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Publication numberUS2534614 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 19, 1950
Filing dateJun 15, 1949
Priority dateJun 15, 1949
Publication numberUS 2534614 A, US 2534614A, US-A-2534614, US2534614 A, US2534614A
InventorsMichael Bernice M
Original AssigneeMichael Bernice M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Weaning cup
US 2534614 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 19, 1950 B. M. MICHAEL;

WEANING CUP Filed June 15, 1949 INVENTOR.

666N156 Mel/4a.

.4 r fA/EV Patented Dec. 19, 1950 UNITED STATES TENT OFFICE WEANING CUP Bernice M. Michael, Los Angeles, Calif.

Application June 15, 1949, Serial No. 99,251

Claims.

'1 This invention relates to a weaning cup and in one embodiment it provides a detachable cap which may be mounted on an ordinary tumbler or cup to convert it to a weaning cup.

posing pair of wedge-shaped outlet channels in an otherwise sealed vessel, the liquid contents of which vessel it is diificult to spill.

A further object is to provide a weaning cap of simple and durable construction, which is efficient in use and fabrication, and readily interchangeable from one drinkin container to another.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and claims, the novelty consisting in the features of construction, combination of parts, the unique relations of the members and the relative proportions, disposition, and operation thereof, all as more completely outlined herein and particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

In the drawings, which form part of the present specification:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of a weaning cup constructed according to my invention;

Figure 2 is an axial sectional view taken thru the cup along the line 2--2 of Figure 1;

Figure 3 is an axial sectional View thru a weaning cup wherein the cap is mounted outside rather than inside the cup; and

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the cap member with a portion broken away to show the internal construction.

The detachable cap or closure member I9 is here illustrated in association with a cup or tumbler l2 having an outwardly flared base M which may be additionally weighted to minimize accidental tipping of the vessel if desired. However, the cap can be used with conventional drinking vessels, it being preferable tho that both parts (cap and closure) be formed of organic plastic material so as to more readily fit together in non-leaking engagement. However, it can also be made of wood, metal, glass, etc.

As seen particularly in Figures 1 and 2, the cap II] is of generally cylindrical form with its side walls 16 having a slight, inwardly directed taper so as to be received within the side walls l8 of the cup or glass and thus be tightly, altho detach- 2 ably, wedged in place to seal the open top of the drinking cup.

Attwo diametric points along the edge of the cap there are formed drinking outlets 29, 22 here shown as several holes altho an elongated slot may serve the same purpose. The closed top of the cap is formed of downwardly converging walls 25, 26 descending from the drinking openings to the flat bottom 28 of a central recess 30 in the closure top. Each angular wall 24, 26 in conjunction with the adjacent side wall IIB thus defines a generally wedge-shaped channel 32, 34, the channel opening into the-interior of the tubular container l2 below and leading to the outlets 23, 22 above.

Accordingly, as the cup 12 is tipped to the one side or other, the liquid therein will run out one of the openings '26 or 22, the opposite opening serving as an air inlet. However, since the slant of the wall 24 or 26 corresponds roughly .to the shape of a nipple, a child will be led to place its month over such outlet 20 or 22. At the same time, the child will soon learn that it is necessary to tilt the cup rather than to suck on the openings in order to obtain the milk or other liquid. And while doing so, the recess 30 will accommodate the users nose within the cap, when the cup istipped. The two sets of openings 20, 22 may also be made difierent sizes as illustrated.

The intermediate side walls 36 of the top may be spaced apart from the outer wall l6 of the cap or not, as desired. Also, if desired, the outer wall may extend below the level of the recess bottom 28, so as to form a circumferential skirt 38 (Figure 3) which may be pressed around the outside of a cup l2a. It will be apparent accordingly, that the detachable cap can be made in different sizes to fit variously dimensioned tumblers or cups.

While I have shown and described in some detail a presently preferred embodiment of my weaning cup, it is understood that various modifications may be made in the construction and operation thereof within the spirit and scope of the subsequently claimed invention which it is my intention to claim broadly within the limitations imposed by the prior art.

I claim:

l. A weaning cup comprising a generally tubular container having an open top and an outwardly flared, closed bottom, and a tubular closure member having a closed, centrally recessed top and an open bottom, the side walls of the closure being adapted to be slid downward to frictional engagement with the side walls of the container, the upper edge of the closure being formed with a drinking outlet therethru, an air inlet therethrough and a downwardly diverging inner wall descending from the drinking outlet to the bottom of said recess and defining jointly with the adjacent side wall of the closure, a channel in open communication with the interior of the cup.

2. A weaning cup comprising a generally tubular container having an open top and closed bottom, and a tubular closure member having a closed, centrally recessed top and open bottom, the side walls of the closure being adapted to be slid downward to frictional engagement with the side walls of the container, the upper edge of the closure being formed with a drinking outlet therethru, an air inlet therethrough and a downwardly diverging inner wall descending from the drinking outlet to the bottom of said recess and defining jointly with the adjacent side wall of the closure, 2, channel in open communication with the interior of the cup.

3. A weaning cup cap of the character described comprising a tubular member having a closed recessed top and an open bottom, the side wall of said member being adapted to be slidably and removably mounted on a tubular cup, the upper edge of said member being formed with a, drinking outlet therethrough, an air inlet therethrough, and a downwardly diverging inner wall descending from said outlet to the bottom of said recess and defining jointly with the adjacent side wall of said member, a channel in open communication with the interior of the cup.

4. A weaning cup cap of the character de-' scribed comprising a tubular member having a closed recessed top and an open bottom, the side wall of said member being adapted to be slidably and removably mounted on a tubular cup, the upper edge of said member being formed with drinking outlets therethrough, downwardly converging inner walls descending from said outlets to the bottom of said recess and defining jointly with the adjacent side wall of said member, channels in open communication with the interior of the cup.

5. A weaning cup cap of the character described comprising a tubular member having a closed recessed top and an open bottom, the side wall of said member being adapted to be slidably and removably mounted on a tubular cup, the upper edge of said member being formed with a pair of diametrically opposed drinking outlets therethrough, downwardly converging inner walls descending from said outlets to the bottom of said recess and defining jointly with the adjacent side wall of said member, opposed channels in open communication with the interior of the cup.

BERNICE M. MICHAEL.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 517,673 Tracy Apr. 3, 1894 1,509,734 Langley Sept. 23, 1924 1,525,567 Cadby Feb. 10, 1925 2,093,133 Low Sept. 14, 1937 2,170,282 Van Der Spek Aug. 22, 1939 2,252,915 Conill Aug. 19, 1941 2,437,784 Laskin Mar. 16, 1948 2,447,870 Polcyn Aug. 24, 1948 2,493,633 Mart Jan. 3, 1950

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2600479 *Jul 10, 1950Jun 17, 1952Campomar JoseAttachment for drinking cups, glasses, and similar receptacles to prevent the spilling of liquids contained therein
US2608841 *Nov 16, 1950Sep 2, 1952Rice William WDrinking cup for use by infants and invalids such as chair and bedridden patients
US2623368 *Jul 13, 1950Dec 30, 1952Olsen Edward FSpillproof glass
US2753049 *Dec 10, 1951Jul 3, 1956Bernard GainesStrainer-protector for drinking vessels
US2765639 *Apr 2, 1953Oct 9, 1956Vestal Bryant EdmondBaby cup
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Classifications
U.S. Classification220/713, D07/511, D07/510, 604/78, 215/11.1, D07/523
International ClassificationA61J9/00, A47G19/22
Cooperative ClassificationA61J9/00, A47G19/2272
European ClassificationA47G19/22B12G, A61J9/00