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Publication numberUS2535682 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1950
Filing dateJan 2, 1947
Priority dateJan 2, 1947
Publication numberUS 2535682 A, US 2535682A, US-A-2535682, US2535682 A, US2535682A
InventorsJones Frederick M
Original AssigneeU S Thermo Control Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Prefabricated refrigerator construction
US 2535682 A
Images(9)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 26, 1950 F. M. JONES FREFABRICATED REFRIGERATOR CONSTRUCTION 9 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Jan. 2, 1947 INVENTOI? FREDERICK M. JONES W Flg. 3

F. M. JONES 2,535,682

Dec. 26, 1950 PREFABRICATED REFRIGERATOR CONSTRUCTION 9 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TOR.

FREDERKIK H. JONES 72 W42; 22'

Dec. 26, 1950 F. M. JONES 2,535,682

PREFABRICATED REFRIGERATOR CONSTRUCTION Filed Jan. 2, 1947 9 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVEHTOE FREDERICK M. Jones M *orney Dec. 26, 1950 F. M. JONES 2,535,682

PREFABRICATED REFRIGERATOR CONSTRUCTION Filed Jan. 2, 194'? 9 Sheets-Sheet 5 7 ,4,, INVENTOR.

M is/ 5 FREDERKZK M. JONES ATrorney Dec. 26, 1950 9 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Jan. 2, 1947 Fig. \9

o o o o o o o o o lot OKUO w o a c o o o o 0 L O O O O O o o o 8 w o o 0 w o p o A. 0 o 0 IN VE N 704? H w M Wm m Am Dec. 26, 1950 F. M. JONES 2,535,682

PREFABRICATED REFRIGERATOR CONSTRUCTION Filed Jan. 2, 1947 9 Sheets-Sheet 7 FREDERICK M. Jones Dec. 26, 1950 F. M. JONES 2,535,632

PREFABRICATE'D REFRIGERATOR CONSTRUCTION File d Jan. 2, 1947 9 Sheets-Sheet 8 we Fig. 27 \58 \ea \00 F 9' 28 172 INVENTOR. FREvEmcK M. JoNEs Dec. 26, 1950 F. M. JONES PREF'ABRICATED REFRIGERATOR CONSTRUCTION 9 Sheets-Sheet 9 Filed Jan. 2, 1947 INVENTOR. F EDER\CK M. JONES PvrTorn eg Patented Dec. 26, 1950 PREFABRICATED REFRIGERATOR CONSTRUCTION Frederick M. Jones, Minneapolis, Minn., assignor, by mesne assignments, to U. S. Thermo Control 00., Minneapolis, Minn., a corporation of Minnesota Application January 2, 1947, Serial No. 719,822

9 Claims.

My invention is related to an improvement in prefabricated refrigerator construction. In para ticular it is related to an improvement in a refrigerator which is formed of a plurality of prefabricated members that are adapted to be assembled into an enclosure at the place of useand which have been fabricated in such a manner as to provide superior insulating qualities.

