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Publication numberUS2528715 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateNov 7, 1950
Filing dateFeb 6, 1947
Priority dateFeb 6, 1947
Publication numberUS 2528715 A, US 2528715A, US-A-2528715, US2528715 A, US2528715A
InventorsWagner George B
Original AssigneeBeekman Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Refrigerated shipping container
US 2528715 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 6-, 1947 INVEWTOR.

Wagner B 8 m 0 w Nov. 7, 1950 G- B. WAGNER 2,528,715

REFRIGERATED SHIPPING CONTAINER Filed Feb. 6, 1947 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I mm m x. I z

Fig. 7.

INVENTOR. G eorge B. Wagner BY v-YJJZE' K a? Patented Nov. 7, 1950 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE REFRIGERATED SHIPPING CONTAINER George B. Wagner, Holbrook, Mass., assignor to Beekman Industries, Inc., New York, N. Y., a corporation of New York Application February 6, 1947, Serial No. 726,939

11 Claims. 1 r

This invention relates to improved shipping containers for perishable products and to a novel method of so packaging perishable products that they are maintained at predetermined tempera-,- ture and thereby preserved during shipment. The invention furthermore contemplates the packaging and shipping of perishable products under controlled refrigeration in containers of such moderate cost as permits discarding them after use, thereby eliminating the expense and inconvenience of returning the containers which practice has been found impractical and economically prohibitive.

My invention contemplates the packaging of perishable products within an insulation blanket associated with a carton of corrugated paperboard or the like, together with a refrigerating unit embodying a block of dry ice enclosed within a gas-tight and insulated box vented at predetermined pressure. The preserving of perishable products requires the maintenance of predetermined temperatures and these temperatures vary for different products. My invention not only admits of maintaining the predetermined temperature required but furthermore provides for maintaining this temperature at such minimum cost that the entire container can be discarded after use. Certain products, such as live lobsters, requires the maintenance of a predetermined atmosphere in the storage chamber and for such purpose my invention furthermore contemplates venting the refrigerating unit to the outside atmosphere.

The production of an improved shipping container of the nature above defined, together with a method of packaging perishable products for shipping under controlled refrigeration, comprises the primary object of the invention.

The carton preferably employed in my shipping container embodies two tubular walls of paperboard in telescopic relation and each wall embodies four fiat panels each pivotally attached along a fold line to the two adjacent panels, and a tubular blanket of insulation material in telescopic relation with and between the walls, the panels and blanket being movable about the fold lines from a flat collapsed relation to an open position in which the panels and blanket form a chambered carton and the outer wall and blanket having foldable extensions on their ends for closing the ends of the container. An improved carton of this nature is not only economical to produce and assemble but furthermore provides a shipping container fully insulating the storage chamber. The production of an improved carton of this nature comprises a further object of the invention.

These and other features of the invention will be more readily understood and appreciated from the following detailed description of preferred embodiments thereof selected for purposes of illustration and shown, in the accompanying drawings, in which, V

Fig. 1 is a perspective view, partially broken away, of a package ready for shipment and embodying my invention,

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view through the package before closing its top end,

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary perspective View of the package carton blanks in flat assembled relation,

Fig. 4 is a planview of the package with its top end partially closed,

Fig. 5 is a perspective view of the refrigerating unit elements in disassembled relation,

Fig. 6 is an enlarged sectional view taken on line 6-6 of Fig. 2,

Fig. '7 is an enlarged sectional view through the venting tube of the refrigerating unit,

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 4, and

Fig. 9 is a top edge view of the inner wall In.

The primary object of the invention is to package perishable products for shipment with maximum economy of expense and weight and under such controlled refrigeration as will preserve the products, and furthermore to provide a novel shipping container for this purpose which can be discarded with economy after use. In the accompanying drawings I have illustrated a preferred embodiment of my invention for effecting these objects.

The shipping container illustrated in Fig. 1 comprises a carton embodying two relatively spaced inner and outer walls I0 and I2 of corrugated paperboardand disposed between these two Walls is a continuous blanket M of insulation -materia1 comprising hair felt or other suitable insulation sandwiched between two paper facings as illustrated in Fig. 6. For economy of production and assembly, the walls I0 and I2 and blanket M are constructed in tubular form and pre-assembled while in flat condition as illustrated in Fig. 3. Each of the walls IE] and [2 comprises four flat panels pivotally attached to each other along fold lines I5 at the margins of the panels. Furthermore, the outer Wall I2 has end flaps IS on each of its panels and the blanket M has extensions [8 at its ends co-extensive with the flaps [6. The assembly also includes a waterproof paper bag 20 in folded flat condition and telescopically assembled within the innerwall H). The carton is set up (by first assembling the flat tubular units I0, l2 and I4 and the bag 20 7 into the. telescopic relation illustrated in Fig. 3.

