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Publication numberUS2534808 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 19, 1950
Filing dateDec 7, 1948
Priority dateDec 7, 1948
Publication numberUS 2534808 A, US 2534808A, US-A-2534808, US2534808 A, US2534808A
InventorsBevington Jr Julius J, Eugene Boros
Original AssigneeB & R Mfg Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Suction cleaner
US 2534808 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Deco 399 1950 y J. J. BEVINGTON, JR., ET AL. 2,534,808

SUCTION CLEANER Filed Deo. 7, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet l JULIUS JBEVINGTUN JA.,

I IE' l" BY EUGENE Elmas.

ec. E9. 3.95 J. J. BEVINGTON, JR., ETAL 2534308 SUCTION CLEANER 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Dec. '7, 1948 INVENTORJ; JULJUS J BEI/mmm JH.,

EUEENE Ems/J5.

Patented Dec. 19, 1950 1;; 1-

t JuliusJ. Bevington, Jr., and Eugene Boros," To-I ledo, Ohio, assignors to The B & R Manufacturing Company, a partnership composed of J ulus J. Bevington'and Edward N.

both of Toledo, Ohio Rosenberg,

Application December 7, 1948, Serial No. 63,994

This invention relates to suction cleaners but particularly to cleaners of this type adapted especially, although not exclusively, for hand use. andwhich are capable of handling relatively dry air or moisture laden air.

- An object is to produce a cleaner of the above type which is capable eiliciently of drawing into a collecting chamber dirt laden air or'liquds and in the latter case, is adapted to render ineiective the suction producing means when a prefdetermined volume of liquid has been drawn into the collecting chamber.

Another object is to produce a suction cleaner capable of cleaning wet surfacessuch as floors, the liquid being delivered to a collecting chamber and the suction producing source being automatically rendered ineiective after a predetermined quantity of the liquid has been delivered to such chamber.

A further object is to produce a suction cleaner powered by an electric motor which is so shielded or isolated from the suction producing fan assembly as to militate against moisture or dirt particles in the air stream coming in contact with the motor and thereby causing injury or damage thereto.

A still further object is to producev a new and improved valve for a suction cleaner assembly which when a predetermined amount of liquid has been delivered to the collecting chamber, automatically shuts oil the air stream and after the collecting chamber is emptied of its contents, automatically moves to an operative position permitting resumption of the air stream.

A still further object is to produce a suction cleaner having the new and improved features of construction, arrangement and operation hereinafter described.

The illustrated embodiment of the invention is shown by way of illustration but not of limitation in the accompanying drawings, in which Figure l is a side elevation of the suction cleaner;

Figure 2 is a fragmentary top plan view of the suction cleaner, a portion being broken away to show the means by which theA air stream delivered to the collecting chamber is deflected;

Figure 3 is an enlarged vertical sectional elevation of the suction producing assembly and the valve assembly which depends into the collecting chamber; and

Figure 4 is a sectional elevation substantially on the line 4-4 of Figure 3.

The illustrated embodiment of the invention comprises an upright tubular casingv I0 which-is' 3 Claims. (C1. 18s-37) suitably mounted on caster wheels II to enable it readily to be moved from place to place.

Projecting outwardly from an intermediate portion of the casing I0 is a tube I2 to which a iiexible hose I3 is detachably connected by a suitable bayonet joint I 4. Connected to the outer end of the hose is -a tubular wand I5 which carries a floor tool I6 at its outer end, the latter being moved by the operator over the cor or other surface to be cleaned. -As will hereinafter appear. a negative pressure is generated within the casing III by a suction producing unit and a stream of air is caused to suck or draw dirt particles from the surface to be cleaned and discharge the same into a collecting chamber I1 on the inside of the casing Ill. It will also be understood that when the cleaner is used for cleaning of floors of buildings or the like, the water having a suitable detergent is iirst spread over the surface and in that event, the water or other liquid containing the dirt and foreign particles is drawn up through the floor tool,4 wand and flexible hose and discharged into the collecting chamber I1. As shown on Figure 2, a deliectng tube I8 communicates with the outside tube I2 and deects the air stream laterally to facilitate the discharge of dht particles, liquid or the like from the air stream into the collecting chamber I1. Fitting on the top or open mouth of the casing I0 is a cover C which carries the suction profducing unit. As shown, the cover has a downturned peripheral flange I9 which overlaps the side walls of the casing and interposed is a molded rubber gasket 20 which extends about the mouth of the casing II), the cover carrying a rubber sealing ring 2I which rests upon the rubber gasket 20.' This arrangement not only provides an effective fluid-tight seal but also provides a sound deadening cushion.