The present invention is related to a form of refrigerator generally referred to as a. deep freeze unit which has gained popularity as a means for storing perishible foods in such a manner that they will retain the qualities of fresh foods over long periods of time. Units of this type are generally located in an out of the way place in the dwelling such as the basement, or some area remote from the kitchen, for the reason they are generally of considerable size and are not frequently used. Because of its bulky dimensions and weight, a certain amount of difficulty may be encountered in moving such a unit into the basement 01' other remote area of the dwelling in a pre-assembled condition. Under these conditions it is both desirable and economical to provide the construction in the form of a knock-down assembly which may be moved into the basement as a number of prefabricated integral units and assembled at the point where it will more or less permanently remain. In a knock-down assembly it is desirable that the several elements of the assembly be constructed and adapted for joining to the remainder of the elements in a simplified manner and yet maintain the greatest possible efficiency in the insulating qualities of the assembled refrigerator. For this reason the refrigerator is composed of a plurality of separable wall members or panels formed of reinforced insulating material which have been metalclad and constructed in a manner so that they may be easily joined to each other. When in use, the temperature within the refrigerator will be considerably below that existing externally to itswall members and, therefore, precautions must be taken to prevent the metalclad walls from acting as conductors of heat through the wall members at their areas of junction with each other. To accomplish this, each of the wall mem- 2 wood fastened to the lateral edges of another plywood strip forms a groove surface. The metalclad surfaces are formed in two pieces, one of which is intended to form the exterior surface, and the other the interior surface of the wall member. The two pieces of metal are separated from each other at the respective tongue and groove surfaces so that an area of low thermal transfer capacity in the fOIlll Of wood and plywood separate the two metal pieces to prevent a continuous flow of heat through the metal walls of any one member. The fastening means which join any one wall member to another, passes through the two members at the area of low thermal conductivity without contacting either of the opposed metal surfaces so as to prevent temperature transfer through the fastening means. Furthermore, in order to render the area of junction substantially air-tight, a pair of resilient gaskets is interposed between each pair of wall members adjacent the tongue and groove surfaces. In this manner the several internal metal surfaces of the refrigerator are completely isolated from the external metal surfaces and the areas of junction are all rendered substantially air-tight.

An object of my invention is to provide a prefabricated refrigerator formed of a number of elements which are adapted for assembly at the point of use.

Another object is to provide a refrigerator assembly consisting of a plurality of preformed metalclad wall members each of which has at least one surface of material having a low thermal transfer capacity co-operable with a similar surface of another wall member in such a manner as to preclude thermal transfer at the junction of the metalclad Wall members.

Another object is to provide a knock-clown refrigerator assembly having a plurality of prefabricated wall elements adapted to be joined to be joined to one another to form an enclosure which will be cooled on its interior, in which each of the wall members has a plurality of surfaces adapted to be joined to co-operating surfacesof other wall members in such a .manner as to preclude thermal transfer between the interior and exterior of the enclosure.

A further object is to provide a knock-down refrigerator assembly consisting of a plurality of wall members having co-operable tongue and groove surfaces, which members are adapted to be assembled into an enclosure by consecutively joining the several wall members to one another, together with a refrigerator unit consisting of a 3 plurality of heat exchanging shelves that are adapted to be mounted in the enclosure as it is nearing completion and connected to an exterior source of fluid refrigerant such as a compressor which may be positioned adjacent the assembly.

Other and further objects will beapparent from the following description and claims and from the several views of the invention in the appended drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevation of a. prefabricated refrigerator which forms the present invention with a part of the front wall broken away to show the interior construction;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation taken from the right side of Fig. 1 with portions broken away to show the interior construction;

Fig. 3 is a plan view of the refrigerator with portion of the top surface broken away; i

Fig. 4 is a plan view of the bottom of the as sembly as seen from beneath; I

Fig.- 5 is an enlarged exploded view of the assembly taken o'n the li iie's 5-5 of Fig. 1, omitting interior construction;

, Fig. 6 is n enlarged detailed view taken on the line 6- 6 of Fig. 3;

Fig. '7 is an enlarged detailed view of the construction shown on the lines l1 of Fig. 4;

Fig. 8' is an enlarged detailed view taken on the lines S8' of Fig. 2;

Fig; 9 is an enlarged detailed view taken on the Fig. 101s an enlarged top'plan view of the structure shown in Fig'. 4 as seen from the opposite surface;

Fig. 11 is an enlarged plan view of details of the'str'ucture shown in Fig.

Figs. 12-15 are detailed views taken onthe lines IZ IZ', i"3'l3,' |4'l 4, and |"5l5, of Fi 11.