This assembly is then raised from the fiat blank position to the open tubular position in which the panels and blanket form a chambered carton. The end of the carton corresponding tothe bot,- tom end of the paper bag ZIJis then closed to form the bottom of the container. The end flaps I6 and extensions [8 are identical at the two ends of the assembly 'andwhen folded together provide fully closed and insulated end walls for the container. The end closure is effected by first folding two of the end flaps l6 inwardly as-indi- Certain products, such for example as live lobsters, would be destroyed if subjected to an the plates The-two tubes 34 and 50 are concated in Figs. 4 and 5, then folding the blanket extensions 18 inwardly, as illustrated, completely to cover the end area, then folding the remaining two end flaps 16 onto the folded blanket and taping their margins at '22. This operationcompletesand s'eals the bottom end of the container. The bag 20 is then opened and its dimensionsare such'as to fit closely-the inner wall of the chamber 4 r I Tliecontainer as thus prepared is ready to renected by a rubber tube 56 and the tape 54 is punctured topermit exhausting of the CO2.

Itis desirable that a uniform temperature be .maintained in the'packag'ed product throughout the storagechamber and I have found that this I is facilitated by increasing the heat conductivity of the carton surrounding the chamber. A preferred method which I have employed for accomplishing this object comprises the insertionof a plurality of spaced copper wires 58 in the ceive within the open bag 20 the perishable products-to be-shipped. "It is also desirable that the container shall remain dry andfree' frompon-f t-arhinatio'n or softening by possible contact with wetsur'faces'an'd' as a' precaution for this purpose I preferably provide a waterproof boot "2'4 fitting tightly and resiliently about the bottom of the container. This boot can be made of rubber or'any suitable resilient and waterproofplastic as will be understood. a 1

When the product to be shipped has'been disposed within the bag 29, a refrigerating unit 26 is placed in' the top of the chamber and supported on the inner wall [0 as illustrated and hereinafter described; This unit contains a block 28 of dry ice and is constructed tomaintain a desired predetermined preserving temperature in the chamber. Therefrigerating unit illustrated comprises a corrugated paperboard jacket 30 closely fitting and containing the block 28 of dry ice. The jacket 30 is contained in and closely fits a gas-tight'box 32, preferably of sheet metal, having a vent tube 34 carried'on and extending outwardly from one ofits walls. The box 30 is sealedgas tight by soldering a sheet metal end closure (not shown) over the open end (Fig. 5)

' after the block ZS-30 has been inserted. The

box is contained in and closely fits a corrugated paper jacket 36 slotted at 31 to receive the tube 34. The jacket 36 is provided with end closure flaps 38 and the unit is supported in the container by engaging two of these flaps overthe inner wall It! in a manner positively supporting the box on this wall. 5

Thetube 34 has a venting port 40 extending outwardly therethrough from the box to a larger port 42 at its outer endand the venting is controlled by a ball valve 44 pressed against a valve corrugated board surrounding the chamber, the

wires extending along: the walls across the chamber and servingto aid in. the conducting-of heat therealong, thereby facilitatingthe maintenance of uniform temperature throughout the product and chamber. It will be apparent that aluminum foil, strips of foil or-like conductive metal oflight weight and high". conductivity can be em ployed. I

When the products to be shipped and the refrigerating unit have been placedin the container .tainer.

as illustrated, the top end is closed in the manner shown in Figs. 4 and 5. Two of the top end flaps it are first folded inwardly and the blanket extension I8 is then folded thereonto to provide. a complete top endinsulatio'n closure for the con.-

Finally, the two remaining: flaps l6 are folded onto the blanket insulation and taped along-their junction at 2'2.

It. Will now be apparent that Ihave provided a novel. and inexpensive shipping container for perishableproducts and a method of packaging such products and maintaining them at predetermined temperatre for substantial periods of time at minimum expense and minimum requirement of weight and space,.all of which makes possible the packaging and shipping of perishable products economically in containers which can be discarded after use. While my invention as herein described is especially useful for shipping via air, where the weight factor is of maximum importance, its use is not limited to any form of transportation and it canbe employed in various sizes and forms to suit the conditions presented. The invention has thus far been used very successfully in the shipment of such products as live and' cooked lobsters, fresh fish, orchids, fruit, frozen foods, etc. a

Having thus disclosed my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A shipping container 'for perishable products, comprising acorrugated paperboard carton having walls providinga storage chamber there-- an insulation jacket enclosing the box, means sup- "porting' the jacket and box on said walls at one end of the container, and means including a re lief valve for maintaining a predetermined temperature within thegwcontainerlby venting the closed box at a predetermined pressure, said venting means being the sole vent from the box.

2. The shipping container defined in claim 1 plus a flexible tube cooperating with said venting means for venting the box to the exterior of the container,

3. A shipping container for perishable products comprising a carton embodying two relatively spaced inner and outer walls of corrugated paperboard forming a storage chamber within the carton, a sheet of insulation material between the two walls and providing insulation about the chamber, a refrigerating unit comprising closed gas-tight box in the chamber and adapted to hold a block of dry ice, a paperboard insulation jacket enclosing the box and including flaps at its ends in positive engagement with and supporting the box on the inner wall, and means including a relief valve for venting the box at predetermined pressure.