Integral with the flange I9 is a hand hold 22 to enable the tilting or lifting of the cover to afford access to the collectionI chamber I1. Integral with the cover ange I9 is a lateral ledge or wall 22 from the inner edge of which is an integr-al depending annular wall 23 and formed in the wall 23 is an inwardly extending shoulder 25 to receive a rubber-like annular ring 25 which is held 'from upward movement by a series cf metal clips 26. From the ledge 24 extends a cupshaped bottom wall 21. At one side of the cupshaped bottom wall 21 extends a tubular duct portion 28 which extends upwardly from thecup body portion 21 and terminates in a lateral exvtension 29 integrally joined tothe duct portion 28 and to the lateral wall portion 22.

3 In the bottom wall of the extension 29 is an annular opening into which extends a vertical tube 30, a screw 3| securing the tube 30 to the extension 29. The lower end of `the tube 38 extends into a tubular fitting 32, a screw 33 retaining the tube 30 and tting 32 in assembled relation. IAt the lower end of the fitting 33 is a downwardly facing valve seat 34, the purpose for which will be hereinafter described. Suitably secured to the outside of the fitting 32-and depending therefrom is a thin-walled tube 35, the lower end of which terminates a short distance above the bottom ofthe collectngnchamber |1 as shown in Figure l. suitably fixed to the inside of the tube at the'lowe'r end thereof is a stop rin-g 35. In the region of the fitting 32 and extending a substantial distancev therebelow is a series of perforations or air ports 31. sucient number and area of ports 31 being 'provided to enable a relatively free flow of air upwardly through Athe fitting 32 and tube 30 from the inside of the collecting chamber l1.

A's will hereinafter more fully be explained, a multi-fan arrangement creates a negative pressure to create a strearnof air from the floorv toolV I6 through the Wand I5, flexible tube |3 'andinto the collecting chamber |1 and thence through the `air ports 31 in the depending tube 35 and thence upwardly through the fitting 32, tube-39, into the extension 29 and thence doivnwa'rdlyv through the passage 28a` in the duct portion 28 and-into the cup-shaped or bowl-portion 21'. When the cleaner s -used for dry-cleaning, that is, to draw into the collecting charnber` l1 dust-laden air, the dust settles to the bottom of the lcollecting chamber from the stream of air. However; this machine is adapted for' use in wet cleaning, for example, where oors havebeen mopped with water or other liquid containing a detergent which frequently creates foam or suds. The negative pressure then causes the'liq'uid to be drawn into the collecting chamber |'1 and the suds or foam gathers on the top ofthe liquid.

I't is desired to render the suction-producing' unit ineffective after a predetermined level of liquid within the collecting chamber has been reached, and that preferably should take place before the level of the suds or foam on top of the liquid reaches the lowermost airports 31. For this purpose, a hemispherical valve 38, the diameter of which is slightly less than the insidediameter of the tube 35, is arranged within the tube with the dome-shaped portion facing'` upwardly. Suitably secured to the valve 38 and depending axially therefrom is a stem 33, the lower end of which is connected to a vertically elongate float 4|) which may be of any suitable material capable of floating on the surface of the liquid and thusmoving upwardly or downwardly .in accordance with the level of the liduid within the chamber |1. Manifesti?. when the valve 38 is lifted by the float 40 to a position that it bears against the valve seat 34, the stream of air through the collectingl chamber 1'Wi11 be cut olf and in this mannergrit will be manifest to the operator that the liquid should be emptied from the collecting chamber.

