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Publication numberUS2525154 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1950
Filing dateMar 26, 1946
Priority dateMar 26, 1946
Publication numberUS 2525154 A, US 2525154A, US-A-2525154, US2525154 A, US2525154A
InventorsCharles S Taylor
Original AssigneeMcclintock Taylor Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Decontaminator for petroleum fluids
US 2525154 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 10, 1950 c. s. TAYLOR DECONTAMNATOR FOR PETROLEUM FLUIDS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed March 26, 1946 am fa, mn ma W m5 ,d 5 f m/f H C, w m W ww w Nw; u Sq -mw ..m\\ fw Wsw Oct. vl0, 1950 c. s. TAYLOR 2,525,154

` nEcoNTAMINAToR FOR PETROLEUM FLuIns Filed March 26, 1946 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR. Uff/w55 L5? Z5 moe C. S. I'IAYLOR DECONTAMINATOR FOR PETROLEUM FLUIDS o ct. 1o, 195o 3 sheets-sheet s Filed March 26, 1946 iatenteci ct. i0,

DECONTAMINATOR FOR PETROLEUM FLUIDS Charles S. Taylor, Los Angeles, Calif., assignor, by mesne assignments, to-McClintock-Taylor, Inc., a corporation of California Application March 26, 1946, Serial No. 657,276 s claims. (c1. 21o-44') 1 My invention relates to decontaminating apparatus and nds particular utility when employed Yto remove air, Water and solid material from petroleum fluids such as gasoline.

In filling or fueling stations Where relatively large quantities of fuel such as gasoline are stored and from time to time pumped in somewhat smaller quantities into the fuel tanks of vehicles, such as trucks, tractors, aeroplanes and the like, considerable difficulty has in past been encountered because of contamination of these petroleum fluids through the gradualV or accidental accumulation in the fuel storage tanks of water and solid material, such as rust, scale, sand and thelike. There is also attendant' upon the pumping and handling of such uids the entrapment of a considerable quantity of air. These materials must,v of course,V be removed from the fuel before it is pumped into the fueltanks ofthe vehicles since the pressure of air4 impairs the h accuracy of fuel metering equipment, and since, as in the case of aircraft, expensive and lifetaking accidents may result from clogged fuel lines or from faulty carburetion andfaulty engine performance due to the presence of these contaminants.

The interposition in the fuel lines of simple screens will take out the larger particles ofsolid material and properly designed screens and traps will remove substantially all of such solid material.k These expedients do not, however, remove. the entrapped air and do not remove the water.

Furthermore, simple traps or settling basins will ordinarily not remove the Water since thisfordinarily becomes emulsied with the petroleum fluid, giving a milky appearance to normally` transparent fluids, such as gasoline. Such emulsions if allowed to stand either do not separate at all or at best separate very, very slowly.

The problem of providing pure unadulterated` fuel for the fuel tanks of vehicles requires also that any apparatus which is installed in the fuel lines leading to the fuel tanks ofthevehicles must be so constructed as to completelyvprotect against failure of the apparatus to function in its intended mannerv or failure of the apparatus to remove all of the Water from the fuel due` to the presence of a sufficient quantity of water to over-` load the apparatus. l

ItY is therefore an `object of my invention to provide a decontaminating apparatus for use With petroleum fluids which includes means for trap' ping Vand removing solid materials,'togetherwith means for coagulating a water emulsion of saidH Cri fluid to permit the water to'separate from the fluid.

It is also an object of my invention to provide an apparatus of the character set forth in the preceding paragraph which includes means also .for automatically discharging air from vthe sysy tem as it is released from the uid.

It is an additional object of my invention to provide an apparatus of the character set forth in the preceding paragraphs which includes means for trapping the water separated from the emulsion, together with a means for automatically discharging the water from thetrap at substantially the same rate as it accumulates therein.

