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Publication numberUS2525745 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 10, 1950
Filing dateJun 27, 1947
Priority dateJun 27, 1947
Publication numberUS 2525745 A, US 2525745A, US-A-2525745, US2525745 A, US2525745A
InventorsKeith H Wycoff
Original AssigneeKeith H Wycoff
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Nursing unit
US 2525745 A
Images(1)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

K. H. WYCOF F Oct. 10, 1950 NURSING UNIT Filed June 27, 194'? v KAVAVAVAVAVAVA avnarnvnvm.

m v u M Zinnentor Kn m H" h/YroF \rAwAvAvAvA Gttorneg Patented Oct. 10, 1950 UNITED STATES PATIENT. aomcei NURSING UNIT Keith H. Wycoff, Akron, Ohio Application June 27, 1947, Serial No. 757,520

This invention relates to an improvement in nursing units and to a strainer to be used in such units, so that when fruit juices or other fluids are fed from the unit the opening or openings thru which the fluids are fed will not become clogged with particles contained in the fluids. The nipple may be held onto the bottle in any suitable manner, as, for example, by a retaining cap, or the nipple itself may be screwed or pulled on to the bottle so that no separate fastening means is required.

In the nursing unit of this invention there is a strainer across the top of the bottle which strains the contents of the bottle as it flows toward the nipple and the rim of the strainer will ordinarily be of such composition that whenheld in contact with the top edge of the bottle it forms a liquid-tight seal therewith. The strainer is preferably formed of wire screen or other screening material with a rim of different composition around its edge, the rim usually being thicker than the screening. In a preferred 7 Claims. (Cl. 215-11) form of the invention, the strainer is fiat with a perforate portion formed of screening and is used in connection with a nipple formed with a flange which extends laterally from the base of the neck of the nipple, with the strainer just below this flange; and the rim of the strainer has a much greater internal diameter than the neck of the nipple and stands above the perforate portion of the strainer and spaces the flange from the perforate portion of the strainer so that the effective straining area of the strainer is greater than the area of the base of the neck of the nipple.

The invention will be explained in connection with a nursing unit now on the market, which will be described in detail, although it is to be understood that the invention is not necessarily limited to this particular unit,

In the drawings, Fig. 1 is an exploded view of the upper part of the bottle with a nipple, retain ing cap and strainer in position to be assembled for use. Fig. 2 is a cross section through the same, assembled ready for use. Fig. 3 is a cross section through the same, together with a stopper, assembled for storage of food, after sterilization. Fig. 4 is a section of the strainer on the line 4-4 of Fig. 1. Figs. 5 and 6 are similar sections through strainers of modified construction and Fig. '7 is a view in perspective of the stopper shown in Fig. 3.

It is customary at the present time to use the nipple I, retaining cap 2 and wide-mouthed bottle 3, and to assemble the same by clamping the flange 4 of the nipple against the top edge 5 of the bottle by screwing the retaining cap 2 down on to the bottle. The retaining cap 2 comprises the internally threaded cylindrical portion In and the top-retaining flange H and on the under surface of the latter near the cylindrical portion is the bead I2. When the retaining cap is screwed down on to the bottle with the laterally extending flange 4 of the nipple between it and the top of the bottle, the bead l2 presses tight against the upper surface of the rubber flange 4 of the nipple thereby preventing accidental displacement and forming a liquid-tight seal between the nipple and the top edge of the bottle so as to prevent in use this cap It! is screwed down so that the bead I2 is embedded in the rubber flange 4 and the under surface of the flange II of the retaining cap is in contact with the upper surface of the rubber flange 4 and closes the perforations 35 (whose function is described below).

Although the invention is not limited to the particular type of nipple shown in the drawings this nipple will be explained in detail as the combination illustrates well the features of this invention. The nipple is provided with a laterally extending flange 4 by which the nipple is supported and in which the air vents 35 are located. The diameter of the neck of the nipple is substantially smaller than the mouth of the bottle so that the flange 4 extends a substantial distance inwardly from the edge of the bottle to the neck of the nipple. For this reason the preferred form of strainer is provided with a rim at its outer edge of sufficient thickness to space the strainer from the under surface of the flange of the nipple facilitating the flow of strained liquid between the strainer and the under surface of the flange, and so as not to interfere with the venting action thru the vents 35. Thus the effective area of the strainer is not limited to the area of the neck of the nipple but is increased to cover substantially the whole areaof the mouth of the bottle. For example, the outside and. inside diameters of the mouth of the bottle may be about one and one-half inches and one and e inches respectively. The strainer should then be about one and one-half inches in diameter. The rim may'conveniently be about inch wide, making the inside diameter of the passage of liquid from the outer edge of the filtering area which is about one and inches in diameter to the'neck of the nipple.

