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Publication numberUS2524720 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 3, 1950
Filing dateJul 24, 1946
Priority dateJul 24, 1946
Publication numberUS 2524720 A, US 2524720A, US-A-2524720, US2524720 A, US2524720A
InventorsWatrous Charles A
Original AssigneeWatrous Charles A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Eye-bathing device
US 2524720 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 3, 1950 c. A. WATROUS EYE-BATHING DEVICE Filed July 24, 1946 Patented Oct. 3, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE EYE-BATHING DEVICE Charles A. Watrous, New Haven, Conn.

Application July 24, 1946, Serial No. 685,874

6 Claims. (Cl. 128-249) The present invention relates in general to means for treating the eye and more particularly to an improved device for bathing the orbital-cavity or elements of the eye within the orbital-cavity.

Devices which have heretofore been used for applying a medicament to the eye or for washing the eye have, for the most part, consisted of douche cups adapted to be filled with a liquid which is applied directly to the eye by throwing back ones head; or devices having a syringe associated therewith for directing a jet of liquid against the ball of the eye.

An object of the present invention is to provide an improved device for applying an eye-treating medium to the eye.

A further object of the invention is to provide an eye-bathing device with improved means for applying an aerified fluid to the eye.

A still further object of the invention is to provide an improved eyecup adapted to be applied over the orbital cavity, and having atomizer means cooperatively associated therewith for bathing the eye with spray or foam.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a highly-efficient, simple and economical device of the class described embodying fluidnebulizing means in conjunction with other elements, to permit treatment of the eyes and orbital cavity without causing strain on th muscles of the patients neck and similar inconveniences which usually accompany the treatment of eyes with the ordinary type of eyecup.

With the above and other objects in view, as will appear to those skilled in the art from the present disclosure, this invention includes all features in the said disclosure which are novel over the prior art.

In the accompanying drawings, in which cer tain modes of carrying out the present invention are shown for illustrative purposes:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of the improved eyetreating means of this invention;

Fig. 2 is a front elevation of the eye-treating means shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a top plan View of the eye-treating means shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a sectional elevation on line il of Fig. 1; and

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the atomizervalve of the eye-treating means.

In its broadest aspects, the invention comprehends eye-treating means characterized by an improved device for introducing a medicinal powder or aerified medicament such as, for example, a liquid mist or foam into the orbital cavity and is embodied in a structure which, for the purpose of illustration, comprises, a cupelement cooperatively associated with atomizingmeans and hereinafter referred to as an atom-' izer-eyecup.

. Referring to the drawings, the cup-element, indicated generally at H], may consist of glass, a molded plastic such, for example, as a phenolic material, a methyl-methacrylate resin, or other equivalent material, and comprises a substantially-semi-ellipsoidal cup ll provided with a central-cavity l2 open at its upper end, the inside wall l3 of the cavity l2 being substantially-semiellipsoidal in shape, as seen in Fig. 3, and blending at its upper edge into the outer walls of the cup I l by a radius to form a smooth rounded rim l5 adapted, when applied to the eye, to fit comfortably around the orbital cavity. The walls of the cup II are of substantially uniform thickness throughout except at one end of the major axis M of the ellipsodial-shaped cup. Here the thickness of the wall is increased by an inwardly-projecting protuberance indicated generally at Hi, the profile of which is substantially-knee-shaped, as shown in Figs. 2 and 4, and smoothly blended into the inner wall l3 of the cup. The cap or cap-portion ll of the knee i6 is located in the lower half of the cavity l 2, while a line Z, perpendicular to the tangent of the cap H, is disposed in angular relationship to the major axis Mof the ellipsoid. Referring to Fig. 3, in the present embodiment, the angle between the major axis- M of the ellipsoidal cup and the line Z is substantially 6 and may be more or less than 6, as long as the particular angle chosen maintains the salient features of the invention, Referring to Figs. 3 and 4, a longitudinal aperture l8 extends through the wall of the cup at the knee-portion l5 thereof, the longitudinal axis of the aperture It being substantially coincident with the line Z and having a slight-upward tilt, as. shown in Fig. l, for the purpose hereinafter described. The forward end of the aperture l8 is reduced in cross section by a conically-tapered bore is which intersects the cap H in a relatively-small orifice 28. The rear end of the longitudinal aperture I8 is enlarged in diameter to provide a chamber 2i hereinafter referred to as'the medicament-chamber which has a counterbore 22 at its rear end provided with internal threads 23. The rear or outer extremity of the internally-threaded counterbore 22 is provided with a smooth-walled counterbore 24, hereinafter referred to as the air-chamber. Adapted to be secured in the threaded counterbore 22 is an atomizer-valve indicated generally at 25 in Fig. 5, comprising a head-portion 26, the perimeter of which may b cylindrical or hexagonal as desired; and an externally-threaded shanl-2- portion 27 which is adapted to be threadedly engaged with the threads 23 of the counterbore 22.