It is a still further object of my invention to provide an apparatus of the character referredA to, hereinbefore which includes ar valve means for arresting the flow of petroleum fluid through the apparatus whenever the rate of water discharged from the trap becomes less than the rate of accumulation thereof.

It is additionally an object of my invention to provide an apparatus of the character vset forth hereinbefore in which the arresting valve automatically reopens to restore the ow of petroleum fluid whenever the water in the trap is discharged Atoa normal level.

It is also an object of my invention to provide an apparatus of the character hereinbefore referred to in which the arresting valve operates to throttle the flow through the apparatus in accordance Vwith the rate of water accumulation in the trap. A l

It is a still further objectv of my invention to provide an 'apparatus of the characterset forth in the preceding paragraphs which includes a means for arresting the flow of petroleum fluid through the apparatus whenever the automatic water dis,- charging mechanism fails to function.

, Other objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from e. study of the followingl specifications, read in connection with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Fig`.`. 1 is a side elevational view with parts broken away and other parts shown in section illustrating a decontaminating apparatus in-A tended particularly for use with aviation gasoline and illustrating the general arrangement of the parts employed in the apparatus; i Y

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view of that portion of the apparatus whichis shown at the left end of Fig. 1; Y l

Fig. `3 is a fragmentary sectional view of the `Valve mechanism shown in Fig. 2 and illustrating an alternate position of the valve parts;

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3 but showing still a different position of the valve;

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional view taken in the horizontal plane represented by the line V-V in Fig. 2; and

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary cross-sectional view taken substantially along the line VI-VI of Fig. 4. f

Fig. 7 is a view showing the details of the pilot valve showing how the water ilows through the pilot valve to the discharge valve.

Referring to the drawings, IA have illustrated in Fig. 1 a decontamnating apparatus which is intended particularly for use in removing air, water and solid materials froma light-weight petroleum fluid such as aviation gasoline. Described generally, the apparatus comprises a main chamber or tank indicated generally at I', together with an inlet connection 2 and a discharge connection 3, it being understood that the apparatus showrl in Fig.` l is interpositioned in any linemextendmg between two receptacles between which the gasoline is to be transferred, as forfexample inthe line leading from a fueling stationsv storage tanks to the fuel tanks of a vehicIe',-or"between the fuel tank of a vehicle and the engine thereof.

The fuel to be treated by the apparatus is introduced into the chamber I through the inlet 2 and'v after being processed in a manner to be describedr hereafter, the pure petroleum Vfluid is dischargedl through the discharge connection 3 to baconveyedfby piping or hoses (not shown) to thereceiving container or point of consumption. "Thef apparatus enclosed within the chamber I may'bebriely described as comprising an inlet screen or filter 4 through which the untreated fuel must pass before having free access to the interiorof the chamber i. Below the inlet screen 4 there is provided a trap 5 to collect the heavy contaminants and` any' waterV which may enter the apparatus in the form of relatively large drops or" slugsfA liter passing through the inlet screen 'or filter 4, the petroleum uid moves to the; left through the chamber I as viewed in Fig.

lj'andjin so doing is passedthrough a treatment cartridge Yl within'which is packed a, lter mediurn of such character that a water emulsionr of the petroleum fluid is coagulated to produce relatively large drops or a stream of water which, Y serofgreaterv weight than the petroleum iluid, settle to the bottom of the chamber. 'I'he chamber Iris inclined downwardly to the left as shown in Fig. l so that the water falling to the bottom ofthe chamber I will flow by gravity to the left as viewed in Fig. 1 to be collectedin a trap or'sump indicated generally at l.

