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Publication numberUS2528121 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateOct 31, 1950
Filing dateMay 20, 1948
Priority dateMay 20, 1948
Publication numberUS 2528121 A, US 2528121A, US-A-2528121, US2528121 A, US2528121A
InventorsDickinson Frank R
Original AssigneeBell Telephone Labor Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electrical connector
US 2528121 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Oct. 3l, 1950 F, R, DICKlNsoN 2,528,121

ELECTRICAL CONNECTOR Filed May 20, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 WEA/7o@ BV FRD/CK/NSON ATTORNEY Patented Oct. 31, 1950 UNITED sT-Ares ajram Orefice v Applicatienlvray 20, is4afseifia1 Natales 9 claims; (o1. 1734344)` This invention relates to electrical connectors y:

and more particularly to separable electrical conf nectors for a plurality of conductors.

Heretofore, in makingelectrical testsvof Vsome vacuum tubes v.before their .bases were applied, their lead-in fwires, ywhich may be iiexibleI and not readily attached to a socket, were temporarily fastened to clips on an insulating post attached to a socket. This arrangement was time consuming and exposed the operator to the hazard the establishment of electrical, connection with aplurality of i'lexible conductors.

A vacuum tubeadapter illustrative of one ein` bodimentof this invention overcomes theldiiculties above l mentioned by facilitatingV the insertion of the .flexible lead-in wires of an unbased 'Figi '-6 'is across-sectional view of another embodinient of the invention in which the casing is designed for attachment to a flat surface and thecasing closure and central post are in one piece;l l V Y Fig.v 7 is a cross-,sectional view of .anembodimentjof'thevinvention especially suitable for the electrical connection to a conventional electric lamp'cord plug;A and Fig.k 7A is an end view of one of the resilient springs shown in Fig; 7.

- Fig. 8 is a partial cross-sectional view of another embodiment of the invention in which a conventional telephone-type jack plug is attached to the casing of the device.

Referring now to Figs. l, 2, 3 and 4, the vacuum tube adapter YI l) includes -a conventional pronged vacuum tube base 20 for insertion in a vacuum tube socket. Base 20 is of an insulating material as, for example, a phenolic condensation product,

` supporting' a pluralityfof metallic conducting tube into apertures in the adapter or their removal therefrom. The adapter is designed for insertion into a conventional tube socket for electrical connection to the testing circuits. This construction encloses the vlead-in wires and eliminates the hazard of electrical shock to the opere ator.

A feature of this invention relates to means for gripping the conductors after they are inserted through the apertures of the device.

Another feature ofY this invention relates to means for simultaneously compressing a plurality of resilient springs within the device.

The nature of the present invention `willbe more fully Vunderstood from a consideration of ing drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view partly in cross Y section of a vacuum tube adapter'illustrativepf one embodiment of the invention; f

lo the embodiments illustrated in theja'ccornpany-L Fig. 2 is a plan view of the adapterof Figg l plugs 22 extending through and mouldedtherein. A cylindrical axial guide post 24 forms a unitary portion `ofthe moulded base 20; central post composed of a clear plastic material Vas, for example, vinylite, hasan enlarged cylindrical end 32 inserted in a cupped portion 2 6,of base '20. Base 20 isinserted into the lower endo`"`casing40 which composed of van insulatingmateriaL" as for example, phenol fibre. Base 20,' centralpost 30 and casing 4 0 'arerigidly secured together by machine screws 4'2'wl'iich pass through clearance'holesin cup .26 and' casing MJ andare threaded vinto tapped holes`44 .in end 32 of central post 30. f Y f -Cylinder 50, shown in perspective view in Fig. 4,"is' composed' of the same plastic material as post .30 andis rigidly attached to upperend 34 thereof by a machine screw 52 which passes through a clearance'hole 54 in cylinder 5-and threads 'i'r1"t ifa tapped hole 35 `in central post 39. A cylinder composed of the' same plasticmaterial 'as post 30' rests' upon the upper surface of cylinder ,5t and forms a closure forthe upper end of casingv '40 and is secured thereto by machine screws'` 6 2 W'hichp'ass through clearance holes in casing'dand thread-into Vtapped holes 64 in 'cylinder'll;"1CentralA post 30', cylinder 5l) and cylinder 60 arelhel'd in rigid alignment by metallic pins '66',68 -iitted tightly in perforations through cylinder (i0,vr and in perforations' 56, 58 through cylinder 5U andin aligned holes in post 30and terminating therein.`Vvv i :Asplu'rality of holes 38 are drilled and tapped radially to the axis of post 30g Avplurality of A cylindrical Y resilient springs 18, 88 are attached to post 38 by machine screws 35 which thread into holes 38. The upper ends 12 of springs 10 are bent normal to the axis of post 38 and enter slots 14 in cylinder 50. The upper ends 82 of springs 80 similarly are bent normal to the axis of post 38 and enter slots 84, Springs 18 are shorter than springs 88 so that slots 14 may be formed in the lower face of cylinder 58 and slots 84 may be formed in the upper face thereof to avoid interference between adjacent springs and thus permit inclusion of more springs in a given space. Resilient springs 18, 88 are formed with portions 1|, 8| adjacent to the bent ends 12, 82 in parallel relation to the axis of post 38 but apart therefrom. Springs 18, 88 are depressible for moving their parallel portions 1|, 8| closer to post 38 'for thrusting their bent ends 12, 82 further into slots 14, 84 respectively.