Extending from the shank-portion 2'! of the atomizer-valve and coextensive with the longitudinal axis thereof, is the nozzle 28 of the valve which, as shown in Fig. 4:, comprises a tubular member substantially equal in diameter to the diameter of the aperture 88 and mounted at its rear end with a sliding friction fit in a longitudinal aperture 29 of the shank 2! of the valve for the purpose hereinafter described. The rear end 30 of the nozzle 28 is normally spaced forwardly of the closed end of the aperture 29 to form a chamber 3! into which air is adapted to be delivered from an aperture 32 which intersects the wall of the aperture 29 and extends radially and at substantially right angles thereto through the wall of the shank 21 of the valve, for the purpose hereinafter described. Although the valve-nozzle 28 is shown as a separate element, it will be understood that the latter may be formed as an integral part of the shank-portion 2'! of the atomizer-valve. A longitudinal fiat 33 is provided along the nozzl from a point thereon slightly forwardl of the face 34 of the shank 21 to the forward end of the nozzle, so that when the valve 25 is assembled in the apertured protuberance it of the cup, a relief-recess 35 will be provided between the substantially-cylindrical wall of the aperture l8 and the fiat 33 of the valve-nozzle. The forward extremity of the valve-nozzle is provided with a substantially-conical point 36, the taper of which, as indicated in Fig. 4, corresponds substantially to the conical bore I9 of the aperture [8 in the protuberance N5 of the cup. Although one fiat 33 provides a satisfactory relief-recess, it is to be understood that more than one flat or its equivalent may be used.

Thus, when the valve 25 is threadedly mounted in the counterbore 22 in the protuberance l6, its head 26 is adapted to seal the outer end of the air-chamber 24, at which time the conicallytapered end 36 of the nozzle is spaced an extremely-slight normally-predetermined distance from the adjacent conically-tapered bore l9 of the aperture l8 so as to form a relatively-narrow substantially-conical inwardly-diverging passage 31 therebetween. Since it may be desirable to vary the fineness of the atomized fluid issuing from the orifice 20, the nozzle 28 is mounted with a longitudinal sliding friction fit in the shankportion of the atomizer-valve, as described above, as a consequenc of which the comically-tapered end of the nozzle may be adjusted at varying distances from the sonically-tapered bore l9 of the aperture it. In the event the nozzle 28 is formed as an integral part of the valve, then it is within the purview of the invention to provide a resilient washer (not shown) between the head 26 of the valve and the adjacent wall of the cup, to permit adjustments to be made in the size of the passage 31, at the same time maintaining the outer end of the air-chamber 24 closed.

In its assembled position in the cup-wall, the

v outer end of the radial aperture 32 of the valve lies substantially opposite the air-chamber 24 into which air is adapted to be lead by means of a passage 38, the upper end of which intersects the wall of the air-chamber 24; and which extends downwardly through the wall of the eyecup to a point at the rear thereof substantially opposite the corresponding end of the minor axis m of the cup ellipse. At this point, the lower end of the passage 38 intersects a passage 39 which coincides with the longitudinal axis of a shoulder 40 (see Fig. 1) protruding rearwardly and downwardly from the base-portion 4| of the cup I l. Formed integrally with or otherwise secured to the lower end of the shoulder 49 is a nipple 42 to which an air-bulb 43 is adapted to be secured. It will be clear that by squeezing the bulb 43, air may be forced up through the passages 39 and 38 into the air-chamber 24 and from thence through the radial passage 32 of the valve into the axial passage 44 of the valve-nozzl 23, the outer end of which is disposed substantially opposite the orifice 29 in the cap ll of the cup. Although an air-bulb 43' provides suitable means for forcing air through the aforesaid passages of the cup, it is to be understood that air may be supplied by any other equivalent air-compressing device, which may be attached, for example, by an air-hose to the nipple 42. Intersecting th wall of the fluidchamber 2| in the protuberance [6 of the cup is a passage 45 which extends downwardly through the wall of the cup into the base-portion 4| thereof. The base-portion 4| of the cup I I is an integral part thereof, being blended to the underside of the cup I l by a neck-portion 46 of reduced diameter, to facilitate holding the cup. The periphery of the base GI is substantially cylindrical and has in its bottom an upwardly-extending substantially-cylindrical aperture 41, the walls of which are provided with relatively-coarse threads 4-8. Intersecting the upper closed end 49 of the aperture 4? is an internally-threaded aperture 50, the longitudinal axis of which is in alignment with the longitudical axis of the passage 45, the lower end of the latter terminating in the upper end of the aperture 59. The diameter of the latter is greater than the diameter of the passage 45 and is adapted to receive the upper externallythreaded end of a tube 5| which is threadedly secured therein. The lower end of the tube 5! extends downwardly and terminates immediately adjacent the bottom of a. suitable container 52 for holding the fluid or other medicament to be used in treating the eye. The container may comprise a glass bottle or equivalent means which is provided at its upper end with a neck 53 having external threads adapted to threadedly engage the internal threads 48 of the aperture 4'! in the base 4! of the cup. A washer 54 is shown between the end wall 49 of the base 4| and the neck 53 of the bottle to provide a tight joint therebetween. As shown in Fig. 4, the bottle is adapted to be vented by means of a passage 55, the upper end of which is opened to the atmosphere adjacent the neckportion 46 of the cup, the lower end of the passage 55 intersecting the end wall 49 of the base 4! opposite the upper open end of the bottle 52. The specific location of the passage 55 is not critical, however, and is preferably located where it will be least likely to be inadvertently closed when using the cup.

