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Publication numberUS2528029 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1950
Filing dateNov 18, 1946
Priority dateApr 29, 1946
Publication numberUS 2528029 A, US 2528029A, US-A-2528029, US2528029 A, US2528029A
InventorsJames R Brown
Original AssigneeEducational Toy Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ball game employing a cube containing a pair of dice
US 2528029 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

ct. 3i, 195$ J. R. BROWN BALL GAME EMPLOYING A CUBE CONTAINING A PAIR OF DICE Filed Nov. 18, 1946 c [IIEZHEEIEEIQIEEIE [DIZIEIEIIEIEIE XEIEIEI 2ND BASE 4fi Code Charl- Clear Side INVENTOR.

HTTORNEYS.

Patented Oct. 31, 1950 V UNITED STATES P 2,528,029 OFFICE BALL GAME EMPLOYIN G A CUBE CONTAINENG A PAIR OF DICE Application November 18, 1946, Serial No. 710,687

In Canada April 29, 1946 2 Claims.

This invention relates to games and particularly to a baseball game in which a playing field, a code card and an indicating element reproduce plays simulating those of a major league baseball game.

While games have been provided heretofore to be played with an indicating device of one form or another, the present baseball game has been invented to simulate as nearly as possible a regulation game played by two teams. An indicating device is provided which, when operated, may show a ball, strike or foul, a plain or a marked area on six separate faces, any one of which may be indicated when the device is actuated. When the plain or marked area is indicated, then additional indications of numbers from 1 to 6 will be obtained on two other associated indicating devices which are distinguished from each other by different colors. A code is furnished with the game containing plays which occur in the regulation type of game made up for both the plain and the marked area of the first indicating device. The code corresponding to the plain or marked area is then examined to ascertain what play the corresponding colored numbers indicate. Markers are provided by which the playmay be indicated on the playing held for registering the score of the home and visiting teams, the number of strikes and balls on the batter and the number of outs for any particular inning.

The indicating device may be a card having three spinners thereon, each provided with six areas, on the first one of which the lain and marked area is located, along with the ball, strike, foul and ball areas. This spinner is first operated and the indicated strikes and balls are counted until'the batter has walked, is struck out or until the pointer rests upon the plain or the marked area. When the plain or marked area is indicated, the two additional pointers are spun to obtain two numbers, distinguished by color or by othermeans, which disclose the play to follow from the code chart corresponding to the plain or marked area. The game otherwise is played as aregular baseball game, three outs retiring the side and nine innings terminating the game.

The preferred indicator of the present invention embodies a large hollow cube having on four sides the ball, strike, foul and ball markings and having, in addition, two transparent sides, one

don'tainirig'a dot so that the two sides aredistin guished from each other. Within the hollow cube, span of dice is provided, one of red and one of g-reerrcolor: The cube is repeatedly cast and the ball and strike readings are tabulated until the batter is out or walked or until one or the other transparent side comes up so that the pair of dice on the-insideof the main die may be read. The readings from the red and green dice provide the numbers for locating the play on the code 2 charts, employing the one with or without the dot, depending upon whether the transparent window with or without the dot came up. A score book may also be provided in which each game is recorded.

Accordingly, the main objects of the present invention are: to provide a game simulating a baseball game, having indicating means for selecting one of a large number of the plays which occur in a regulation game; to provide a game simulating baseball in which a playing field is provided along with markers by which the plays may be followed as the game advances through the actuation of an indicating device which directs the play; to provide an indicating device for a simulated ball game which indicates balls, fouls, and strikes on the player when at bat and when the ball is struck by the batter and the play resulting from the striking of the ball; and, in general, to provide a ball game which accurately simulates a regulation game which is simple in construction and operation.

Other objects and features of novelty of the invention will be specifically pointed out or will become apparent when referring, for a better understanding of the invention, to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing, wherein:

Figure 1 is a plan view of a mat having thereon a ball field and other notations for following the play of a ball game which embodies features of this invention;

Fig. 2 is a view of an indicating device employed with the field illustrated in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a view of an indicating device, similar to that illustrated in Fig. 2, showing a further form thereof;

Fig. 4 is an exploded View of the indicating device illustrated in Fig. 2, showing the six sides thereof;

Fig. 5 is a view of an indicating device producing the same results as the devices illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3, showing a further form thereof;

Fig. 6 is a view of the code chart employed with the ball game of the present invention, and

Fig. '7 is a view of a score book provided for scoring the game as it is played.

In Fig. 1, a mat in is illustrated, depicting thereon a baseball playing field I I having a home plate [2, first, second and third bases, l3, l4, and I5, respectively. Batter boxes l6 and I! are illustrated on each side of the home plate, and coaching boxes l8 and I9 are indicated adjacent to first and third bases. Inning markers 2| for the home team and 22 for the visiting team are provided at the top of the mat, while markers for strikes, balls and cuts, 23, 24, and 25, respectively, are located at the bottom of the mat.