-The importance of spacing the sponge'rubber valve .38 from the oat is to enable the valve to cut-'olf the flow of air through the collecting chamberbefore the suds or foam on the top ofY the liquid entersthe lowermostair ports-31,. For this purpose, the-'spacing of the valvey 3|! from the float is predetermined in accordance with the depth of the foam ordinarily occurring in this connection. It will be manifest that the valve device above described positively militates against liquid as well as the foam or suds being carried upwardly through the tube 30 .andinto the bowl orcup21.

The suction producing unit is in the main supported by the annular rubber-like ring 25, thereby substantially obviating vibrational noises. A substantially bell-shaped electric motor housingv 4| has an annular flange 42 at the lower end which rests upon a flange 43 which has an annular outwardly-extending rim 44 which is embedded or fits into a notch in the rubber ring 25.

snugly in a recess' formed between` the .flange portions 42 and 43, and a boss 52- is; provided' centrally -of' the 'partition wall 5 l:4 A ingl'unit 53 is carriedbythe boss. 52 tdsup'port the armature shaft: 54. ofanzelectiic.motorfSS disposed within the bell housings". Aagptwking 56 is also carried by the boss':52"belowetnici-inea?v ing unit 53, .and f bears against: the mutex-:surface ofa. bushing 51.

Below-the partition-wall `5| -is a fan bladesunit 58 which is disposed above the vhorizontalfwall portion 446 anda fan blade unit 59whioli is dis= posed directly beneath thebottom wall Aportion 49. Each of the fan blades has la .liubwhich rare in abutting relation and are held ysecurelyagainst the bearing 51 by 'a nut '6G threaded onthe'lower end of the armature shaft 54.- Enclosirigrthe above described wall portionszis acuti-shaped sheet metal shroud 6| having a central aperture v 62 and a flanged upper endwhich is secured-in place by a series of screws 63 which 'also-.secure the flange portions 42 and 43. The'arrowson Figure-8 show the path of travelof the'airfstrearnV which, it will be observed, is circuitous or tortu'- ous, the air passing through the uppcr'portion of the depending wall 45 through aseries of slots-64 and into a space S5 which is formed by acylindrie cal shell 66 and a dome-shaped cover 61,- there being aseries of outlet .ports orvents 68 in' the cover 61. The cover 61 is lined with'suitable 'sound insulating material 69. The space or chamber has a top wall formed by a flanged shell.1|l which militates against the vented air passing upwardly and into the motor.

Also vcarriedby the armature shaftl 54 and vdis-i posed above the partitionwa-ll 5| isv a vfan-'1| which is designed tofdraw yair through openings 12 in the top of the casing 4| for ventilatingiand cooling the motor, such air passing from the motor through ports 13 and into a Ichamber-64 from which it passes-through apertnresw'.` el:es tending through the-shells 6 and le andtolthe outside through ports 16. from the outside passes to the motor Acasing inlet ports 12 through ports 11 in the .shell (i6 and a. niain inletpont' in the outer casing shell S1. i.

From the' above description itwill -be manifest that the fan blades 58 and y59,2serve todraw lair into the collecting chamberfll as above described and discharge the-'samerthrough-the :ponts 5 4 to.

the chamber 65 and to the outside through the port 68. None of this air is permitted to come in contact with the electric motor 55. On the other hand, the electric motor 55 is kept cool by a separate fan il, the air for which is handled entirely separately.

A manual switch iii is suitably provided in the cover shell 6i and is electrically connected in any suitable manner to the motor 55 as will be readily understood.

It is to be understood that numerous changes in details of construction, arrangement and operation may be effected without departing from the spirit of the invention especially as deiined in the appended claims.