A cylindrical sleeve 90 composed of insulating material, as for example, a phenolic condensation product, surrounds springs 18, 88 substantially at their middle portions with the inner edge 9| of its upper circular face 92 making contact with angular portions 15, 85 of springs 10, 88. Sleeve 98 is slidable reciprocally and also revolvable on the inner surface of casing 48. A cylindrical metallic sleeve 93 surrounds casing48 and is slidable recprocally and also revolvable on the outer surface of casing 48. A plurality of helical slots 94, two of which are partially visible in Fig. l, are cut through the casing 48. Pins 95 are threaded into holes 96 in sleeve 93 adjacent to each helical slot 94 and each has a shank 91 extending through a helical slot 94 in casing 48 and has a smaller shank 98 entering a hole in sleeve 98. Pins 95 couple sleeve 93 tosleeve 98 and when sleeve 93 is rotated about casing 48 the resulting motion imparts a similar motion to sleeve 98. Pins 95 being restrained in helical slots 94 cause reciprocal motion of sleeve 93 and sleeve 98.

Reciprocal motion of sleeve 98 results in movement of springs 18, 88. When pins 95 are in the position shown in Fig. l, Shanks 91 are at the upper end of Vtheir travel in helical slots 94 in one direction, sleeve 98'has been reciprocated to the highest point in its travel and its inner edge 9| has pressed springs 18, 88 inward toward post 38. When sleeve 93 is now rotated, pins 91` sliding in helical slots 94 cause sleeve 98 to move downward, and in so doing inner edge 9| slides downward over the surface of angular portions 15, 85 of springs 18, 88 allowing springs 18, 88 to spring radially outward in a direction away from the axis of post 38. This motion is arrested when Shanks 91 of pins 95 strike the lower ends 98 of helical slots 94. Y v

As shown in Fig. 2, springs 18, 80 have apertures 99 in their ends 12, 82. When the springs 18, 88 are depressed by sleeve 98 to the positionsshown in Fig. l, apertures 99 are in alignment with apertures |88, one of which is shown in the crosssectional portion of Fig. 3. Apertures |88 extend through cylinder 58 and cylinder 58 into post 38 and terminate within the lbody of post 38.

The operation of this embodiment ofthe invention is as follows: With apertures 99 in alignment with apertures |88, wires connecting to a device that is to be electrically tested may be readily inserted in the latten For example, a plurality of lead-in wires extending -from the envelope of an unbased vacuum tube may be inserted in apertures |88 into the body of post 30, to a point substantially below the lower surfaces of slots 14, 84. Rotation or" sleeve 93 and resulting movement of pin shanks 91 to the lower ends 98 of helical slots 94 will move sleeve 98 downward and allow spring ends 12, 82 to move outward radially in a direction away fro-m the axis of post 38. The lead-in wires of the vacuum tube in apertures |88 will restrain the outward radial movement of spring ends 12, 82 and rm electrical contact will be established between the lead-in wires of the vacuum tube and the re- K silient springs 18, 88. Rotation of sleeve 93 and the return of pin shank 91 to the position shown in Fig. 1 will release the lead-in wires in apertureslll. I

Fig. 5 shows a modication of the embodiment of this invention shown in Figs` l, 2, 3 and 4 in which the closure H8 of outer casing |85 has a plurality of slots all in the same plane into which bent ends H2 of the resilient springs H3 reciprocate in a horizontal plane when sleeve |4 is reciprocated by movement of shank ||5 of pin H8 in helical slot H1 in casing |85 when sleeve I I8 is rotated about casing |85. Wires to be electrically connected to this device may be inserted in apertures |9 of closure |8 and through apertures |28 in springs ||2 into apertures 2| of central post |22. Spring ends H2 will grip such wires when sleeve H4 is reciprocated downward by rotation of sleeve H8 about casing |85, and will be again released when sleeve H8 is restored to the position shown in Fig. 5.