Fig. 16 is a side'view of the base member of the structure, taken on the lines l6l6' of Fig. 10, with several parts" broken" away;

Fig. 1"? is a detailed view of fastening means shown in Figs. 12-15;

Fig. 18 is a plan view of the fastening means shown in Fig. 17 as seen from beneath;

Fig. 19 is a plan view of the interior surface of the top wall member;

Fig; 20' is an enlarged detail View of a part of the structure shown in Fig. 19;

Fig. 21 is a front elevation of the front panel of the'stru'ctu're shown in Fig. 1;

Figs. 22-25 are detailed views of construction shown" in- Fig. 21;

Fig. 26 is an enlarged view of a portion of the front panel of the structure shown in Fig. 1 with- General assembly Referring now to Figs. 1-4, general reference numeral- 53 indicates a prefabricated refrigerator assembly consisting of a base member 52; on which is mounted a front panel member 54, having a plurality of outwardly swinging door members 56 that are hingedly mounted on panel member 54 by hinges 58 and releasably latched to the front panel member by latched mechanism indicated by the general reference numeral 60. An indicating thermometer 1G is positioned through an aperture 72 the central portion of front panel member 54 for indicating the temperature within the interior of the refrigerator. Also mounted on base member 52 is a rear panel 14, a first end panel 16, and a second end panel 18. Mounted on top of the four panels which constitute the side Walls of the refrigerator is a cover member or top panel 80. The several walls or panels of the assembly are secured to one another and to the base member 52 in a manner to be described in detail hereinafter by a plurality of bolts 82-. Mounted within the enclosure are a plurality of heat exchanging shelves 84 which are supported on racks 85 and connected by conduits 86 and 88 to a pair if nipples 96 and 92 which are adapted to be connected to a refrigerant compressor (not shown) expansion valve 9"4 controls the new of the refrigerant fluid through the several heat exchanging shelves in such a manner that" shelves 84 will be rna'iritained at 'a desired temperature.

In order to secure the several panels in substantially air-tight relationship with each other and to prevent the transfer of heat from the outside to' the inside of the enclosure; the several wall members have been provided with a special con struction which will now be explained in detail.

The base member As best shown in Figs; I'd-I6, base member 52 is formed of a thick layer ofinsulating material'- lfiii? which may be spun glass or some similar substance having a low thermal-transfer capacity which is reinforced by a plurality of wooden cross-members N32 and a heavy metal channel supporting member I'M which extends about the ends of base member 52 in contact with insulating material W8. A pair of heavy channel beams are are located on the base member 52 for supporting member 52 in spaced: relationship with the floor. Positioned above insulation material Hi0 and in contact with the upper surface of supports I82 and 15 is a layer of plywood I08. Positioned on the exterior surfaces of base mem- 2.; her 52' is acontinuous layer of thin metal. H3.

A similar layer of metal H2 is positioned on the' upper or interior of the structure. Extending peripherally about the upper surface of member 52 with one surface in contact-with plywood I98 is a rectangularly shaped beam of wood He which may be formed infour pieces" and angularly joined at the corners of the structure as indicated by reference numeral H5 in Fig. 11. As clearly indicated in the several figures of the drawing; the exterior metal surface till is angularly bent about the outer edge of the wooden beam H4- and extends for only a short distance across the top' of beam H4: Similarly the interior metal surface H2 isalso angularly bent about the interior edge of woodenbeam H4 so that a clear space of wood indicated by general reference numeral HE is provided on the upper surface of wooden beam H-4 wh-ich separates metallic surfaces Hll' and H2. A continuous rubber gasket H8 having a" circular bead is mounted on metal surface H0 adjacent the exterior side of wooden beam lid to provide a sealing surface on the exterior of the structure and a similar gasket l20' is fastened to metal surface I i2 adjacent the in- -terior side of wooden beam H4 to provide a" sealing surface on the interior of the structure. Gaskets H8 and I are subject to a certain amount of stress and are therefore rigidly fastened by a plurality of fastening means. Alternately located on either side of beam H4 are a plurality of screws I22 which pass through gaskets H8 and I20, metal surfaces H0 and H2 and are threadedly secured in plywood I08. A plurality of fastening means I24 are alternately disposed on opposite sides of wood beam H4 for securing the outer metal surfaces III] and H2 in immovable relationship to plywood layer I08 and insulating material I00.