`'Ihe filter medium contained within thev cartridg'ej also serves to coagulate air which may be entrapped within the petroleum fluid to causeV relatively large bubbles thereof to emerge from the left-handend of the cartridge near the top of the chamber. The air'thus separated from the uid is collected in a dome 8 which is provided with an air reliefv valve indicated generally atS a'nd operating to discharge air from the dome 8 without permitting any of the petroleum iluid to escape.

v`Within the sump and extending upwardly through the left end of the chamber I there is provided an automaticv valve mechanism indicated generally by the reference character I0. The treated petroleum fluid isl forced by means of a baiile II to flow completely to the left-hand end-of the chamber I and thenr upwardly through 4 a portion of the valve mechanism I0 to reach the discharge connection 3.

The cartridge 6 containing the filtering or coagulating medium and the inlet screen 4 may comprise substantially any suitable construction operating to produce the results above mentioned. Preference is expressed, however, for a cartridge construction such as that disclosed and claimed in my copending application Serial No. 657,277, filed March 26, 1946, now abandoned, and entitled Cartridge-type Decontaminator for Petroleum Fluids and for an inlet filter or screen construction of the character disclosed in my copending application Serial No. 657,275, filed yMarch 26, 1946, now patent Ser. No. 2,468,382, April 2 6,194:9,`and entitled Inlet Screen for Decontaminators.

The construction and operation of the automatic valve I 0 is shown in Figs. 2 through 6. Referring now to Figs. l and 2, the discharge connection 3 is illustrated as comprising a flanged elbowsecuredfto'ahorizontal'flange I2 secured (ill as by means, of bolts" I3ito a llange I4 welded or otherwise affixed to an upstanding cylindrical portion I5 of the chamber I. Between the fianges I 2 and I4 there is clamped an intermediate ange I6 which is secured as by welding to a removable sleeve I'I. The sleeve I'I passes through a suitable aperture I `formed in the baiiie II and extends downwardly into the sump or trap I to a point near the bottom thereof. It will be seen that removal of the bolts I3 and flange I2 frees the flange I6' and the sleeve Il carried thereby so that the sleeve I'Ij may be removed from the chamber I upwardly through the opening resulting from the removal of the flange I 2.

The upperend of the sleeve I'I carries a supporting inwardly extending flange I9 upon which is rested a flange 20 from which depends a cylindrical sleeve-like member 2l forming the stationaryelement of "a slide valve portion of the automatic valve mechanism I0;

The. sleeve 2| 'is'encircled by a sleeve 22 comprising the movable part o f the valve. 'Ii'his sleeve is conneted'in a manner to be described hereinafter tothe upper end -of an actuating rod 23, to the lower end of which is secured a float membei# or hollow metal ball 24. The ball is intendedA to ride theinterface between the petroleurri'iluidv with which the'chamber is filled and water which has collected in the lower portion of "the sump l, it being understood that the weight and'displacement ofthe float 24 and the mechanisrnl` secureld'thereto' is adjusted to have an average density less, than that of water and greater than that of thepetroleum uid which is processed by the apparatus.

The float24, inaddition.` to actuating the valve mechanisml 21"; 22 is connected to operate a pilot valve 25V which in turn controls the operation of a water discharge valve 26 connected as by piping 21 to the lower portion of the sump l. The discharge valve 26 may be of any type, for example'a diaphragm or piston operated valve that opens whenY pressure above the diaphragm is vented to atmosphere. In Figs. 1 and 2 the oat 24, is shown in a position resulting from accumulation of water at anormal rate, which position will hereinafter be termed the normal position. In the illustrated position of the float the pilot valve 25r is in an operating positionthus in turn opening thel water discharge valve 26 to allow waterto, now from thebottom of the sump lZthrough the piping 21 and thus out of the cham- Fluid pressure to be controlled by the pilot valve 25 for actuatingthe water discharge valve 26 is, by preference, provided by the water which is contained in the bottom of the sump 1, it beingA appreciated that the internal pressure within the entire chamber I is usually materially higher than atmosphere since a considerable head is required to produce a sufficiently rapid flow of the petroleum fluid into the fuel tanks of the vehicle being serviced. Y