Another embodiment of this invention is shown in Fig. 6 in which the cylindrical casing |38 has a flat mounting surface 3| and a plurality of slots |32 are formed in central post |33 which is supported by its upper end |34 which forms a closure for casing |38. The bent ends |35,of resilient springs 36 have apertures |31 which align with apertures |38 in central post |33 when in the position shown in Fig. 6. Wires inserted inV apertures |38 will be Vgripped by spring ends |35 when sleeve |39 is reciprocated downward by rotation of sleeve |48 about casing |38 which movement will slide shank 4| of pin |42 in hel ical slot |43 and the wires will be released when sleeve |40 is restored to the position shown in Fig. 6.

Fig. 'lshows another embodiment of the invention in the form of a socket in which a pair of contacts are provided for making electrical connection with a conventional two-conductor lamp cord plug. A feature of this arrangement is the provision of means for locking the contacts of the cord plug in the socket to prevent their removal therefrom. Cylindrical casing |88 lrigidly supports a central post |6| by means of shoulder |82 attached by screw |63. Resilient springs |88, |65 are rigidly attached to central post ll by screws |86 and have bent ends |81, |88 which extend into slots |69, |18 respectively in post |`8|. Apertures |1|, |12 having rectangular cross-sections enter central post 8| from the end |13 thereof. AApertures |14, |15 in spring'ends |61, |68 respectively are in alignment with apertures |1|,V 12 respectively in the position shown in Fig. '7. Contact pins |18, 11 of a conventional lamp cord attachment plug |18 can be inserted into apertures |1I', |12.

Contact pins |16, |11 have round apertures |86, |81 near their outer ends. as is conventional in lcommercial cord plugs. Bent ends |61, |88 of resilient springs |64, |95 have prongs |88, |89 extending radially away from the axis of central post |6|. Rotation of sleeve |19 about casing |68 will move sleeve |88'to the right as shank |8| of pin |82 slidesinlhelical slot L83. yThismoton of sleeve v|180 will allow springends |61, [E8-:fand prongs |38, A89 .to move outward away from the axis of central post |BI. 1Prongs.|8,8,'f|f8.9 will-enter apertures |86, |81 .respectively of cordplug lcontact pins |76, when the latter have been inserted inv apertures |:'||,'.l'|2 respectively and will lock contactpins .116, l'lltoprevent Ytheir withdrawal from socket |60. When sleeve H9 fand pin |02 are restored tothepositio'n shown 20.6 of casing and nut;202 draws shoulder120`| of .sleeve 204 .into .secure :contact 4with inner surface :208 of the endof casingl20l. Centralpost r2 09 isrigidly attached to casing 20 I' bythe cylindricalend 2| .0 of central -post200 andis securely Y Resilient springs .212, vl2|3 arerigidly attached to central post .20.9 by-screws .2|4 which enter threaded'holes inthe body of central post 209. Bentends 2|5,"2|S-of springs 2|2, 2|3 enter slots 2|?, 2| :8. Aperturas 12|9, i220 drilled fromface 2 l0 of;posts.20`9 enter the body of post 209 and are intersected by slots 2|'|, 2|8 respectively. Apertures 22|', 222 in spring ends 2|5, 2|6a1ign with apertures 2 t9, 220 when springs 2 2,`2|3 Varein the position shown in Fig. 8. Conducting Wires 223, 224 can b e inserted in apertures 2|.9 220 passing through apertures 22|, 222 of spring ends 2|5, 2|5 respectively. If sleeve 225 is then rotated about the outer surface-of casing 20| pin226 will move its Vshank 221,in helical slot 228 and shank :,229 will cause sleeve 230V to move tothe right which will .allow spring ends 2|l', 2|`8 to move outwardly away from the axis of post 209 and conductors 223, 224 will be gripped by spring ends 22|, 222 respectively. Conductors 223, 224 may then be released by rotating sleeve 225 to the position sh'own in Fig. 8.