' Spaced only a short distance above the flange 4 of the nipple is the enlargement 2B which en-' circles the neck or upwardly extending portion of the nipple stiffening it against collapse and preventing the nipple from being drawn down 3 ward ly too far through the opening 2 I in the retaining cap as th nipple is used. There are three buttons 24' spaced evenly around the nipple Just under the flange which keep the enlarge ment 20 spaced 2. short distance above the upper surface of the flange ll of the retaining cap 2. Extending downwardly from each button 24 is a narrow rib which provides an air space between the inner edge 2| of the hole in the retaining cap and the wall of the nipple below the enlargement 20.

0n the top surface of the laterally extending flange 4 is the annular groove 30, adjacent the base of the neck of the nipple. On the under surface of this flange and almost directly below the groove is the groove 3|. These grooves make the laterally extending portion of the nipple relatively thin at this point. This facilitates the flexing of the flange 4.

There are two small perforations through opposite sides of this flange, and these perforations are located outside of the relatively thin portion of the flange, in the portion which covers the open portion of the mouth of the bottle when the nipple and retaining cap are assembled for use. These perforations are normally closed at the upper surface of the flange l of the nipple by the flange l! of the retaining cap, preventing flow of liquid from the nipple. When a partial vacuum is formed by suction on the nipple the flange 4 is flexed inwardly slightly, permitting air to enter the vents in the flange. When sufflcient air has entered, the flange. will flex back to a sealing position in contact with the under face of the flange ll of the retaining cap, thereby preventing entrance of additional air and escape of fluid from the. bottle. This venting action will not be interfered with by the strainer since the screen does not press tightly against the flange and the inner diameter of the rim 4| will correspond to that of the mouth of the bottle and thereforewill not cover the vents.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 2 the strainer flts over the top of the bottle below the laterally extending flangeof the nipple. The outside diameter of the, strainer. is approximately the same as theoutside diameter. of. the mouth of the bottle and should preferably be no. wider than the top edge of the bottle. This permits the use of a flat screen ofthe'greatest useful area without inter ference, with the. action of the vents 35.

The rim 4|. serves as a gasket. When the unit isassembledfor use, as in. Fig. 2, thesoftrubber flange A conforms to the contour of the upper surfac of this rim; but it is important that the lower surface ofthe rim conform to the surface of the top of the bottle, so that the rim serves as a gasket to prevent escape of the fluid from the unit. When the unit is assembled for storage, as in Fig. 3, the rim similarly prevents escape of the 4 may be desirable only because they provide increased flltering area.

The strainer is manufactured in any suitable manner. One convenient method comprises placing a ring of the gasket material above the wire screen and another below, and then sealing these rings by heat and pressure or by an adhesive. If the rings be of a curable plastic, they ma be cured in the operation. Molding, dipping and other methods of forming the rim may be employed. The gasket material must be non-toxic, non-taste-imparting and must withstand sterilization.

Figs. 4, 5 and 6 are enlarged views of different types of strainers. In Fig. 6 the rim 15 is not appreciably thicker than the screen. It serves as a gasket and may perform other important functions. For instance, it may prevent the wires or other cross members of the screen portion of the strainer from unravellin and covers them to present a smooth edge. The rim may also strengthen the strainer and maintain its shape. When assembled with the nipple shown there is not sufiicient room between the upper edge of the exposed surface of this screen and the under surface of the laterally extending flange of the nipple to allow the flow of such a volume of liquid between them as to permit full use of the entire screen area. .When suction is applied to the nipple, and particularly as the openings in the screen become clogged onblinded with particles strained out of the liquid, the screen and the aunder surface of the flange of the nipple are drawn together, and the space provided by such a thin rim is less likel to-insure a steady flow of liquid.

The rim ll ofF-igs. 1', 2 and 4 is sufliciently 'lithick to insure a flow of the strained liquid between the outer area ofthe screen and the flange, to theneck of the nipple. The rim M may, for example, be about .02-to .04 inch thicker than the screen whose thickness will vary according to -;;ithe size of the wire used, the nature of'the weave,

etc.

In the type of screen shown in Fig. 5'the rim 46 is thick above the screen, but is of no substantial thickness below the screen. This strainer may iimay be used as satisfactorily as the strainer shown in Figs. 1, 2 and-4 if; placed properly on the top of the bottle and possesses the possible advantage that it occupies less space in 'the retaining cap. The bottom and top sides of the rim may be JOf different colors to facilitate assembling the screen in the proper manner. Generally the type of screen shown in Fig. 4- will'be preferred because it is reversible.