As best shown in Figs. 17 and 18, fastening means indicated by general reference numeral I24 consists of an adapter I25 having a pair of nails I26 that pass through adapter I25 and enter the under surface of plywood I08. Adapter I25 is provided with a central threaded aperture I21 which is adapted to threadedly engage a bolt I28 that passes through metalsurfaces H0 and H2, and plywood I08. driven through the metal surfaces H8 and H2, wooden beam H4 and plywood I 08 to rigidly secure the several members together.

By observing Fig. 10, it will be noted that a continuous surface of the nature just described extends about the upper surface of member 52 in such a manner as to form what is hereinafter described as a tongued surface indicated by general reference numeral I34. It is of particular importance that tongued surface I34 has a central area H6 formed of wood or other low thermal transfer capacity material, which clearly separates the metallic surface I I0 formed on the exterior of the member from the metallic surface II2 formed on the interior surface of the member, to thus prevent thermal transfer between the two metal surfaces.

Top member Referring now to Figs. 19 and 20, is shown the lower or interior surface of the top Wall member 88. As indicated in cross-section in Fig. 5, member 88 is provided with an interior mass of insulating material such as material I00 which is reinforced by a wooden cross-member I36. A layer of plywood I38 which is similar in all respects to plywood layer I08 of base member 52,

is located about the outer periphery of the lower wall member BI] and has its lateral edges bent, around the surface of the outer layer of WOOd I40 andterminating adjacent the exterior surface of plywood I38; Another sheet of metal I48 is positioned on the inner surface of wall member 80 with its lateral edges bent around the surface of the inner layer of wood I42 and also terminating adjacent plywood surface I38. A plurality of fastening means I24 are applied for securing metal surfaces I46 and I48 to wood layers I40 and I42.

It will now be apparent that top wall member 80 is provided with a continuous peripheral grooved surface I44 whose inner surface, formed of: exposed. plywood I68 or any similar material.

A plurality of nails I are:

having a low thermal transfer capacity provides;

a surface which will prevent heat transfer between metal surfaces I46 and I48, and also a surface which is adapted to receive a tongued surface of another wall member, which may be formed similar to tongued surface I34 of base member 52.

Front panel Referring now to Figs. 5 and 21-23, is shown the construction of the front panel or wall member 54. The panel has been constructed with four large openings I52 each of which is adapted to accommodate a door member 56. Wall member 54 has internally about its periphery four plywood strips I54 which are joined to each other adjacent their end portions. Extending vertically between the top and bottom plywood strips I 54 are two spaced supports I56 formed of plywood. At the outer lateral edges of the panel and positioned between plywood strips I54 and I56 are a plurality of wood blocks I60 to which the stationary portions of hinges 58 are adapted to bev secured. Extending between obliquely positioned center supports I58 are a pair of wood blocks I62 to which the stationary portions of latching device 60 are adapted to be secured. Also extending laterally between each pair of supports I56 and I58 are a plurality of cross-members I64 formed of wood, which define the upper and lower supports of openings I52. Each of the four internal surfaces of openings I52 is covered with a layer of wood I66 to which a layer of Bakelite I68 is fastened so as to provide a surface which is impervious to moisture and which can be maintained in a sanitary condition.

In the area surrounding the several openings I52 is located a quantity of insulating material I00 which is covered on the outside surface by a layer of metal I10 and on the inside surface by a layer of metal I12, that are of similar character to metal layers H0, H2, and I46, I48. The metal layers I10 and I12 are joined at the top and the two lateral edges to a tongued surface indicated by general reference numeral I14 as shown in Fig. 22, in identically the same man-' On its lower edge front panel 54 is formed into a grooved surface indicated by general reference numeral I18 as shownin Fig. 23, which surface is similar in character to grooved surface I44 of top panel member 80.