Accordingly a fluid connection indicated diagrammatically at 28 and including a Valve 29 extends from the piping 21 to the fluid pressure inlet port of the Valve 25.` This pressure may be selectively communicated by the pilot valve 25 through a tubing line 30 to the discharge valve 26 to cause the discharge valve to be closed. The float may also operate the pilot valve 25 to close off the pressure line 28 and at the same time vent the tubing line 30 to atmosphere through a tube 62. The pressure of the fluid being controlled may then open valve 26 by forcing its diaphragm or piston upwardly, and water will then discharge through the piping 21 and the valve 26. The lowering of the water-petroleum interface will then cause the oat 24 to fall, operating the pilot valve 25 to the condition noted above, wherein pressure will be communicated to the tubing line 39, thus closing discharge Valve 26. Thus the pilot valve 25 may be of any conventional type that selectively communicates a control line to pressure or to atmosphere.

In the event the apparatus is to be used in 1ocations where the temperature falls below the freezing point of Water so that the water contained in line 28 would be liable to solidication through freezing, the apparatus is arranged to permit the pilot valve 25 and the water discharge valve 26 to be actuated by high pressure petroleum fluid. For this purpose a fluid pressure line indicated at 3| and diagrammatically at 32 is extended from the inlet connection 2 through a shut-off valve 33 to the fluid pressure inlet port of the valve 25.

According to the preferred embodiment of my invention the interconnection between the float The valve 25 is comprehended as including a rotatable shaft 35 which is extended through the wall of the housing portion 34 as by means of packing glands or other suitable apparatus. To the shaft 35 there is secured, as by welding or bracing,v a sleeve 36. The sleeve 36 receives a pin 31 which is pivotally secured to the float 24 as by means of a pivot pin 38 engaging ears 39 formed on or suitably secured to the float 24. It will be seen that as the float rises and falls as represented by the dotted line positions inFig.Y 2, the telescoping or extensible connection between the pin 31 and the sleeve 36 permits a straight line vertical motion of the float 24 to be translated into a pivotal motion of the valve shaft 35.

The pilot valve is so arranged that when the roat 24 occupies its mid position as is shown in Fig. 1, the valve 25 will discharge waterl Fig. 2 to an extreme upper position as shown by the dotted lines marked 24a in Fig. 2, the valve 26 will be suddenly opened to obtain a maximum discharge rate.

As is best shown in Fig, 2, the removable sleeve I1 is slotted as shown at 49 to receive the linkage 36, 31 which interconnects the float 24 and the valves 25. Similarly, at a point near the bottom of the chamber I, the sleeve i1 is cut away as shown at 4I to permit free access of K water accumulating in the bottom of the charnthrough the tube 62. YI prefer to use a trigger or snap action valve sothat whenv the water level rises in the sump 1 to raise the float 24 from the center position shown in solid lines in ber I to the sump 1, the opening permitting such water to pass down into the sumpl on both the inside and the outside of the sleeve I1. The opening 4i also permits free access for assembling the parts of the valve mechanism Ill.

The float 24 is preferably guided during its' movement within the sleeve l1. This guiding is in part provided by the actuating rod 23 which is passed through a guiding aperture 42 provided in a transversely extending plate or bulkhead 43 positioned within the sleeve l1 above the opening 4l and secured to the sleeve Hin any suitable manner as by means of screws 44.

Additional guiding of the float 24 is provided in the manner shown in Fig. 5 by a pair of oppositely positioned guiding channels 45 and 46 suitably secured to theV inner surface of the sleeve i1 and receiving guide pins 41 and 48 affixed to the float 24.

The upper end of the actuating rod 23 is secured to the movable portion 22 of the discharge valve mechanism. As is best shown in Figs. 2, 3 and 4, this movable portion comprises a sleeve 49 which surrounds the aforementioned stationary sleeve 2i. The bottom end of the sleeve 49 is closed by means of a transversely extending plate 59 which is secured to the sleeve 49 in any suitable manner and to which is in turn secured a downwardly extending guide rod 5l which is received within a guiding aperture 52 formed in the bulkhead 43.