Within the .casing 20| spring 2|2 is electrically connected to plug sleeve 201| and spring 2I3 is electrically connected to tip 23| which extends through and is insulated from sleeve 204 in the manner conventional in telephone plugs.

While the invention, has been disclosed with reference to specific embodiments, it is to be understood that it is to be considered as limited in scope by the appended claims only.

What is claimed is.:

l. A separable connector comprising a sleeve member, a closure on one end of said member having a plurality of spaced apertures and kradial slots intersecting said apertures, a central post within said member carried by said closure, a plurality of resilient springs attached to said post and having bent ends extending thro-ugh said slots, a reciprocable collar encompassing said springs, and means including a rotatable ring on said sleeve member and coupled to said collar for reciprocating said collar.

2. A separable connector comprising a base, a central post anda cylindrical casing attached at one end to said base, a closure for the opposite end of said casing and attached to the opposite :end of said .'post, said closurefnaving agplural-ty of kspaced :apertures therein, said post Ahaving a plurality of parallel apertures spaced in alignment with :the spaced apertures in said closure, said ,post having radial slots intersecting said apertures, :aplurality of` resilient springs attached to said ipostandahaving their freeends formed normal ,togthegbody thereof, said vfree ends exvtendingintosaid slots, a reciprocable collar encompassingsaid springs, and an exterior concentric ring on vsaid casing coupled to saidcollar for reciprocablyfmoving said collar.

3. :Anelectricalconnector comprising a cylinldricalcasing, closures at both `ends of Ysaid casing, a central post extending between said vclosures within said casing, one fof said closures having fa plurality :of spaced apertures :therethrough and having a plurality of radial gslots .simultaneously in said slots.

.4. -A separable electrical .connector comprising a central column, abase .attached to one endof said lcolu'mn, .an outerfcasing :attached to -said vbase,..a member attached totheopposite end of said column formingaclosurefor said casing, said column .having aplurality of -spacedradial slots inthe said opposite-end thereof, said closure `having an aperture normal to. each slot extending through said closure, said central column having afplurality of .parallel aperturesspaced in alignment with the apertures in said closure, a resilient springsfor.- each slot attached to said column near .said base andfhavingthe freeend bent normal tothe. axis. of said columnand extending radially intothe slotforreciprocal-movement therein, the

bent end of each spring'having an apertureposil 4tioned to align with one of said parallel apertures whensaid spring end is fully moved into said slot, a reciprocating and partially revolvable collar within said casing for reciprocating the spring ends in said slots and means for imparting reciprocating and partially revolving motion to said collar.

5. A separable connector comprising a circular sleeve member, a central member having one end expanded to form a closure for one end of 4said sleeve member, said central member having a plurality of spaced radial slots adjacent to the expanded end thereof and having a plurality of apertures extending through said expanded end spaced to intersect said slots, a plurality of resilient springs attached to said central member and having one end of each spring bent normal to the body thereof and positioned for reciprocal movement of the bent end in one of said slots, the bent end of each of said springs having an aperture positioned for alignment with an aperture in said central member when said bent end is thrust fully into a slot, an inner cylindrical collar engaging said springs within said sleeve member slidable A reciprocally and partially revolvable on the inner surface of said sleeve member, a helical slot through said sleeve member at a position substantially opposite the middle portion of said springs', an outer cylindrical collar. on the outer surface of said sleeve member slidable reciprocally and partially revolvable upon the outer surface of said sleeve member, and a pin coupling said outer and inner collars'through said helical slot Whereby motion of said outer collar may impart motion to said inner collar.

6. A separable connector comprising a cylindrical sleeve, a pillar coaxial with said sleeve and having a cylindrical end portion forming a closure for one end of said sleeve, said pillar having a plurality of spaced radial slots adjacent to said cylindrical end portion thereof vand having a plurality of apertures through said end portion parallel to the axis of said sleeve with each slot bisecting one of said apertures which terminate Within said pillar, a plurality of resilient springs attached to said pillar and having ends bent into said slots and positioned for radial movement into said slots when said springs are pressed against said pillar, the bent end of'each spring having an aperture positioned for alignment With one of said spaced apertures when the spring is pressed against said pi1lar, and reciprocal means including a partially rotatable ring for simultaneously pressing said springs against said pillar.

