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Publication numberUS252747 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1882
Filing dateNov 22, 1881
Publication numberUS 252747 A, US 252747A, US-A-252747, US252747 A, US252747A
InventorsJames F. Edwards
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
edwards
US 252747 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(Model) J. F. EDWARDS.

ANGLE BRICK AND MOLD.

Patented J an. 24, 1882.

WITNESSES ATTORNEYS.

7 Ulvrren STATES PATENT Orrrca.

JAMES F. EDWARDS, OF WASHINGTON, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA.

ANGLE-BRICK AND MOLD.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 252,747, dated January 24, 1882.

Application filed November '22, 1881. (ModcL) Fig. 2 is a top view of my brick enlarged. Fig.

3 is a top view of the mold, showing in' dotted lines the variations in the angle. Fig. 4 is an enlarged view in detail, showing the rule-joint atthe adjustable angle. Fig. 5 is an end view of the mold, partly in section through the line no wof Fig. 3, looking in the direction of the emrow. Fig. 6 is a perspective view of the front pier of the bay-window beneath which it is placed, illustrating the old method of laying the brick; and Fig. 7 is a perspective view of the front pier of the hay-window beneath which it is placed, illustrating the manner of laying my brick.

The object of my invention is to provide an angle-brick for bay-windows and other obtuseangled-wall structures in which the bricks at the angle shall be substantially tied with lapjoints, and in which all cutting of brick shall be avoided, while the angle may be changed as desired. 4

In the ordinary methods of forming angledwalled structures, when the angle is greater than a right angle, anumber of objections exist. One method is to run up the wall or piers with the vertical joints coinciding at or near the angle, which is very objectionable for the reason that it is an insecure mechanical structure, there being nothing to tie thetwo walls forming the faces of the angle together, which'involves a liability to crack and fall apart. The other method is to place in the rectangular brick-mold triangular blocks, which make one edge of the brick angled or wedge-shaped. This permits the tie or lap to be made at the angle; but as the longitudinal sides of these angled bricks are ofless length than the sides ofa fullsized brick, it necessitates, when they are being laid, the supplementing of thedeficient length by the workman by what is known as closures and threequarter bats. These are 'in fact only parts of bricks, which have;

to be cut by the hammer and placed in as the work progresses. This latter method, it will be seen, involves an expenditure of much time and labor, and the edges of these cut sections of'brick cannot always be cut smoothly, so as to make an even and straight finish at the mortar-j oint.

In overcoming all of these objections my invention consists in a brick which is formed with one endrec'tangul Ir and the other end wedgeshaped, which brick is so proportioned that the shorter of the two longitudinal edges is just equal to the normal length ot'afull brick,while one of its beveled ends is exactly equal to the end of a full brick, or one-halt ot' the length of a full brick.

The invention also consists in a mold for forming this brick which is made adjustable, so as to regulate the size of the angle at the two exposed edges ot'the brick, as hereinafter more.

fully described. I

In the drawings, A'represents my improved brick, which, so far as the general outline of its live sides is concerned, does not varyfrom the angle bricks heretofore used. Its peculiarity, however, consistsin making the shorter one, a, of its two longitudinal edges exactly.

equal to the normal length of afull-sizedbrick, and with the beveled face I), which slopes to this angle, exactly equal to the end of a tall brick, or half the length of a full brick.

Now, in describing more clearly the great merit which my brick hasin the construc'ion of angled-walled structures when the angle is greater than a right angle, I refer to Figs. 1, 6, and 7, which represent, partly in ground plan antbpartly in perspective, a' bay-window in process of construction.

- At B B B are piers constructed with my brick, while at U is a pier constructed according to the method in general use, in which closures and three-quarter bats are employed. Now, at O, which shows the old method, it will be seen that the angle-brick A B having its sides much shorter than the length of a brick, an end section or half-brick is not long enough to fill out the side of a fourteeninch pier, while a whole brick is too lotig, and therefore a three-quarter .bat, %B, has to be cut to fill out this side of theangle, while its IOC bevel face being less than half a brick, a full brick, F B, is not long enough to fill out the other side of the pier, and a piece, 0, called a closure has to be put onto the end of the same. This method of cutting and fitting has to be practiced at every layer of brick, and it not only involves much time and trouble, but the vertical joints do not occur regularly in the middle of the bricks above and below it, and

the finish is unsymmetrical, while the chiseled edges of the cut sections will not make as straight ajoint as can be desired.