What We claim is:

l. A suction cleaner comprising an upright receptacle, an inlet in the side walls of said receptacle through which either wet or dry dirt may pass into the receptacle, a. cover tightly tting the top of said receptacle and providing a closure therefor, said cover having side perforations, a suction producing unit carried by said cover, said suction unit comprising a housing, an electric motor within said housing, a partition wall carried by said housing, a motor shaft extending through said partition wall and bearing therein, suction producing fan means on said shaft disposed on the opposite side of said partition Wall, a laterally extending ange connected to said housing, fasteners connecting said housing to said ange, annular wall means forming a part of said cover, a rubber ring carried by said annular wall means and receiving the edge portion of said lateral flange, thereby resiliently to support said suction unit, means forming a part of said cover providing a passage from said receptacle to said suction unit, a shell interposed between said housing and cover, and means providing ports and passages to vent air from said suction producing fan means to the space between the shell and cover and thence to the outside through the cover perforations.

2. A suction cleaner comprising an upright receptacle, an inlet in the side walls of said recepu tacle through which either wet or dry dirt may pass into the receptacle, a cover tightly tting the top of said receptacle and providing a closure therefor, said cover having side perforations, a suction producing unit carried by said cover, said suction unit comprising a housing, an electric motor within said housing, a partition wall carried by said housing, a motor shaft extending through said partition wall and bearing therein, suction producing fan means on said shaft disposed on the opposite side of said partition wall, a laterally extending ange connected to said housing, fasteners connecting said housing to said ange. annular wall means forming a part of said cover, a rubber ring carried by said annular wall means and receiving the edge portion of said lateral ilange, thereby resiliently to support said suction unit, means forming a part of said cover providing a passage from said receptacle to said suction unit, a shell interposed loetween said housing and cover, and means providing ports and passages to vent air from said suctionk producing fan means to the space between the shell and cover and thence to the outside through the cover perforations, said air venting means including lateral slots in said ange enabling air from said suction producing fan means to pass therethrough to the space between the shell and cover.

3. A suction cleaner comprising an upright receptacle, an inlet in the side Walls of said receptacle through which either wet or dry dirt may pass into the receptacle, a cover tightly fitting the top of said receptacle and providing a closure therefor, said cover having a lateral exhaust vent, a suction producing unit carried by said cover, said suction unit comprising a housing, an electric motor within said housing, a partition wall closing the lower end of said housing, a motor shaft extending through said partition wall and bearing therein, suction producing fan means on said shaft disposed on the opposite side of said partition Wall, a laterally extending annular ilange connected to said housing, fasteners connecting said housing to said flange, annular wall means forming a part of said cover, a rubber ring interposed between said annular wall means and the edge portion of said lateral flange, thereby resiliently to support said suction unit, means associated with said cover providing a passage from said receptacle to said suction unit, a shell interposed between said housing and cover, and means providing ports and passages to vent air from said suction producing fan means to the space between the shell and cover and thence to the outside through the lateral exhaust vent.

JULIUS J. BEVINGTON, JR. EUGENE IBOROS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the iile of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 435,990 White Sept. 9, 1890 t192,083 Wright Feb. 21, 1893 1,049,729 Kaiser Jan. 7, 1913 1,423,190 Clements July 18, 1922 2,272,985 Smith Feb. 10, 1942 2,327,181 Dunbar Aug. 17, 1943

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2649927 *Jul 12, 1950Aug 25, 1953Mario De J OrtegaVacuum cleaning water separator
US2666498 *Mar 25, 1952Jan 19, 1954Clarke Sanding Machine CompanySuction cleaner
US2691424 *May 1, 1952Oct 12, 1954Houdaille Hershey CorpCombination air cleaner and intake silencer and mounting assembly therefor
US2731194 *Feb 2, 1953Jan 17, 1956Kent Moss AVacuum cleaner blower
US2824335 *Feb 17, 1955Feb 25, 1958Handling Devices Co IncMobile suction floor cleaner
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Classifications
U.S. Classification417/363, 417/423.2, 137/202, 96/406, 15/327.1, 55/472, 15/353, D32/23
International ClassificationA47L7/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47L7/0042, A47L7/0038, A47L7/0028
European ClassificationA47L7/00B8B, A47L7/00B10, A47L7/00B8F