4. A shipping container for perishable products, comprising a corrugated paperboard carton having walls providing a storage chamber there in, an insulation liner disposed adjacent to and over the walls about the chamber, a refrigerating unit comprising a closed gas-tight box in the chamber and adapted to hold a block of dry ice, an'insulation jacket enclosing the box, a rigid vent tube carried by and extending outwardly of the box, a spring pressed relief valve in the tube for maintaining a predetermined pressure in the box, a rigid vent tube carried by and ex tending outwardly through a wall of the carton, and a flexible tube connecting the rigid vent tubes within the carton.

5. A shipping container for perishable products, comprising a corrugated paperboard carton providing a storage chamber therein, an insulation liner associated with the carton about the chamber, a refrigerating unit comprising a closed sheet metal gas-tight box in the chamber, an insulation jacket in the box adapted to support a block of dry ice spaced from contact with the walls of the box, an insulation jacket enclosing the box, and means including a relief valve for venting the box at predetermined pressure.

6. A shipping container for perishable products, comprising a. carton embodying two relatively spaced inner and outer walls of corrugated paperboard forming a storage chamber within the inner wall, a continuous sheet of insulation material between the two walls, a waterproof bag in the chamber in close fitting contact with the inner wall, the bag being adapted to receive perishable products and to be closed at its top end, a refrigerating unit in the chamber adjacent to the bag comprising a closed gas-tight box insulated at its interior and exterior surfaces and adapted to hold a block of dry ice, means including a relief valve for venting the box at predetermined pressure, and foldable extensions on the top end of the insulation sheet and outer wall for closing the top end of the container.

7. The shipping container defined in claim 6 plus foldable extensions on the bottom end of the insulation sheet and outer wall for closing the bottom end of the container.

8. The shipping container defined in claim 6 in. which said insulation at the interior and exterior surfaces of the box comprises a corrugated paper product within the box for holding said block of dry ice and a. corrugated paper carton enclosing and closely conforming to the box.

9. A shipping container for perishable products, comprising a carton embodying two tubular walls in telescopic relation and each embodying four flat panels each pivotally attached along fold lines to the two adjacent panels, a tubular sheet of insulation material in telescopic relation with and disposed between the walls, the panels and sheet being movable about the fold lines from a flat collapsed relation to an open position in which the panels and sheet form a multiple-walled chambered carton, and foldable extensions on the ends of the sheet and outer wall for closing the ends of the container.

'10. A portable refrigerating unit for use in a shipping container, comprising a gas-tight box adapted to hold a block of dry ice, an insulating jacket completely surrounding and enclosing the box, an insulating jacket for enclosing the ice within the box, means including a relief valve for venting the box at predetermined pressure, said means being the sole vent from the box, and means carried by the first named jacket for engaging the shipping container and supporting the unit suspended therein above and spaced from the bottom wall.

11. A portable refrigerating unit for use in a shipping container, comprising a gas-tight box adapted to hold a block of dry ice, an insulating jacket completely surrounding and enclosing the box, a rigid vent tube carried by and extending outwardly of the box, and a spring pressed relief valve in the tube for maintaining a predetermined pressure in the box, said tube being the sole vent from the box, and a pair of oppositely disposed flaps carried by the jacket for engaging opposite side walls of the container and supporting the unit suspended in the container in spaced relation from its bottom wall.

GEORGE B. WAGNER.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 933,599 Teasdale Sept. 7, 1909 1,121,072 Corwin Dec. 15, 1914 1,198,792 Tracy Sept. 19, 1916 1,809,953 Witt June 16, 1931 1,825,068 Jones et a1 Sept. 29, 1931 1,975,177 Sherrick Oct. 2, 1934 1,986,263 Hatch Jan. 1, 1935 2,024,397 Snyder Dec. 17, 1935 2,058,757 Bangs Oct. 27, 1936 2,327,520 Hagstrom et a1. Aug. 24, 1943

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2728200 *May 1, 1953Dec 27, 1955Lobl FrederickRefrigerated shipping containers
US4845959 *Jun 27, 1988Jul 11, 1989Fort Valley State CollegeFruits and vegetables precooling, shipping and storage container
US5539956 *Sep 5, 1995Jul 30, 1996Temp Top Container Systems, Inc.Fingered latch for pallet-sized container
US5548972 *Nov 7, 1994Aug 27, 1996Temp Top Container Systems, Inc.Floating insulator top for pallet sized container
US5820268 *Jul 30, 1996Oct 13, 1998Jotan, Inc.Insulated container for packaging perishable goods
US6007467 *May 8, 1998Dec 28, 1999Eastern Seaboard Packaging, Inc.Method for forming an insulating inner container
US6080096 *May 8, 1998Jun 27, 2000Becker; John W.Method for packing perishable goods
US7140773Dec 22, 2005Nov 28, 2006Frontier Paper & Packaging, Inc.Method and apparatus for packaging perishable goods
US7624911 *Jun 29, 2005Dec 1, 2009International Paper Co.Container with freestanding insulating encapsulated cellulose-based substrate
WO2014057420A2 *Oct 8, 2013Apr 17, 2014Yara Praxair AsPackaging system for cooling of products
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/165, 62/371, 229/122.32, 229/103.11
International ClassificationB65D81/18
Cooperative ClassificationB65D81/18
European ClassificationB65D81/18