Door

As shown in Figs. 1, 5, 27 and 28, doors 56 are supported by hinges 58 on blocks I60 of front panel 54 to close the several openings: I52. A latching mechanism indicated by general reference numeral 60 which will be described in detail hereinafter is provided to maintain the door in a substantially air-tight fastness with front panel 54 when the door is closed.

As best seen in Figs. 27 and 28, door 56 is constituted of a mass of insulation I00 which is enclosed on its four edges by a layer of wood I18. As indicated in Figs. 5 and 27 the upper surface I and the lateral surface I82 adjacent the oblit luel-y faced support I58 are bevelled. The purpose of a bevelled surface I80 is to provide moisture drainage and the purpose of bevelled surface I82 is so that the door 56 will have an oblique surface co-operating with the oblique surface provided by member I58. Joined to each other about the lateral portions of the outer surface of the door are four strips of plywood I84. Encasing the outer surface of the door and bent around the edges of plywood I84 is a metal surface I86; Enc'asing the inner surface of the door and bent around wooden surfaces I18 is an other metal surface I88. Encircling the inner surface of plywood strips I84 is a layer of Bakelite I90 over which is mounted a continuous rubber gasket I92 having a beaded surface which is adapted to engage the outer metal surface I18 of front panel 54. Anothe layer of Bakelite I94 is positioned between gasket I92 and the wood surfaces I18.

hatching mechanism 60 consists of a member 6| fastened to door 56 by screws 62. A manually operable handle member 63 is pivotally mounted at 64 within member 6| and carries a pawl 65 that is adapted to engage a cleft portion 66 of stationary member 61 which is fastened to wood block I62 by screws 62 on front panel 54. Handle 63 also carries within member M a finger 68 that isada-ptedto move with relation to, an aperture 69 in member BI. A pin or look (not shown) is adapted to fit in aperture 69 to prevent movement of handle 63 so that door 56 may be locked in a closed position to prevent it being opened by unauthorized persons.

End panels Referring now to Figs. 29-32, are shownthe details of "construction of the end walls or panels I6 and 18, both of which are identical in form; A mass of insulating material I08 is formed with a central supporting member I36; On the lateral edges of their inner surfaces pan els I6 and I8 each carry two strips of plywood I98 to the edges of which are fastened narrow strips ofwood 288 to form grooved surfaces'indicated by general reference numeral 202 which are sun'- ilar to grooved surface I44 of top member 88; On their top edges panels 16 and I8 each have a layer of plywood 284 on which is mounted a wood beam 286 to form a tongued surface indicated by general reference numeral 288. On their lower edges each of the panels 16 and I8 carry a layer of plywood 2 I 8, which, with the aid of wood strips 2I-2 and 2M, forms a grooved surface indicated by general reference numeral 216, that is an angular continuation of grooved surfaces 282 on the inside surfaces of the panels. A layer of metal 2I8 is mounted on exterior surface of each of the panels and another layer of inetal- 2-28 is mounted on the interior surface of the panels and secured thereto by fastening means. These metal layersare secured with relation to tongued surface 288 and grooved surfaces 282 and 2I6 in the same manner as previously described in connection with metal layers H0, II2, I46, I48. A pair of rubber gaskets 222 and 224 which are similar to gaskets H3 and I26 are secured to metal surfaces 2I8 and 228 on either side of tongued surface 288.

It will now be apparent that end panels I6 and I8'each have one tongued surface 288 on the top edge, a grooved surface 2I6 on the bottom edge and two grooved surfaces 202 on its interior, face.

.' dicated by reference numeral 268.