7. A separable electrical connector comprising a cylindrical'cup, a closure for the open end of said cup having a post extending coaxially into said cup, said closure having a plurality of spaced apertures extending therethrough into said post, said post having a radial slot adjacent to said closure for each aperture and intersecting said aperture, a resilient spring for each slot attached to said post and having an end bent normal to the body thereof and extending into the slot, the

Vbent end of each spring having an aperture for alignment with a spaced aperture when said spring is pressed against said post, and means including a reciprocable and partially rotatable ring for simultaneously pressing said springs against said post.

8. A separable electrical connector comprising a-cylindrical cup, a vclosure for the open end of said' cup having a post extending coaxially into said cup, said post having a plurality of spaced apertures extending through said closure and having a radial slot adjacent to said closure for each aperture and intersecting the aperture, a

resilient spring for each slot attached to said post and having an end bent normal to the body thereof and extending into the slot, the bent end of each spring having an aperture for alignment With a spaced aperture when said spring is pressed against said post, an inner cylindrical collar engaging said springs Within said cup slidable reciprocally and partially revolvable on the inner surface of said cup, said cup having a helical slot therethrough positioned substantially opposite the middle portion of said springs, an outer cylindrical collar on the outer surface of said cup slidable reciprocally and partially revolvable upon the outerl surface of said cup, and a pin coupling said outer and inner collars through said helical slot whereby motion of said outer collar may impart motion to said inner collar.

9. A separable electrical connector comprising a cup, a closure for the open end of said cup, said closure having a pair of apertures extending into said closure and having a radial slot adjacent said closure for each aperture and intersecting the aperture, a resilient spring for each slot attached to said post and having an end bent at an angle to the body thereof and extending into the slot, the bent end of each spring having an aperture for alignment with one of said pair of apertures when said spring is pressed against said post and having'a prong extending into the aperture of said spring in the direction radially outward from the axis of said post, and means including a reciprocable and partially rotatable ring for simultaneously pressing said springs against said post.

FRANK R. DICKINSON.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the le of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,637,836 Rubin Aug. 2, 1927 2,051,425 Schlums Aug. 18, 1936 2,075,632 Zuckerman Mar. 20, 1937

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1637836 *Jun 24, 1922Aug 2, 1927 Cord connecter
US2051425 *Jun 25, 1934Aug 18, 1936Schlums Otto WElectric plug
US2075632 *Nov 26, 1935Mar 30, 1937Irving HaasPlug electric switch
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2738483 *Apr 1, 1952Mar 13, 1956Sylvania Electric ProdAdaptor with cam actuation
US2766435 *Feb 2, 1953Oct 9, 1956French Harry HElectrical connector
US2814790 *Feb 17, 1955Nov 26, 1957Sylvania Electric ProdGravity insertion tube socket
US2952003 *Oct 26, 1955Sep 6, 1960Pomona Electronics Co IncCoupler
US3348188 *Jun 28, 1965Oct 17, 1967Eastman Kodak CoFlash extender
US5277613 *May 18, 1992Jan 11, 1994Neward Theodore CElectrode junction assembly
US5427543 *May 2, 1994Jun 27, 1995Dynia; Gregory G.Electrical connector prong lock
US6136232 *Aug 13, 1999Oct 24, 2000Xylon Ceramic Materials Inc.Electrical conductivity can be controlled in range to provide for its use as an electrostatic dissipative or ?esd? material; in semiconductor industry
US6669871Nov 19, 2001Dec 30, 2003Saint-Gobain Ceramics & Plastics, Inc.ESD dissipative ceramics
US7094718Oct 20, 2003Aug 22, 2006Saint-Gobain Ceramics & Plastics, Inc.ESD dissipative ceramics
US7579288Jul 20, 2005Aug 25, 2009Saint-Gobain Ceramics & Plastics, Inc.Method of manufacturing a microelectronic component utilizing a tool comprising an ESD dissipative ceramic
US8727817 *May 4, 2011May 20, 2014Sorin Crm S.A.S.Screwless quick system for connecting a lead connector to a generator of an implantable medical device
US20110275253 *May 4, 2011Nov 10, 2011Sorin Crm S.A.S.Screwless Quick System For Connecting A Lead Connector To A Generator Of An Implantable Medical Device
Classifications
U.S. Classification439/269.2, 439/789, 439/346, 439/656, 200/51.00R, 439/269.1
International ClassificationG01R31/24, G01R31/25
Cooperative ClassificationG01R31/25
European ClassificationG01R31/25