Although it might at first appear that the open- .Fings in the screen must be smaller than the per fluid between the flange 4 of the nippleand the stopper 55.

The rim 4! of the strainer is composed of any suitable material and the perforate portion 42 is preferably woven of wire or other material suitable for use with foods. It is not necessary that this screen be flat. A perfectly flat screen is preferred because it is less liable to. be damaged, it will wear longer, it is cheaply made, it is mosteasily cleaned, and it is reversible. For use with a unit of the typeshownin thedrawings, a substantiall flat screen is necessary if it is to be assembled, as shown in Fig. 3, for storage of t he liquid. On the other hand, for units of other design curvedscreens maybenecessar-yr or they" foration in the nipple, this is not necessarily true. Screen openings which are larger than the nipple perforations may prevent the clogging or blinding of the perforation in the nipple. This may be due in part to the fact that the nipple material accommodates itself to thesize and shape of particles passing through its perforation, whereas the wires ofthe screen are substantially inflexible. The size of the particleswhich will pass through the openings in the nipple and the screenis dependent to-some extent upon the pressure differential at-the opposite faces of the nipple and screen respectively. Thepressure differential at opposite faces ofythescreenwill,only approach being the same as between the inside and outside of the nipplein a case of extreme blinding. Hence, the pressure differential at the opposite sides of the nipple will always be greater than on opposite sides of the screen and will force particles thru the nipple which would not pass thru screen openings of this size. For this reason the screen may stop all particles which would clog the nipple even tho the screen openings are larger than the normal nipple aperture.

In tests with a unit such as illustrated in the drawings, using orange juice of higher pulp content than normal and a nipple with a perforation about .012 inch in diameter, it was found that 40-mesh screen (openings of .018 inch) prevented stoppage of the nipple. Altho the passage of liquid was retarded as the bottle was nearly emptied, after shaking the bottle so that the remaining liquid removed the pulp from the screen, normal flow thru the nipple was restored.

It is customary with the type of bottle illus trated to put sterile food in the sterile bottle, and to sterilize the nipple and retaining cap and then to invert the nipple in the mouth of the bottle and clamp it down with the retaining cap 2, and then keep the food and nipple sterile in this manner during any period of storage of the food between the time of sterilization and the time of use. Each bottle is usually provided with a stopper 5% to close the opening 25 during such storage. The

handle 56 facilitates manipulation of this stopper.

When a screen of the type here contemplated is used with such a bottle it may conveniently be located between the stopper and the nipple during such storage as shown in Fig. 3. The rim 41 may then serve to space the screen away from the projecting button on the stopper so that it is not flexed or flexed less than it would otherwise be, were it not for this rim. Here again the rim of the screen serves as a seal against loss of fluids which might get through the nipple.

It is to be understood that the invention is not limited to all of the details shown and described.

For instance, if a cupped strainer is used instead of a fiat strainer, it may not be necessary to provide it with a thick rim in order to enjoy at least some of the advantages which result from the use of such a rim on a flat strainer.

The invention is defined in the appended claims.

I claim:

1. A nursing unit which comprises a nursing bottle, a nipple to fit thereon, and a strainer to fit over the mouth of the bottle under the nipple to strain liquid passing from the bottle to the nipple, the openings in the strainer being larger than any feeding perforation in the nipple but small enough to insure against passage of particles large enough to clog the nipple.

2. A nursing unit which comprises a nursing bottle, a nipple to fit thereon, and a strainer to fit over the top edge of the mouth of the bottle under the nipple to strain liquid passing from the bottle to the nipple, which nipple includes a laterally projecting portion which fits flat against the outer edge of the strainer when it is in place on the top of the bottle, said outer edge of the strainer including a rim of gasket material one surface of which is adjacent said nipple and the other surface of which is raised above the perforate portion of the strainer so that the rim forms a liquidtight seal with the element with which it is brought in pressure contact in the nursing unit, and a retaining cap which screws onto the bottle and clamps the outer edge of the strainer and the laterally projecting portion of the nipple in pressure contact against the top of the bottle.

3. A nursing unit which comprises a nursing bottle and a nipple which at the base of its neck is appreciably smaller in diameter than the mouth of the bottle, the nipple being supported over the mouth of the bottle and having a flange extending inwardly from the top edge of the bottle, a vent in the flange with its inner end opening only between the base of the neck and the top edge of the bottle to prevent the formation of a vacuum within the unit, a strainer having a rim which fits against the top edge of the bottle, the rim being so narrow as not to interfere with the operation of the vent.