Buck panel The back wall or panel member 14 is built in substantially the same dimensions as front panel 54. As seen in vertical cross 'section in Fig. 5. a mass of insulating material I is supported by means (not shown) between layers of plywood 226 and 228. A wooden beam 230 extends from the lower side of one edge over the top and down to the lower edge of the other side of the panel in contact with plywood layer 226 to form a tongued surface indicated by general reference numeral 232. On its lower edge a pair of wooden strips 234 and 236 are joined to plywood layer 228 to form grooved surface indicated by general reference numeral 238. An exterior metal surface 248 and an interior metal surface 242 are placed over the panel and joined to tongued surface 232 and grooved surface 238 in the same manner as has been previously described. A pair of rubber gaskets 244 and 246 are secured to metal surfaces 240 and 242 on either side of tongued sur-' faces 232 and from the lower side of one lateral edge over the top and down to the lower edge of the opposite side.

Fastening means As best seen in Figs. 6-9, are shown several views in which the several wall members are joined one to the other. Each of the severalwall or panel members which is to form anexterior surface is provided with an aperture 258 that extends entirely through the panel including either the tongued or the grooved Surface Whichever form of joining means the particular panel i provided with. Positioned between .the outer metal layer and the interior surface of the pl'y wood and extending through insulating material I08 is a tubular member 252 which is flanged on each end and which is fastened to the plywood layer by screws 2 53 as shown in Fig. 32 so as to provide abutment on one end with the metal surface and on the other end with the interior sun face of the plywood layer. The co -operating wall or panel member will also have an aperture 254 positioned in co-operating relationship with apex" ture 258. Positioned within insulating material I80 adjacent aperture 254 is a tubular construction indicated by the general reference numeral 256 and shown in detail in Figs. 24 and 25. Tubuflar structure 256 consists of a plate member 251 having a tubular extension 258 formed integral therewith which carries an interior thread on a thickened portion 259 and is pinched off as in Fastening means 256 is fastened to the surface of the plywood layer by co-op'erating screws and nut's 26I with the tubular portion 258 extending into in sulati'on I88. Bolt 82 having an exterior: washer 262 passes through tubular member 252 into" fastening means 256 Where the bolt threaded 1y joins the threaded portion 259.

It will be particularly noted that at each joint of a tongued surface and a grooved surface that bolt 82 passes through the junctionof the tongued and grooved surfaces in such a manner that it does not contact either the exterior or the in"- te'rior metal wall member and that it cannot, therefore, aid in thermal transfer between the exterior and the interior walls of the enclosure. a will further be noted that at the junction of each tongued andgrooved surface the junction is, for at least a substantial distance, a junction of wood, with plywood, which will preclude thefmal transfer and also will prevent moisture-frompenetrating into insulation material I at any point adjacent the junction.

Assembly In assembling the structure indicated by the general reference numeral 50 as may best be seen in Fig. 5, base member 52 is moved to the desired position. Thereafter back panel I4 is secured on the rear edge of base member 52 with grooved surfaces 238 in contact with tongued surface I34 and by means of a bolt 82 shown in the upper portion of Fig. 4 the two members are secured together with the portion of outer metal surface 240 which has been joined around wooden strip 234 in contact with gasket I I8 and the portion of metal surface 242 which has been joined around wooden strip 236 in contact with gasket I20. When these two members are joined, it will become apparent that the area IIB of tongued surface I34 co-operating with the plywood surface of grooved surface 238 will preclude thermal transfer between metal layers 240, 242 and H0, I I2. Thereafter end panel I6 is mounted on base member 52 and joined to back wall member I4 and base member 52 as shown in Figs. 6-9 with grooved surface 2 I in contact with tongued surface I34 and grooved surface 252 in contact with one of the lateral edges of tongued surface 232 on back panel member 14 and secured to base member 52 and back panel I4 by one bolt 82 passing through its lower edge and 2 bolts 82 passing through its lateral side as best shown in Fig. 32. Front panel 54 containing the assembled doors 55 is then fastened to the front side of base member 52 with its grooved surface I18 in contact with tongued surface I34 of base member 52 and one lateral edge of tongued surface I14 in contact with grooved surface 202 of end panel 16. Thereafter, the heat exchanging shelves 84 are slideably mounted on racks 85 between back panel I4 and front panel 54 and tubular connections 86 and B8 are connected to expansion valve 94 and to the plurality of heat exchanging shelves 84 and at their other ends tubular connections 86 and 88 are joined to nipples 9B and 92 that are in turn adapted to be connected to a refrigeration compressor (not shown). Thereafter end panel I8 is joined to base member 52 back panel I4 and front panel 54 in identically the same manner as end panel 16. Thereafter, top panel 80 is mounted on the assembly with its continuous grooved surface I44 in contact with tongued surface 258 of end panels and I8 and tongued surfaces 232 and I'M of back panel 14 and front panel 54 with the several layers of metal being separated by rubber gaskets 222, 224, 244, 246, and I15, I15 so that thermal transfer cannot occur between the several metal surfaces and the several surfaces are joined substantially air-tight.