The indicating devices to be operated for indicating the plays on the batters are illustrated in Figs. 2, 3 and 5. The indicating device of Fig. 2 embodies a cube 26 having six faces, illustrated specifically in the exploded view of Fig. 4. One face 21 indicates a ball, another face 28 indicates a strike and a third face 29 indicates a ball, while a fourth face 31 indicates a foul. The transparent face 32 contains a dot 33 which may be red, black or any color, to distinguish from a sixth face 34 which is entirely transparent. The cube 26 contains a green die 35 and a red die 36, the top faces of which may be read through the transparent faces 32 and 34 When the cube has been thrown to have one or the other of these faces appear at the top.

The indicating device 31, illustrated in Fig. 3, is similar to that illustrated in Fig. 2, with the exception that the deviceis a round ball having six flat faces 38 thereon containing the indications illustrated in Fig. 4 as appearing on the six sides of the cube 26. In this arrangement the indicating device rolls more freely than the cube illustrated in Fig. 2, and more action results from the throwing of the device.

Au indicating device 39, illustrated in Fig. 5, can produce the same results as the indicating devices illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. In this arrangement a card 4| has thereon three circles 42, 43 and 44. The circle 42 contains six equal areas providing the same indication as the six faces of Fig. 4, that is to say, an area 2? for a ball, an area 28 indicating a strike, an area 29 indicating a ball,

an area 3| indicating a fouL an area 32 containing a dot 33, and a plain area 34. A spinner 45 in the center of the circle 4| is spun by the person playing the game to obtain an indication when the spinner stops. Thus, any one of the six faces of Fig. 4 may be indicated, the same as indicated when tossing the cube 26. When one of the plain areas 33 or 34 is indicated by the spinner 45, then the person playing the game spins the spinners 43 and 47 on the circles 43 and 44 which contain six like areas bearing numerals i to 6, the same as the dice and 36. Circle 43 is indicated as giving indications on the green die, While the circle 44 is indicated as giving numerals the same as those on the red die.

When operating any of the indicating devices, the indicator is first operated to have any one of the six areas illustrated in Fig. 4 indicated. Should this be a strike, ball or foul, then the indicating device is again manipulated, the balls, strikes and fouls being recorded until the batter walks, is struck out or until one of the plain areas 32 or 34 is indicated. When this occurs, the'pair of numbers on the red and green areas or dice are then read and from these numbers the code chart will give the corresponding play. Two sets of plays are made upon the code chart, one, 49, for the plain area 32 containing the dot 33, and the other 48, for the plain area 34. The two code charts follow.

CODE CHART Clear area--(with dot) Areas If Runners on Base Green Red 1 1 Runner Caught off Base N?) play if none on Runner nearest First Out if more than one on.

ase

1 2 Foul Fly Caught by Catcher 1 3 Line Drive to First Baseman 1 4 Line Drive to Second Bsseman Batter Out Runners hold their base. 1 5 Linc Drive to Third Bascman 1 6 Line Drive to Short Stop 2 1 Fly to Left Field 2 2 Fly to Center Field 2 3 Fly to Right Field Batter Out A runner on Third scores. 2 4 Fly to Left Field Any others hold their base. 2 5 Fly to Center Field 2 6 Fly to Right Field 3 1 Grounder-Pitcher to First Runner nearest Home is out y g to advance. Other 3 2 Groundcr-Second to First if no Runner Batter Runners advance one base. Batter is Safe at First. 3 3 Grounder-Third to First ut (F iclders Choice). 3 4 GrounderShort to First 3, 5 pit h to First Double Play if man on First. Man on First out at Second. 3 '6 Gro'under'lhird to First Batter Out Any other Runners hold their base unless forced. '4 1 Grounder- Short to First 4 2 Groundcr-Second to First 7 v y 7 4 3 Line Drive Caught Batter Out Double Play. Man nearcstHome out.

4 4 Caught Stealing Ball to Batter Out attempting to steal Second Base, only if unoccupied. 4 5 Single Batter Out Trying Runners advance 2 bases.

for Double 7 4 V G Balk by Pitcher W No Play on Batter Runners advance one base.

5 1 Passed Ball-on Catcher Ball to Batter Runners advance one base. 5 2 Stolen Bose Ball to Batter Double Steal if 2 men on. If 3 on, steel home only.

5 3 Hit by Pitcher Batter Takes First Base 5 4 Error Batter Takes Sec- Runners advance 2 bases.

0nd Base 5 5 Built-Safe Hit Batter Safe at First Runners advance one base.

5 6 Single 6 1 Single 6 2 Single Batter Safe at First Runners advance 2 bases. 6 3 Single e 4 Single 6 5 Double Battgr Safe at 800- All Runners score.

Triple E Batter Safe at Third All Runners score.

CODE CHART Clear area(without dot) Areas If Runners on Base Green Red 1 1 Pop Fly to Pitcher 1 2 Fly Caught by Catcher l 3 Fly to First Base 1 4 Fly to Second Base 1 5 Fly to Third Base Batter Out Runners hold their base 1 6 Fly to Short Stop 2 1 Fly to Left Field 2 2 Fly to Center Field 2 3 Fly to Right Field 2 4 Fly to Left Field 2 5 Fly to Center Field Batter Out Runner on Third scores. 2 6 Fly to Right Field Any others hold their base.

