeve having an outlet registrable with the frusto-conical chamber and also with the first-named outlet, an end-thrust bearing in said cylindrical chamber, an impeller having a shaft, the inner end of the shaft being mounted for cooperation in said end-thrust bearing, the opposite end-portion being mounted in the bearing provided by said sleeve, that portion of the impeller in said chambers having a helical and tapered thread, the taper of the threads coinciding with the taper of the frusto-conical chamber, said casing having an internal endless groove communicating with the cylindrical chamber and also with the outlet, and the outlet in said sleeve being registrable with said groove.

3. The structure specified in claim 2, the outer end portion of said sleeve being provided with tool nut.

CHARLES F. ORMSBY.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,494,614 McLean May 20, 1924 1,701,103 Egy Feb. 5, 1929 1,871,872 Baur Aug. 16, 1932 2,025,084 Bergstrom Dec. 24, 1935 2,094,171 Hofier Sept. 28, 1937 2,362,922 Palm Nov. 14, 1944 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 441,873 Great Britain Jan. 27, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1494614 *Sep 5, 1922May 20, 1924Peter McleanRotary pump
US1701103 *Feb 14, 1927Feb 5, 1929Egy George CRotary pump
US1871872 *Oct 24, 1929Aug 16, 1932Bosch RobertOil pump
US2025084 *Mar 28, 1935Dec 24, 1935Bergstrom Adolph GRotary pump
US2094171 *May 1, 1933Sep 28, 1937Ex Cell O CorpTransfer fuel pump
US2362922 *Oct 16, 1942Nov 14, 1944Stewart Warner CorpRotary pump
GB441873A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3951576 *Sep 23, 1974Apr 20, 1976Lofquist Jr Alden ARotary diaphragm pump
US7404293Jul 21, 2005Jul 29, 2008Yamaha Marine Kabushiki KaishaIntake system for supercharged engine
US7458369 *Sep 14, 2005Dec 2, 2008Yamaha Marine Kabushiki KaishaSupercharger lubrication structure
US7458868Aug 29, 2006Dec 2, 2008Yamaha Marine Kabushiki KaishaSmall planing boat
US8091534Sep 26, 2006Jan 10, 2012Yamaha Hatsudoki Kabushiki KaishaInstallation structure for compressor
EP0445046A1 *Feb 12, 1991Sep 4, 1991ChimiotechnicRotary screw pump, motor-pump, reservoir and machine equipped with such a pump
Classifications
U.S. Classification415/72, 415/128
International ClassificationF04D3/02, F04D3/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04D3/02
European ClassificationF04D3/02