4. A nursing unit which comprises a nursing bottle, a, nipple which has a flange extending laterally from the base of the neck thereof and inwardly from the top edge of the bottle, means for holding the nipple on the bottle with the flange over the top edge of the bottle and a strainer with a rim at the edge which is thicker than the perforate area within it, said strainer being adapted to be located at the top of the bottle beneath the flange of the nipple and, when so assembled, the perforate portion of the strainer near the rim being spaced from the flange sufficiently to permit substantial flow of strained liquid between them.

5. A strainer for a nursing bottle composed of flat screen with an annular rim at the border thereof which stands up from the surface of the screen on at least one surface of the strainer to space from said surface of the screen the flange of a nipple placed thereon to permit the flow of liquid therebetween, the strainer being substantially one and one-half inches in diameter, having openings of substantially .018 inch and bein non-toxic, non-taste-imparting, and capable of withstanding sterilization.

6. A nursing unit which comprises a nursing bottle, a nipple to fit therein, and a strainer to fit over the mouth of the bottle under the nipple to strain liquid passing from the bottle to the nipple, the perforate portion of which strainer is flat and woven with openings larger than any feeding perforation in the nipple but small enough to insure against passage of particles large enough to clog the nipple.

7. A nursing unit which comprises a nursing bottle and nipple which at the base of its neck is appreciably smaller in diameter than the mouth of the bottle, the nipple being supported over the mouth of the bottle and having a flange extending inwardly from the top edge of the bottle, a vent in the flange with its inner end opening only between the base of the neck and the top edge of the bottle to prevent the formation of a vacuum within the unit, a strainer having a rim which fits against the top edge of the bottle the inner diameter of which rim is at least substantially as large as the inner diameter of the top edge of the bottle whereby the rim does not interfere with the operation of the vent.

KEITH H. WYCOFF.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent! UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,041,378 Tweedale Oct; 15, 1912 1,361,243 Fuson Dec. 7, 1920 1,672,466 Oshman et al. June 5, 1928 2,093,130 Kurkjian Sept. 14, 1937 2,127,397 Freedlander [Aug. 16, 1938 l Certificate of Correction Patent No. 2,525,745 October 10, 1950 KEITH H. WYCOFF It is hereby certified that error appears in the printed specification of the above numbered patent requiring correction as follows:

Column 6, line 39, for the Word therein read thereon;

and that the said Letters Patent should be read as corrected above, so that the same may conform to the record of the case in the Patent Oflice.

Signed and sealed this 12th day of December A D 1950.

[men] I THOMAS F. MURPHY,

Assistant Oommissz'oner of Patents.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1041378 *Sep 6, 1911Oct 15, 1912Jean TweeddaleStrainer for nursing-bottles.
US1361243 *Dec 4, 1919Dec 7, 1920Amos J FusonGasolene-filter
US1672466 *Jan 14, 1927Jun 5, 1928Oshman BenjaminNursing bottle
US2093130 *Feb 21, 1934Sep 14, 1937Kurkjian Yervant HVenting valve system for nipples
US2127397 *Mar 8, 1937Aug 16, 1938Dayton Rubber Mfg CoStrainer
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3115980 *Mar 2, 1962Dec 31, 1963Woskin David Norman DeFormula container and nipple cap
US5284261 *Jul 20, 1992Feb 8, 1994Zambuto Sam CBaby bottle air vent
US5601199 *Jan 5, 1995Feb 11, 1997Marty; IreneFilter element for a beverage container
US6165362 *Nov 21, 1996Dec 26, 2000Innova Pure Water Inc.Bottle filter cap
US7163113Jul 16, 2001Jan 16, 2007Playtex Products, Inc.Vent disc with center knob
US7799008Mar 7, 2007Sep 21, 2010William HendricksBottle for delivering nutrients to an enteral feeding tube
US8016142Dec 20, 2007Sep 13, 2011Playtex Products, Inc.Vent valve assemblies for baby bottles
US8567619Mar 22, 2011Oct 29, 2013Playtex Products, LlcVent valve assemblies for baby bottles
DE4446215B4 *Dec 23, 1994Jun 14, 2006Irene MartyFilterelement sowie Getränkebehälter mit einem Filterelement
Classifications
U.S. Classification215/11.5
International ClassificationA61J11/00
Cooperative ClassificationA61J9/008, A61J11/00
European ClassificationA61J11/00, A61J9/00E