From the foregoing description, it will be clear that when the bulb 43 issqueezed, air will be forced up into the axial aperture 44 of the nozzle 28 and out the forward end thereof, as described above, thereby creating an aspirating eiiect within the chamber 2| sufiicient to cause a fluid medicament within the bottle 52 to move upwardly through the tube 5! and passage 45 into the chamber 2i and from thence through the reliefrecess 35 into the extremely-narrow substantially-conical passage 31 between the conical end 36 of the valve-nozzle and the conically-tapered bore I9 of the aperture l8. As a consequence, the liquid will issue from the orifice in a substantially-atomized condition, that is to say, in the form of finely-divided particles. As pointed out above, the atomizer-valve and orifice 20 from which the spray issues, are located substantially at one end of the major axis M, of the cup-ellipseasa consequence of whichthe spray issuing from the orifice 20 is directed across the cup so as not to impinge directly upon the eyeball and the other highly-sensitive membranes of the orbital cavity. It is to be understood, however, that the same advantages would result by locating the orifice 20 of the atomizer-valve at one end of the minor axis m of the cup-ellipse, or at any point intermediate the extremities of the ellipse axes so long as the spray or other atomized medium issuing from the orifice, is directed across the cup in a plane substantially'parallel to the plane of the major and minor axes of the cup-ellipse. As a consequence, the minute particles of the spray travel transversely across the open end of the cup before impinging against the opposite wall thereof, and hence the heavier particles of spray will drop to the bottom of the eyecup before reaching the opposite wall or wall of impingement, thus separating out the heavy from the fine particles and providing a substantiallynebulized mist within the upper part of the cup. Moreover, the extremely-fine highly-aerified or nebulized particles which do impinge against the wall of the cup substantially opposite the orifice 20, do so at an angle to the wall of impingement because of the angular disposition of the valvenozzle 28', as described above, and hence are in-.

duced both by the slope of the surface of the wall of impingement and the concomitant air issuing from the orifice 2!! to rotate or swirl around the inside wall l3 of the cup. Although the angular disposition of the valve-nozzle with respect to the major axis M of the cup is a preferred construction for inducing the swirling action of the atomized medium, it is to be understood that substantially the same effect may be accomplished by arranging the valve-nozzle 23 substantially parallel to the major axis but offset laterally therefrom; and that any other arrangement of the valve-nozzle 28 may be used as long as the spray or medium issuing from the orifice 20 is induced, when striking the wall of impingement of the cup, to rotate or swirl around the inside wall thereof. The slight upward tilt of the valvenozzle also serves to enhance the turbulent swirling motion of the nebulized mist.

