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Publication numberUS2534702 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 19, 1950
Filing dateAug 14, 1946
Priority dateJul 23, 1945
Publication numberUS 2534702 A, US 2534702A, US-A-2534702, US2534702 A, US2534702A
InventorsMaximiliaan G Driessen
Original AssigneeDirectie Staatsmijnen Nl
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cyclone separator
US 2534702 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 19, 1950 M. s. DRIESSEN CYCLONE SEPARATOR Filed Aug. 14. 1946 4 3 7 M miltaan G-Dawe); M

MW 92.? W

past

-tlons I6 and I1.

Patented Dec. 19, 1950 CYCLONE SEPARATOB Maxlmiliaan G. Driesscn, Brunssum, Netherlands, assignor to De Directie van de Staatsmijnen in Limblu'g, Hecrlen, Netherlands Application Augustld, 1946, Serial No. 690,565 In Great Britain July 23, 1945 2 Claims.

This invention relates to cyclones used in concentrating or separating operations. Such a cyclone ordinarily comprises a cylindrical portion and a conical portion and means for delivering the material to be treated tangentially through an opening in the cylindrical portion. In the cyclone, rotating material in the vortex chamber spirals in an outer stratum toward the apex opening and discharges therethrough, and a hollow rotatin inner stratum moves toward and through an opening in the opposite end of the cyclone.

Among the objects of the present invention are to increase the efilciency of such apparatus by an improved proportioning and relationship of parts, and to provide for the ready replacement of certain parts which are especially subject to wear.

The invention is shown in illustrative embodiment in the accompanying drawing in which Figure 1 is an axial section or a cyclone,

Figure 2 is an axial section on a smaller scale of the apex end of a cyclone, showing a modification,

Figure 3 is a transverse section of an overflow hood, showing a modification, and

Figure 4 is an axial section of a cyclone chamber of modified form.

Referring to Figure 1, reference numeral Hl designates a short cylinder provided at its ends with outwardly extending flanges I I and I2, the cylinder being here shown as disposed on a vertical axis. Reference numeral I3 designates a tapered inlet pipe which debouches into the cylinder I8 through an opening I l, the pipe, as here shown. being inclined downwardly to the cylinder at an angle of about 5 to the horizontal.

Below the cylinder Ill is a cone generally designated at I5 and comprising upper and lower sec- Section I8 has at its large end an outwardly directed flange I8 bolted to the flange I2. The small end of section It is received and welded in an opening in a plate I9 perpendicular to the cone axis and adapted to support the cyclone on horizontal members and 2|. Gussets 22 and 28 are applied between plate I9 and the sides of section I8.

Section I! has a top flange 24 which is clamped against the lower end of section I8 by means of a clamping ring 25 and bolts 28 so that the inner surfaces of the sections are continuous with each other and are coaxial with the cylinder Ill.

The lower end of section I1 is received and welded in a ring 21 which is parallel to plate I9 and a terminal apex section 28 is clamped against the lower edge oi section Il through a clamping ring 88 and bolts 38, the lower end 01' portion 28 being received in an aperture of a plate 3| which is supported from ring 28 by means of a cage 82. As here shown, the interior surface of portion 28 is in smooth continuation of the interior surface of portion lI.

Pivoted beneath plate 3| on a vertical pin 32' is a table 33. The pin has a nut 34 threaded on its upper end for the support thereof and at its lower end has a flanged head 35 between which and the bottom of the table 33 is a compression spring 38 which holds the table against the bottom of plate 3. The downwardly projecting parts are in a tubular guard 31 fixed to the bottom of the table. The table is provided with a plurality of vertical openings 33' whose upper margins are rabbetted. and set in the openings are nozzles as at 38 and having upper out-turned flanges engaging the rabbets for the support of the nozzles, the nozzles being insertabie and removable through an opening ill in plate 3|. Nozzles 89 and 48 have vertical bores II and 42 of different diameter, the bores being surmounted by counter sinks 43 and 44 whose top diameter is the same as the diameter of the opening at the lower end of portion 28. By turning the table 33, the nozzles can be selectively positioned in alignment with portion 28 and in this manner the size of the apex opening is quickly changeable. Reference numeral 45 designates a hopper for the reception of the apex discharge.