In my invention, as shown at B, it will be seen that the side a of my brick and the end of a full brick on one side of the angle are exactly equal to the face I) of my brick and the side of a full-sized brick on the other side of the angle in all of the layers, and the resultis that at the angle I get the benefit 0! the lap of a half-bricks length, which ties the two walls together. All cutting of closures andthreequarter bats is avoided, thereby saving much time and trouble. The vertical mortar-joints occur at the middle of the brick aboveand below, making a symmetrical finish, and no ragged edges of brick exist.

l have so far described my brick in the construction of a fourteen inch pier, one-half inch being always allowed for the mortar-joint. It is obvious that my invention is also applicable to nine-inch piers, or piers of any other width which are equally divisible by the length of a brick or a brick and a. half, and I may use it not only in the construction of bay-windows, but also in the angles of buildings, or wherever itmay be applicable.

For making my brick and giving it a variable angle at the point between the taces aand b which forms the angle in the wall, I construct a mold, D, with five sides, open at top and bottom, of which the side a, which forms the side a. of the brick, and the side I), which forms the side I) of the brick, are adj ustably jointed together with rounded and concaved edges and rule-joint hinges (I, so that a perfect angle will be formed at this point tor all difi'erent adjustments of the part b, For ho ding the part b to its position it is OOllllGGbrtl to the beveled piece 0 of the mold by a set-screw or other equivalentdevice; and suitable slots and guides may be provided, as shown in Fig. 5, which slots are preferably covered by a follower to prevent the clay from working through. As the side a is always equal to the length of a full brick and the side b always equal to the width of a full brick, it matters not what angle these two sides a, and b are set at, the brick will be perfect in its fitting, and it is not even necessary that the wall of the mold opposite a shall be exactly parallel with it, for all the sides of the brick are next to mortar-joints except a and b.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new is- 1. An angle-brick having one of its longitudinal faces equal in length to that of a normal brick, and having a bevel face inclining at an obtuse angle from the plane of said longitudinal face and equal in extent to the width of a normal brick, substantially as and for the purpose described.

2. 'An obtuse-angled-wall structure composed of rectangular bricks of a normal or definite length and anglebricks, each of the latter having one of its longitudinal faces equal in length to that of a normal brick, and having a bevel face inclining at an obtuse angle from the plane of said longitudinal face, which bevel face is equal in extent to the width of a full brick, substantially as and for the purpose described.

3. An angle-brick mold COHSIIllctGd substantially as described, and having the inner wall of its. side (0 equal to the length of a full brick and its side I) equal to the widthot' a full brick, and having also these two sidesjointed together for forming a variable angle, as described.

4. An angle-brick mold having its two sides which form the exposed faces of the brick connected together by an adjustable joint for varying said angle, as described. 1

5. An angle-brick mold having its two sides which form the exposed faces of the brick connected by a rule-joint with concave and convex edges, as described.

6. An angle-brick mold having its two sides which form the exposed faces of the brick connected by an adjustable joint, and a set-screw for fixing the position of the adjustable section, as described.

JAMES F. EDWARDS.

\Vitnesses:

Eown. A. BYRN, CHAS. A. IE'r'rrr.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5398474 *Dec 6, 1993Mar 21, 1995The Burns & Russell CompanyWall corner composite, mold and method for producing glazed unit for such
US5410848 *Nov 5, 1992May 2, 1995The Burns & Russell CompanyComposite for turning a corner or forming a column, mold and method for producing glazed unit for such
US5548936 *Feb 27, 1995Aug 27, 1996The Burns & Russell Company Of Baltimore CityComposite for turning a corner or forming a column, mold and method for producing glazed unit for such
US8607522Oct 8, 2012Dec 17, 2013Keystone Retaining Wall Systems LlcBlock system with corner block and method of manufacturing a block
US20090188196 *Jan 30, 2009Jul 30, 2009Keystone Retaining Wall Systems, Inc.Block system with corner block and method of manufacturing a block
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationE04B2/04