Assuming the eyecup is held over the orbital cavity, as the operator continues to squeeze the bulb 43, the eyecup I I becomes quickly filled with the fine swirling body of nebulized fluid or mist which provides an ideal bathing medium for treating the highly-sensitive membranes, eyesocket and eyeball of the eye. Since the upper rim l5 of the cup H is shaped to fit closely around the orbital cavity, it is desirable to provide venting-means in the cup II to preclude building up undesirable pressure within the cup during its use. To this end, the cup is provided with a vent 56 in the wall thereof which, in the construction shown, is adjacent the head 26 of the atomizer-valve 25, as shown in Figs. 1 and 3, the location of the vent 56 being such as to prevent accidental occlusion of the vent when using the cup. It is to be understood, however, that one or more vents may be used and that the loca tion of the vent 56 may be other than that shown so long as it is not in the wall of impingement of the cup, that is to say, directly opposite the orifice 20 from which the spray issues. Moreover, it should be pointed out that in providing the escape-port adjacent the atomizer-orifice 20, the release of pressure within the cup will, of necessity, augment the swirling motion of the nebulized fluid within the cup.

The atomizer eyecup thus provides improved means for bathing the eye with a medium which is not directed at the highly-sensitive organs of vision and which is preferably in an extremelyfinely-divided highly-aerified state. This mistlike eye-treating medium wholly eliminates the discomfitures and shock which usually, accompany the use of the ordinary liquid-douche eyecup. Furthermore, the eye-treating medium, be it a water mist or a suitable atomized medicament, has imparted thereto a turbulent swirling motion which is extremely beneficial and effective for bathing all areas of the eye and, although the device is especially adapted for bathing the orbital-cavity in a swirling fiuid mist, it is within the purview of this invention to use'other eyetreating mediums such, for example, as a sulfacompound dusting powder for treating an infected orbital cavity and the like. Finally, the device is designed so that it may be conveniently operated by one hand, if necessary, and so as to be operable without bending back the head, thus facilitating the removal of foreign bodies from the eye and precluding the discomfitures and waste attending the use of conventional eyecups.

The invention may be carried out in other specific ways than'those herein set forth without departing from the spirit and essential characteristics of the invention, and the present embodiments are, therefore, to be considered in all respects as illustrative and not restrictive, and all changes coming within the meaning and equivalency range of the appended claims are intended to be embraced therein.

I claim:

1. An eye-treating device comprising a cup element for enclosing the orbital cavity; and atomizer-means cooperatively associated with said cup-element and characterized by a valvenozzle adjustably mounted in one wall of said cup-element and arranged to spray an atomized fluid of variable fineness into said cup-element and to direct said atomized fluid across said cupelement against the opposite wall thereof and at an angle, tangential to said opposite wall thereof so as to provide a swirling body of mist in said cup-element for bathing said orbital cavity.

2. An eye-treating device comprising a cupelement for enclosing the orbital cavity, said cupelement having atomizer-means comprising an air-chamber and a medicament-chamber formed in a wall thereof and a valve-member interconnecting said air-chamber and saidmedicamentchamber; air-supplying means secured to said cup-element for supplying air to said air-chamcup-element having atomizer-,means comprising an air-chamber and a medicament-chamber formed in a wall thereof and a valve-member interconnecting said air-chamber and said medicament-chamber; air-supplying means secured to said cup-element for supplying air to said airchamber; a medicament-container attached to said cup-element for supplying a medicament to said medicament-chamber; passages in the wall of said cup-element joining said air-chamber and said medicament-chamber to said air-supply means and said medicament-container respectively, said valve'member being arranged to mix the air and medicament of said interconnected chambers so as to deliver an aerified medicament into said cup-element for bathing said orbital cavity; and means to adjust said valve-member to vary the fineness of the aerified medicament being delivered into said cupelement.

1. An eye-treating device comprising a cupelement for enclosing the orbital cavity, said cupelement having atomizer-means comprising an air-chamber and a medicament-chamber formed in a Wall thereof and a valve-member having a shank-portion threadedly engaged in the said airchamber and a nozzle arranged to project into said medicament-chamber and to interconnect the latter with said air-chamber; an air-bulb secured to said cup-element for supplying air to said air-chamber; a medicament-container at-. tached to said cup-element for supplying a medicament to said medicament-chamber;and passages in the wall of said cup-element joining said air-chamber and said medicament-chamber to said air-bulb and said medicament-container respectively, said valve-member being arranged to mix the air and medicament of said intercom-1 nected chambers so as to deliver an aerified medicament to said cup-element for bathing said orbital cavity.