Reference numeral 46 designates s, cylindrical overflow hood having an outwardly flanged lower edge 41 bolted to the flange II. The cylinder 46, as here shown, has the same diameter as the cylinder I8 and, in any event, the side wall of the hoodshould preferably lie within the axial projection of the cylinder ID for the sake of compact ness. Fixed in the bottom of the cylinder 46, as by welding, is a plate 48 which constitutes the top of the vortex chamber. Plate 48 has a central aperture in which is fixed a vertical tubular vortex finder 49 which extends above and below, or outwardly and inwardly of, the wall. The finder has a lower cylindrical bore 58 whose diameter is substantially the same as the diameter of the spout I3 where it first intersects the cylinder Hi, i. e. at the point I3, and these diameters are substantially between 5 and /5 of the internal diameter of the cylinder Ill. The finder has a lower external conical surface 5i which flares upwardly to the indicated weld fillet, thus eliminating the usual right angle wherein particles tend to collect. As here shown, the cylindrical bore 58 extends upwardly to the top of wall 48 and thereabove is comically outwardly flared.

asamoa Formed in the wall It is an outlet opening II whose lower edge is as close as possible to the top of plate 48. Reference numeral 54 designates a conduit projecting outwardly and downwardly from the opening. The top of the cylinder is closed by a wall 55 which has a. central inspection opening which is surrounded by a tube 8| fixed to and projecting downwardly from the wall coaxially with the finder and with the apex opening. The wall opening is closable by means of a plug I1. Reference numerals i8 and lit designate handles secured to wall it and by means of which cyclone may be lifted.

In a concentrating cyclone as shown, I have found that the best results are secured when the apex angle is between 15 and 25. The greatest wear in use occurs in the conical portion of the cyclone and it will be evident that any of the portions I5, I! and 28 may be readily removed for replacement. 1 have further found that a superior eil'ect is obtained when the diameter of the inlet opening is substantially the game as the diameter of the top outlet, 1. e., the bore ill, and when these diameters are substantially from 1%; to V5 of the diameter of the cylindrical portion. The flow through the finder is improved when its upper portion is outwardly flared as shown at 52, and there is a better circulation around the downwardly projecting portion of the finder when its outer surface is flared upwardly as shown at ii. The illustrated overflow hood is of advantageously small size. The eiiluent rising through the finder builds up and rotates against the side wall of the hood and is effectively disposed of through the side wall opening. As shown in Figure 3, this opening may be tangential in the direction of rotation of the eiiiuent in the hood.

Typical dimensions are as follows: height from top of hood to bottom of section II, 1060 mm.; height of hood chamber, 175 mm.; height of cylindrical receiving chamber, 100 mm.; height of section It, 347 mm.; height of section II, 390 mm.; diameter of cylindrical portions, 350 mm.; diameter of opening at lower end of section II, 80 mm. The diameter of the top outlet (bore 50) will be from about 35 mm. to about '70 mm.

In Figure 4, the tapered portion ii of the cyclone is shown as including separable sections it and I1 whose inner surfaces are convexed inwardly or toward each other, the curvature decreasing downwardly but preferably giving a mean angle of from about to 25. It will be evident that these curved sections can be substituted for the straight sections it and ll of Figure 1.

In Figure 2, the lower portion it of the section II" is made cylindrical and is provided at its lower end with an outward flange 6i having a bottom internal rabbett. Reference numeral 62 designates a conical portion having the same angle as portion ll" received in the cylindrical portion and terminating at the upper end thereof, the outer upper margin of portion 62 being beveled so that a. flush joint is provided. Portion 62 has a bottom flange 83 received in the rabbet of flange 6| and held by means of a flanged tubular fltting 6| bolted to the flange 8|. Also clamped between the flange l3 and the fitting is a, nozzle 85 whose inner surface, as here 7 4 vided with an aperture through which the male discharges.

It will be understood that the invention is susceptible of variations beyond those described and is not restricted in matters of the form and relation of parts except as in the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a cyclone, a vortex chamber including a relatively short cylindrical chamber portion and a relatively long tapered chambered portion, said portions being coaxial, the mean angle of taper of said tapered chamber portion being between 15 and 25, said tapered chamber portion being circular in transverse section and including a circular and central apex outlet, a tangential feed pipe debouching into said cylindrical chamber portion, the inlet mount of the feed pipe being flush with the inner surface of said cylindrical chamber portion. an end wall for said cylindrical chamber portion having a central outlet opening, a tubular member fitted in the outlet opening and extending from both sides of said end wall, but having its portion which extends into said cylindrical chamber portion terminate ad- Jacent the plane at which said tapered chamber portion joins said cylindrical chamber portion. the portion of said tubular member which lies within said cylindrical chamber portion having a bore of uniform diameter and of substantially the same cross-sectional area as the inlet mouth of said tangential feed pipe, and the exterior surface of said portion flaring outwardly from its terminal end to said end wall of said cylindrical chamber portion, the portion of said tubular member which lies beyond said end wall having a bore which flares outwardly away from said end wall.