The guide rod 5i is employed to prevent'rotation of the valve mechanism 22 with respect to the sleeve l1, it being understood that such rotation would otherwise be permitted because of a flexible or loose connection between the actuating rod 23 and the sleeve 49. This connection comprises a downwardly extending threaded boss `53 adapted to receive a threaded cap 54. The boss 53 is counterbored to denne an inner chamber 55 for receiving a head portion 56 formed on the upper end of the rod 23. -The head 56 is made smaller in all dimensions than the chamber 55 so that the movable valve portion 22 is permitted a slight amount of movement with respect to the actuating rod 23.

As is best shown in Fig. 4, the sleeve 49 is provided with a plurality of rectangular apertures 51 positioned substantially midway between the lower closure 50 and the upper end 58 of the sleeve 49,. These apertures are angularly disposed to register with similar apertures 59 provided in the lower portion of the sleeve 2| immediately above a lower closure plate 69 which is suitably secured to the lower end of the sleeve 2 l.

It will be seen that by virtue of the actuating rod 23, the outer or movable valve member 22 will be moved upwardly and downwardly over the stationary sleeve portion 2i'l as the float 24 rises and falls within the sump 1. As isbest shown in Fig. 2, the length of the actuating rod 23 is ladjusted to substantially register theA valve openings 51 and 59 when' the float 24 ocdischarge of the petroleum fluid from the chamber l through the interior of the 'sleeve v2| to the discharge connection 3. The -described flow enters the interior of the sleeve l'l from the chamber l through a suitable aperture BI provided in the sleeve I1.

If the rate of water accumulation in the sump 1 increases, the float 24 rises. As the rate of accumulation continues to increase, the float 24 assumes a progressively higher position. This results in an upward movement of the movable valve portion 22 with respect to the stationary portion 2l so that the ports 57 and 59 are gradually moved out ofregister with each other and the port area through which the petroleum fluid is discharged is thereby reduced. This tends to throttle the flow of petroleum fluid to reduce the rate of such flow.

However, if., due to the injection of large slugs of water into the chamber I the water rises in the sump l to a dangerously higher level, the float 24 will be moved to its extreme upper position shown at 2da in Fig. 2. This will position the movable valve portion 22 as shown in Fig. 3 in which the ports 5l and 59 are moved entirely out of register and the ports 5S in the stationary member 2| are completely covered by the continuous cylindrical lower portion of the sleeve 49. In this position communication between the interior of the chamber lI and the discharge connection 3 is cut oil so that all flow of petroleum fluid through the apparatus is substantially arrested. This vcondition will obtain until the excessive water accumulation in the sump l h'as been drained off through the water the water level in the sump 'l continues to fall to the normal level, the ports 5l and 59 will be moved nearer and nearer to complete registration and the -rate of flow of petroleum fluid through the apparatus will be continually increased until the normal full rate of flow is reestablished.

I have indicated lby 'means of the dotted lines marked Zlib in Fig. 2 the extreme lower position of the float 2d. 'This position is not reached during normal operation of the device but represents the positions occupied by the various parts in the event the float 24 is punctured or otherwise accumulates sufficient additional weight to prevent it from rising and falling with the rise and fall in the water level.

In the lower position indicated at 24h in Fig. 2, the pilot valve 25 is turned to a position completely closing the water discharge valve 26 so as to prevent the discharge of any petroleum fluid. Also the valve sleeve 22 is moved to the position which is shown in Fig. 4 in which the upper continuous portion of the sleeve i9 disposed between the openings 5l and the upper end 58 of the sleeve is positioned to completely close off the ports 59, thus substantially arresting all flow of petroleum fluid tothe discharge connection 3,

It will be seen that in the event the apparatus becomes inoperative through the sinking of the float 24, the delivery of fluid to the fuel tanks of the vehicle is stopped so as to completely obviate any chance of contaminated fluid -being delivered to the fuel tank-s of the vehicle as a result of faulty operation of the apparatus.

