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Publication numberUS2528690 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 7, 1950
Filing dateApr 26, 1947
Priority dateApr 26, 1947
Publication numberUS 2528690 A, US 2528690A, US-A-2528690, US2528690 A, US2528690A
InventorsRobert M Foushee
Original AssigneeNat Slug Rejectors Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paramagnetic coin separator
US 2528690 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Nov. 7, 1950 FQUSHEE 2,528,690

PARAMAGNETIC com SEPARATOR Filed April 26, 1947 2Sheeis-Sheet 1 IN VEN TOR.

Nov. 7, 1950 R. M. FOUSHEE 2,528,690

' PARAMAGNETIC COIN SEPARATOR Filed.April 26, 1947 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

Patented Nov. 7, 1950 PARAMAGNETIC COIN SEPARATOR- Robert M. Foushee, St. Louis, Mo.,.assignor to National Slug Rejectors, Inc., St. Louis, Mo., a corporation of Missouri Application April 26, 1947, Serial No. 744,217

8 Claims.

This invention in general relates to coin selecting apparatus and more particularly to a device for sensitively separating coins having different magnetic properties. In previous devices of this general character it has been common practice to separate coins having paramagnetic properties from coins having diamagnetic properties but solution of the problem of separating coins hav ing slightly different magnetic properties has long been desired such as separating a Canadian piece from a United States 5 piece both of which are paramagnetic.

This invention is directed to a structure for separating coins having paramagnetic properties similar to the Canadian 5 piece from other coins having paramagnetic and diamagnetic properties and constitutes the principal object of the invention. Y

A further object of the invention is the provision of an adjustable magnetic path for testing coins propelled by gravity having different magnetic properties and releasing them in corresponding different predetermined trajectories.

Another object of the invention is a provision of a structure combinin a magnetic testing means for projecting coins in paths corresponding to the magnetic properties of the coins and a second impacting means for arresting the movement of coins prior to engagement with a second magnetic testing means for guiding acceptable coins in a particular path. I

These and other objects in one embodiment of the invention are described and shown-in the following description and drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevation of the separator;

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary front elevation same as Fig. 1 with covers removed; 7

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary cross sectional end view taken thru section line 3-3, Fig. 1;

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken thru section line 4-4, Fig. 1;

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken thru section line 5-5, Fig. 1;

Figs. 6 and '7 same as Fig. 2, showing difieren coin paths.

Fig. 1 shows the entire assembly constructed within a frame I. A gate 2 hinged to the frame I by pin 3 is urged into close proximity to the inside surface of frame I by spring 4 andv pro vides a coin entry shown by arrow e in which coins to be tested are deposited. A chute 5 secured to frame I provides a rejection passageway indicated by arrow 1*. A plate 6 secured to the frame I provides a cover for the internal elements to be hereinafter described.

Referring, to Fig. 3 a guide plate I secured in spaced relation to the inside surface of frame I by spacers 8 and 9 retained by screws 8a and 917 provides a passageway therebetween for the movement of coins deposited therein. 7 I

Referring to Figs. 2, 3, and 5, a coinentrance runway I0 integrally mounted to gate 2' provides means for conducting a coin propelled by gravity to the upper edge-of a magnet pole-piece I I which is secured to plate I by rivets I2I2' as shown in sectional view, Fig..4. A coin arrester I3 is loosely supported between the inner surface of frame I ;and plate Iby spacer 8 and. a projection I4 loosely engaging a hole I6 in plate I. Arrester plate I3 iswprovided' with an angled slop:

ing'edge I5 as shown.

Referring to Fig. 5 a nonmagnetic bushing I1 is secured to plate I, as shown and provided with an adjustable cylindrical permanent magnet I9 which is capable of adjustable positioning along the bore of bushing I! by screw I8.