5. An eye-treating device comprising a cupelement for enclosing the orbital cavity, said cupelement having atomizer-means comprising an air-chamber and a medicament-chamber formed in a wall thereof and a valve-member having a shank-portion threadedly engaged in the said airchamber and a nozzle arranged to project into said medicament-chamber and to interconnect the latter with said air-chamber; an air-bulb secured to said cup-element for supplying air to said air.chamber; a medicament-container attached to said cup-element for supplying a medicament to said medicament-chamber; passages in-the Wall of said cup-element joining said airchamber and said medicament-chamber to said air-bulb and said medicament-container respectively, said valve-member being arranged to mix the air and medicament of said interconnected.

chambers so as to deliver an aerified medicament to said cup-element for bathing said orbital cavity, the said nozzle of said valve-member having an adjustable connection with the said shank-. portion thereof thereby to vary the fineness of the aerified medicament being delivered into said cup-element.

6. An eye-treating device comprising a cup-element for enclosing the orbital cavity, said cupelement having atomizer-means comprising an air-chamber and a medicament-chamber formed in a Wall thereof and a valve-member having a shank-portion threadedly engaged in the said air-chamber and a nozzle arranged to project into said medicament-chamber and to interconnect the latter with said air-chamber; an air-bulb secured to said cup-element for supplying air to said air-chamber; a medicament-container at-- tached to said cup-element for supplying a medic-,

ament to said medicament-chamber; passages in the wall of said cup-element joining said air. chamber and said medicament-chamber to said air-bulb and said medicament-container respectively, said valve-member being arranged to mix the air and medicament of said interconnected chambers so as to deliver an aerified medicament to said cupelement for bathing said orbital cavity, the said nozzle of said valvemember being disposed at an acute angle to the major axis of said cup-element so as to direct an aerified medicament across said cup-element against and at an obtuse angle to the Wall of said cup-element opposite said nozzle so as to provide a swirling body of aerified medicament in said cup-element for bathing said orbital cavity, said nozzle having an adjustable connection with the said shankportion of said valve-member thereby to vary the fineness of the aerified medicament.

CHARLES A. WATROUS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,121,667 Ross Dec. 22, 1914 1,362,682 Dayton Dec. 21, 1920 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 10,377 Great Britain 1888 295,162 Germany Nov. 11, 1916 190,022 Great Britain Dec. 14, 1922 764,728 France May 26, 1934 113.476 Australia July 24, 1941

Patent Citations
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US1362682 *Dec 14, 1916Dec 21, 1920Dayton Frank EApparatus for eye treatment
AU113476B * Title not available
DE295162C * Title not available
FR764728A * Title not available
GB190022A * Title not available
GB188810377A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2589178 *Nov 15, 1949Mar 11, 1952Wintle Jr Harry DMedicament applicator
US2633122 *Jun 24, 1949Mar 31, 1953Vannas Mauno VOphthalmoscope
US3261355 *Mar 11, 1964Jul 19, 1966Henry BurbigAerated eye cup with air storage vessel
US3409009 *Sep 5, 1967Nov 5, 1968John G. VasseLiquid dispensing container
US4131115 *Oct 17, 1977Dec 26, 1978Peng Sung SEyelids-turning and eye-washing fixture
US4679551 *Feb 22, 1985Jul 14, 1987Tomtec, N.V.Device for performing therapeutic treatments
US4798599 *Jan 3, 1984Jan 17, 1989George ThomasEye washing method and apparatus
US5201726 *Jun 23, 1989Apr 13, 1993Hans RohlEye-bathing devices
US6913598 *Jan 22, 2001Jul 5, 2005Kuldip Chand TangriHandheld eye washing apparatus
US8034036 *Mar 11, 2008Oct 11, 2011Tom OsbornePortable eye flushing system and method
US20030004472 *Aug 20, 2002Jan 2, 2003Tangri Kuldip ChandHandheld eye washing apparatus
US20030208168 *Jan 22, 2001Nov 6, 2003Tangri Kuldip ChandHandheld eye washing apparatus
US20050027241 *Jul 30, 2003Feb 3, 2005Yeakley Rourke M.Wound and eye irrigator
US20060079851 *Oct 7, 2004Apr 13, 2006Guerrieri Richard PMultipurpose eye dropper and fountain device
US20080255527 *Mar 11, 2008Oct 16, 2008Tom OsbornePortable eye flushing system and method
WO2001026600A1 *Oct 10, 2000Apr 19, 2001Laboratoires GoŽmar S.A.Device for washing and bathing the eye
WO2005016219A1 *May 12, 2004Feb 24, 2005Yeakley Rourke MWound and eye irrigator
Classifications
U.S. Classification604/296, 528/26, 604/301
International ClassificationA61H35/00, A61M11/06, A61F9/00, A61H35/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F9/0008, A61M11/06, A61M2205/075, A61H35/02
European ClassificationA61M11/06, A61H35/02, A61F9/00B