The parts of the slide valve comprising the sleeves 2l and 22 are preferably carefully ma- 8 chined so as to provide a freely running 'fit of the part 22 with respect to the part 2|. I have found that by providing suincient clearance between these two relatively movable parts to permit a very slight flow of petroleum fluid through the valve even inV its closed positions, I am able to obtain a hydraulic balance by virtue of the flow through the narrow annular aperture between the valve parts which prevents the valve from becoming stuck in any one position and which permits the valve to be readily moved in response to the forces developed by the float 2d.

From the foregoing it will be observed that I have provided a decontaminator for petroleum fluids which comprises a 'completely self-contained mechanism permitting its ready connection into a petroleum fluid line extending from any storage reservoir to another or extending between a tank and the fuel tank or engine of a vehicle.

Attention is directed particularly to the fact that this completely yself-contained mechanism includes apparatus functioning to remove from the petroleum fluid vtreated therein substantially l all of the solid material, air and water which may contaminate sai-d fluid.

Attention is also directed particularly to the novel control apparatus which is included in the mechanism and which functions to discharge the water collecting in the sump at substantially the same rate as the water accumulates therein. It is desired to stress the fact that whenever the rate of water accumulation exceeds the capacity of the water discharge mechanism, the rate of flow of petroleum fluid is correspondingly reduced or even arrested in extreme cases. Furthermore, provision is made for rendering the device inoperative to pass petroleum fluid through the treatment chamber in the event the float mechanism should be punctured and sent to the bottom of the sump.

While I have shown and described the preferred embodimentof my invention, I do not desire to be limited to any-of the details of construction shown or described herein, except as defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

l. In a decontaminator for petroleum fluids including a treatment chamber having inlet and outlet connections and means in said chamber between said inlet and outlet connections for coagulating water emulsions of said fluid and collecting in a sump disposed between said cogulating means and said outlet connection all'water Separated from said fluid, a control apparatus v comprising: a water discharge conduit communicating with said sump; a water discharge valve in said conduit; lcontrol means responsive to rise and fall of the water-petroleum fluid interface for operating said valve; a fluid control valve interposed between said inlet and outlet connections and closable to arrest flow o1" petroleum fluid through said outlet connection; and a mechanical coupling from said fluid control valve to said control means for closing said control valve upon a predetermined rise of said interface.

2. In a decontaminator for petroleum uids including a treatment chamber having inlet and outlet connections and means in said chamber between said inlet and outlet connections for coagulating water emulsions of said fluid and collecting in a sump disposed between said coagulating means and said outlet connection all water separated from said fluid, a control apparatus comprising; a water discharge conduit communieating with said sump; a water discharge valve in Said conduit; a control iloat responsive to rise and fall of the water-petroleum iiuid interface for operating said valve; a fluid control valve in the chamber interposed between said inlet and outlet connections and closable gradually to progressively retard and iinally arrest flow of petroleum fluid through said outlet connection; and a mechanical coupling from said fluid control valve to said control means for gradually closing said valve upon a gradual rise of said interface.

3. In a decontaminator for petroleum fluids including a treatment chamber having inlet and outlet connections and means in said chamber between said inletand outlet connections for coagulating water emulsions of said fluid and collecting in a sump disposed between said coagulating means and said outlet connection all water separated from said fluid, a control apparatus comprising: a iloat weighted to follow the rise and fall of water-petroleum fluid interface in said sump; level control sump discharge valve means coupled to said float for discharging water from said sump in response to rising of said interface; and a flow valve coupled to said float for arresting flow of fluid through said outlet connection whenever said float falls materially below said normal level, whereby ilow of petroleum fluid through said outlet, is arrested whenever said float becomes defective and sinks below said interface.