Referring to Fig. 4 anon-magnetic bushing 20 is secured in plate I and provided with a longig tudinal adjustable permanent magnet 2I in its bore secured byv screw 22. The inner end of the magnet 2| may be adjustably positioned with respect to one side of pole-piece II as shown. The spacer 9 shown in Fig. 2v is provided with two sloping edges '23 and 24, the junction of which serves as an abutment 25.

In order to insure the proper separation of magnetic coins, the magnet 2| is adjusted with relation to the pole-piece I I to cause coins having certain magnetic properties to be deflected from the contour. of its working edge at predetermined ent in the coin will be substantially absorbed. The coin will then descend the runway I5 and contact the projecting end of magnet 19 whereupon the coin will roll around the periphery of the magnet and descend in a free trajectory to the edge 24 of spacer'9 and then into the acceptance passageway a.

Referring to Fig. 6 under the assumption that a diamagnetic coin is deposited on the runway it will descend along the upper surface of the pole-piece I l and because of the lack of magnetic attraction between the pole-piece and the coin it will descend ina-Ifreetrajectory to=the upper edge I of the coin arrester l3 and thereby lose substantially al1 of its kinetic energy. The coin will then descend along the sloping edge 15 passing over magnet I9 because of lack ofymagnetic attraction therebetween to descend in a free trajectory to the sloping edge 23xofzspacer 9 and continue its descent intorejection passageway r as shown.

Referring to Fig. 7 and under the-assumption that a coin having excessive paramagnetic properties is deposited on runway Ill it will descend along the upper surface of pole-piece II and continue to move'aboutthe lower arcua-teedge ofpole piec'e H until'it-assumes a freetrajectory directly-to the sloping edgeZS 'ofspacer fl 'wh'ereupon it will "further" descend to the rejection DE S W Y 1 v "It is "apparent from the preceding operation thattheshape of the arcuate contour and the adjustment of magnet 2! -with"'respect -to the pole-piece provides'fia means for exceedingly sensitive separation of "paramagnetic coins 'havingfdifferent'magnetic'properties.

' Thepositidriing of magnet 19 "for proper attractive strength also "contributes to the sensi- 'ty of selection between coins ghaving slightly different paramagneticproperti'es. j

i a It is also to benoted'thatthearrester 'lt-dces not serve the-purpose ofrebounjd anvil as is-'-commonly'v employed in "coin ir'ejectors buton*the -contrary because 'o fits loose mounting it is used net positioned in said frame adjacent ;to 'said pole "piece for magnetizing said pole piece, an

"impact absorber means loosely secured to said frame in said testing passageway, the upper 'e'dge'of said means forming-a sloping runway, .said impact absorber 'being located below said permanent magnet the space between said magnet and said impactebsorber forming a' gravitational. drop portion of said "testing passageway whereby both an acceptable'pararna'gnetic coin, when-leaving said permanent magnet descend 'in a freetrajectory path into engagement with the lowersloping edge of--said impact absorber and 4 descending on said entrance runway will roll around said outer surface of said pole piece a predetermined distance and descend in a free vertical trajectory to the upper edge of said absorber means and then roll along said upper edge and partially around said arcuate surface of said second magnet sufliciently far to fall into said acceptance passageway.

2. A coin separator comprising a frame, means in said frame sequentially forming an entrance runway, a testing passageway and an acceptance 7 passageway, a pole piece having an arcuate outer surface forming a descending continuation of said entrance runway, a permanent magnet positioned in said frame adjacent to said pole piece for magnetizing said pole piece, an impact absorbenmeans loosely secured to said frame in said testing passageway, the upper edge of said .-means formingia sloping runway, said impact absorber "being located below said permanent magnet, the space between said magnet and said impact absorber forming a gravitational drop portionof said testing passageway whereby both an acceptable paramagnetic coin when leaving said permanent magnet descend in a free trajectory path into engagement with the lower sloping edge of said imp-act absorber and a-diamagnetic coin when leaving said permanent -magnet will descend in a free trajectory path into engagementwith the upper-"sloping edge of said impact absorber, a second-permanent'magnet having an arcuate outer surface-positioned in said frame in-'proXimity*to the lower end'ofsaid upper slcp ing edge of said absorber means, -whereby an acceptable paramagnetic-coin descending-'on safd entrance runway will roll around sai'douter surface of said pole piece a predetermined dista-nce and desc'end in a'freavertical trajectory to the upper edge "of=said abs'orberfmeansand -then roll along said upper edge and partially around said arcuate surf-ace of 'said second-magnet suificiently "far to fall into=said*acceptance passageway, and