3 1 Grounder-Pitcher to First 3 2 Grounder-First Unassisted 3 3 Grounder-Second to First Batter Out 3 4 Grounder-Third to First Hit and Run Play. Any Runners advance one base. 3 5 Grounder-Short to First 3 6 Buntatcher to First 4 1 BuntPitcher to First Sacrifice Hit. Any 4 2 Bunt-Third to First Batter Out Runners advance one base. 4 3 BuntFirst Unassisted 4 4 Bunt-First to Pitcher 4 5 GrounderShort to First Double Play if man on first. Man on First out at Second. 4 6 Gr0under-Second to First Batter Out Other Runners advance 1 base.

5 1 Wild Pitch by Pitcher Ball to Batter Runners advance one base.

5 2 Stolen Base Strike on Batter Steal to Second base only if unoccupied.

5 3 Error I 5 4 Single Batter Safe at First Runners take one base. 5 5 Single If 2 out, take 2 bases.

5 6 Scratch Single Batter Safe at First 6 1 BuntSafe on First Runners take one base.

6 2 Single Batter Safe at First Runners take two bases. 6 3 Single 6 4 Double Batter Safe at Sec- Runners take 2bases.

0nd. Score from First if 2 out.

6 5 Double Battceir Safe at Sec- All Runners score.

6 6 Home Run Batter Scores All Runners score The rules for playing the game may be shown on the back of the code chart or the back of the score book 5| in which a record is made of the plays in the same manner as that of the regulation game. The rules follow those of the regulation game and need not be expanded herein. A suitable set of markers 52 of one color indicates the inning, the side at bat and the position of the players on the playing field. A similar set of markers 53 of different colors indicates the inning of the other team and the position of the players when that side is at bat. A third set of markers 54 of difierent colors is provided for indicating the strikes and balls on the batter and the number of outs for the team at hat.

The game may be played preferably by two, although a group of persons divided into two sides may also play the game, taking turns in manipulating the indicating device for the side at bat. By providing an indicating device with the ratio of areas indicating balls, strikes and fouls, as disclosed in the drawing, the strike and ball count on the batter will follow in the'same manner as in a ball game, while the play resulting when the ball is struck will be indicated by the open areas on the indicating device and from the corresponding reading obtained from the code chart. In this manner, substantially all of the plays which would take place in a regulation game can occur in the ball game of the present invention.

What is claimed is:

1. A same device for producing indications for the playing of a game simulating baseball inc1ud= ing a hollow die having 512; sides with, markings on ten: at the sides designating a ball, a strike,

a ball and a foul and two transparent windows marked to distinguish one from the other, and a pair of difierent colored dice within the hollow die visible through one or the other transparent tions may be obtained.

2. A game device for producing indications for the playing of a game simulating baseball including a hollow die having six sides with markings on four of the sides designating balls and strikes and two transparent windows marked to distinguish one from the other, and a pair of dice within the hollow die visible through one or the other transparent window from which number combinations may be obtained.

JAMES R. BROWN.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS window from which color and number combina- V

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2742290 *Mar 2, 1953Apr 17, 1956John W FasanaSimulated baseball game
US3198523 *Dec 19, 1962Aug 3, 1965Stimson Jonathan CWeighted dice
US3235261 *Nov 1, 1962Feb 15, 1966Doherty Edmond JBaseball game having resiliently actuated spinner
US3528661 *Aug 9, 1968Sep 15, 1970Warner Stanley ABaseball game
US3811677 *Apr 11, 1972May 21, 1974Saladrigas JGame played on stilts with nonround ball
US4261569 *Jul 16, 1979Apr 14, 1981Frohlich Stanley JBaseball board game
US4657254 *Jun 26, 1985Apr 14, 1987Renner David BParlor game apparatus for playing a simulated skill game involving multiple choice strategy
US5415412 *Sep 16, 1994May 16, 1995Mcmahon; Brad J.Apparatus for determining batting and base stealing outcomes in a baseball board game
US6170829Feb 12, 1999Jan 9, 2001Marshall HarveyBaseball game
US6193233 *Jan 21, 2000Feb 27, 2001Michael LipmanDice game
US6419227 *Jul 7, 2000Jul 16, 2002Thomas W. BarnhardtMethod and apparatus for playing a simulated baseball game
US6729619Oct 31, 2002May 4, 2004Mattel, Inc.Dice game
US6755416 *May 2, 2002Jun 29, 2004Mattel, Inc.Die-rolling device and game
US7296796 *Apr 22, 2005Nov 20, 2007Simon MackenzieMultiple dice device
US7658384Oct 15, 2007Feb 9, 2010Mattel, Inc.Die-rolling device and game
US8833768 *Oct 11, 2013Sep 16, 2014Jacob G. R. KramlichStorytelling game and method of play
Classifications
U.S. Classification273/244.1, 273/146, 273/145.00C
International ClassificationA63F3/00, A63F7/40
Cooperative ClassificationA63F3/00031
European ClassificationA63F3/00A4B