4. In a decontaminator for petroleum fluids including a treatment chamber having inlet and outlet connections and means in said chamber between said inlet and outlet connections for coagulating water emulsions of said fluid and collecting in a sump disposed between said coagulating means and said outlet connection all water separated from said fluid, a control apparatus comprising: a water discharge conduit communieating with said sump; a valve in said conduit; a float in said sump weighted to follow the rise and fall of the Water-petroleum iiuid interface; control means coupling said float to said valve for opening and closing said valve in response to rise and fall of said interface; a uid control valve interposed between said inlet and outlet connections and movable from one fully closed position through a fully open position to a second fully closed position; and an actuating means connecting said iioat to said valve for so moving said valve in response to rise of said interface.

5. In a decontaminator for petroleum fluids including a treatment chamber having inlet and outlet connections and means in said chamber between said inlet and outlet connections for coagulating water emulsions of said iluid and collecting in a sump disposed between said coagulating means and said outlet connection all water separated from said fluid, a control apparatus comprising: a water discharge conduit communicating with said sump; a valve in said conduit; a float in said sump'weighted to follow the rise and fall of the water-petroleum fluid interface; control means coupling said float to said valve for opening and closing said valve in response to rise and fall of said interface; a fluid control valve interposed between said inlet and outlet connections and movable from one fully closed position through a fully open position to a second fully closed position; and an actuating means connecting said float to said valve for so moving said valve in response to rise of said interface, said control valve being hydraulically balanced to permit it being moved from said fully closed positions by relatively small forces derived from said float.

6. In a decontaminator for petroleum fluids including a treatment chamber having inlet and outlet, connections and means in said chamber between said inlet and outlet connections for coagulating water emulsions of said iluid and collecting in a sump disposed between said coagulating meansl and said outlet connection all water separated from said fluid, a control apparatus comprising: a Water discharge conduit communicating with said sump; a valve in said conduit; a float in said sump weighted to follow the rise and fall of the water-petroleum fluid interface; control means coupling said float to said valve for opening and closing said valve in response to rise and fall of said interface; a stationary sleeve forming a continuation of one of said connections within said chamber, said sleeve having ports extending through the side walls thereof; means closing the end of said sleeve; an axially movable sleeve surrounding said stationary sleeve, said movable sleeve having ports extending through the side walls thereof at locations spaced from the ends thereof and adapted to register with said ports in said stationary sleeve in one axial position of said movable sleeve, whereby said ports are out of registration in axial positions of said movable sleeve on either side of said one position; and an actuating rod connecting said movable sleeve to said float.

CHARLES S. TAYLOR.

REFERENCES CITED The 4following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 313,693 Thornton Mar. 10, 1885 788,359 Kasper Apr. 25, 1905 1,416,538 Wichman May 16, 1922 1,459,486 Whitney et al June 19, 1923 1,535,721 Gill Apr. 28, 1925 1,948,543 Samiran Feb. 27, 1934 1,958,010 Meurk May 8, 1934 2,002,253 Thompson May 2l, 1935 2,294,330 Clark Aug. 25, 1942 2,375,428 Marsh May 8, 1945 2,412,841 Spangler Dec. 17, 1946 2,442,379 Samiran June 1, 1948

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2657760 *Jan 9, 1950Nov 3, 1953Nat Tank CoHorizontal separator
US2673648 *Mar 24, 1952Mar 30, 1954Stanley G HarwoodSeparator drain valve structure
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US7981278 *Aug 28, 2008Jul 19, 2011Honda Motor Co., Ltd.Gasoline-ethanol separation apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification210/115, 137/398, 210/DIG.500, 137/172, 137/173
International ClassificationC10G33/06, B01D17/02, C10G31/08
Cooperative ClassificationY10S210/05, C10G31/08, C10G33/06, B01D17/0214
European ClassificationB01D17/02F4, C10G31/08, C10G33/06