2. In a cyclone. a vortex chamber including a relatively short cylindrical chamber portion and a relative long tapered chamber portion, said portions being coaxial, the mean angle of taper of said tapered chamber portion being between 15 and 25, said tapered chamber portion being circular in transverse section and including a circular and central apex outlet, a tangential feed pipe debouching into said cylindrical chamber portion, the inlet mouth of the feed pipe being flush with the inner surface of said cylindrical chamber portion, an end wall for said cylindrical chamber portion having a central outlet openins. a tubular member fitted in the outlet opening and extending from both sides of said end wall but having its portion which extends into said cylindrical chamber portion terminate short of said tapered chamber portion, the portion of said tubular member which lies within said cylindrical chamber portion having a bore of uniform diameter and of substantially the same cross-sectional area as the inlet mouth of said tangential feed pipe, and the exterior surface of said portion flaring outwardly from its free end to said end wall, the portion of said tubular member which lies beyond said end wall having a bore which flares outwardly away from said end wall, an

overflow hood beyond said end wall, said hood being cylindrical in transverse section and its peripheral wall being in continuation of the peripheral wall of the said cylindrical portion, and an outlet pipe extending tangentially from said hood and in a direction to directly receive material rotating in said hood.

MAXIMILIAAN G. DRIESSEN.

(References on following p 5 REFERENCES crmn Number The following references are of record in the 2349,83! file or this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS 5 Number Number Name Date 6-892 459,372 Morse Apr. 14, 1991 603 530,642 Hogeboom Dec. 11, 1994 43-249 1,959,628 Jacobson May 22, 1934 2,039,470 Keenan Mar. 10, 1936 10 48,918 2,085,506 McKeown June 29, 1991 57,996

6 Name Date Osgood May 30. 1944 FOREIGN PATENTS Country Date Great Britain Mar. 30, 1899 Great Britain Jan. 10, 1908 France Jan. 13, 1934 (1st Addition to No. 741.480) France June 21, 1938 Germany Feb. 9, 1890

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US450372 *Sep 2, 1887Apr 14, 1891 Orville m
US530642 *Sep 13, 1894Dec 11, 1894The Knickerbocker companyDust-collector
US1959628 *Aug 17, 1931May 22, 1934Jacobson Harry JFillet forming and applying device
US2033470 *Aug 30, 1933Mar 10, 1936Jabez Burns & Sons IncCyclone separator
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3505790 *Oct 31, 1966Apr 14, 1970Riley Stoker CorpDust collector
US4148723 *Mar 16, 1978Apr 10, 1979National Research Development CorporationCyclone separator
US4695299 *Feb 21, 1986Sep 22, 1987The United States Of America As Represented By The United States Department Of EnergyMethod and apparatus for in-cell vacuuming of radiologically contaminated materials
US5312466 *May 21, 1993May 17, 1994Alcatel CitPumping installation for pumping out an enclosure containing gases which are mixed with solid particles or which generate solid condensates or particles
US6027541 *Apr 8, 1998Feb 22, 2000Lee Valley Tools Ltd.Lid for auxiliary dust removal receptacle
US6210457Jun 7, 1999Apr 3, 2001Lee Valley Tools Ltd.Transparent lid for auxiliary dust removal receptacle
US6540918Jan 11, 2001Apr 1, 2003Odis Irrigation Equipment Ltd.Hydrocyclone separator
US7293657 *May 2, 2000Nov 13, 2007Krebs InternationalHydrocyclone and method for liquid-solid separation and classification
US8882892 *Feb 4, 2013Nov 11, 2014Nordson CorporationPowder coating system having powder recovery cyclone with hinged lower section
US20080212397 *Jun 29, 2006Sep 4, 2008Joel RondeauMethod and Apparatus to Optimize the Mixing Process
US20110235460 *Apr 11, 2011Sep 29, 2011Schlumberger Technology CorporationMethod and apparatus to optimize the mixing process
US20140216333 *Feb 4, 2013Aug 7, 2014Nordson CorporationPowder coating system having powder recovery cyclone with hinged lower section
US20160051994 *Apr 11, 2014Feb 25, 2016Shizuoka Plant Co., Ltd.Cyclone apparatus
WO2000003809A1 *Jul 13, 1999Jan 27, 2000Odis Irrigation Equipment Ltd.Hydrocyclone separator
Classifications
U.S. Classification55/460, 210/512.1, 209/732, 209/721, 55/428, 209/719
International ClassificationB04C5/081, B04C5/16, B04C5/02, B04C9/00, B04C5/12
Cooperative ClassificationB04C9/00, B04C5/02, B04C5/16, B04C5/081, B04C5/12
European ClassificationB04C5/081, B04C5/02, B04C5/16, B04C9/00, B04C5/12