a spacer located below said second permanent magnet and having oppositely-sloping upper surthe opposite ends'ofsaid'spacerf I a 3. A coinseparatorcomprising aframe'means in said frame sequentially forming an entrance runway, a testing passageway and an acceptance said permanent .magnet-descend in afree-trajeca 'diamagnetic coin when leaving said permanent magnet will descend in a free trajectory path into engagement 7 with the lup'per sloping edge of said impact absorber-a second permanent magnet having an arcuate' outer surface positioned in said 'framefin proximity to'the lower tory pathzinto engagement with-the lower vsloping edge of said impact.absorberand-adiamagnetic coin awhen leavingsaid permanentzmagnet will descend in -.a rfree trajectory path'into engagement :with the upper sloping edge of "said impact absorber, whereby an acceptable par-amagnetic :coin' descending on *said entrance runway'will "roll around" said outer surface ofsaid pole 'piece apredeterminedi distance and descend inira free verticartrajectory"to the"upper='-edg'e -o'f said zabsorbera'means and *Zthen rroll-ia'long- --;sa'id faces'extending from-an apex locatedbetween upper edge suificiently far to fall into said acceptance passageway,

The following references are of record in the ROBERT M. FOUSHEE.

REFERENCES CITED file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Wurzbach Oct. 22, 1929 Number 6 Name Date Gottfried Dec. 20, 1932 Gottfried May 2, 1933 Gilchrist Oct. 24, 1933 Gilchrist Aug. 14, 1934 Stillman Mar. 12, 1935 Gottfried Dec. 15, 1936 Smith Nov. 29, 1938 Tratsch et a1 Mar. 28, 1939 Mills Nov. 28, 1939 Hoyt Feb. 4, 1941 Mills May 4, 1943

Patent Citations
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US1891640 *Sep 16, 1930Dec 20, 1932Cameo Scale CorpVending machine
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US1931579 *Feb 13, 1931Oct 24, 1933Rowe Slug Ejector Co LtdMultiple coin separator
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US1993757 *Jan 5, 1933Mar 12, 1935Camco Scale CorpFraud preventive for check controlled apparatus
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US2318410 *Oct 29, 1940May 4, 1943Bell Telephone Labor IncCoin chute
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3672481 *Dec 8, 1969Jun 27, 1972Coin Verifiers Co LtdVariable magnetic flux coin-sensing devices
US4421220 *Nov 9, 1982Dec 20, 1983Sintered Metals, Inc.Token mechanism with magnetic separation means
US5291980 *Mar 26, 1992Mar 8, 1994Asahi Seiko Co., Ltd.Device for sorting game coin by paramagnetic properties
DE2308776A1 *Feb 22, 1973Aug 30, 1973Mars IncVorrichtung zum flaechigen stapeln von muenzen
DE2455106A1 *Nov 21, 1974May 28, 1975Mars IncMuenzautomat
EP0671710A1 *Mar 8, 1994Sep 13, 1995Asahi Seiko Kabushiki KaishaCoin selecting apparatus
WO1983001854A1 *Nov 16, 1982May 26, 1983Sintered Metals IncToken mechanism with magnetic separation means
Classifications
U.S. Classification194/325
Cooperative ClassificationG07D5/00
European ClassificationG07D5/00