The principal advantage of my invention is in providing a refrigerator construction formed of a pluraity of prefabricated elements which may be easily moved to the place of installation and readily assembled with one another in such a manner as to form a "knock-down construc-- tion. Another advantage is in the construction of a plurality of metalclad wall members adapted to be rigidly joined to each other wherein the junction areas of each member are formed of material having a low thermal transfer capacity, to preclude heat transfer through the metalcad walls. A further advantage is in the construction of an enclosure formed of a plurality of walls each of which has independent interior and exterior metal surfaces arranged so that none, of the .10 interior metal surfaces come into contact with the exterior metal surfaces to serve as a path for the conduction of heat between the exterior and the interior of the enclosure. A still further advantage is in the construction of a prefabricated enclosure which is substantially air-tight.

As it will be apparent to those skilled in the art, numerous changes may be made within the scope of the invention and therefore my invention is defined in the terms of the appended claims.

I claim:

l. A refrigerator assembly comprising in combination, a plurality of independent metal clad wall members having co-operating portions formed of material having a low thermal transfer capacity, means for insulatingly securing each of said wall members consecutively in engagement with another wall member in such a manner that they collectively form a sealed enclosure, a plurality of heat exchanging shelf members supported on said walls within said enclosure, and means carried by one of said wall members for connecting said heat exchanging shelf members with a source of fluid refrigerant, said several members each being constructed as an independ ent unitary element for knock-down assembly with the remainder of said members.

'2. A refrigerator assembly comprising, a plul'a ity of wall members, a tongued surface formed on one of said members, a grooved surface formed on another of said members cooperable with the tongued surface to form a junction between said members, one of said surfaces being formed of material having low thermal transfer capacity, fastening means passing through said members at the tongued and grooved surfaces for securing said members in rigid relationship with each other, and a resilient gasket carried by one of said members for engagement with the other member laterally adjacent said tongued and grooved surfaces in such a manner as to render the junction of said members substantially airtight when said fastening means is secured. I

3. An insulated cabinet embodying, a bottom wall member, a top wall member and four independent lateral wall members adapted for consecutive junction one with another, and with the top and bottom members to form a sealed enclosure, each of said wall members being composed of a substantially rectangular block of insulating material, a narrow strip of relatively hard material having a low thermal transfer capacity secured on an outer surface of each wall to form a junction surface for connecting said one wall member to another wall member, a first metal layer positioned on the outer surface of each of said wall members with one of its edges extending partially over one side of said strip, a second metal layer positioned on the inner surface of each of said wall members with one of its edges extending partially over the opposite side of said strip and terminating at a laterally spaced distance from the edge of the first layer to provide a remnant area On one side of said strip between the opposing edges of said metal layers at the junction surface, and fastenin means which pass through said wall members at the remnant areas of said strips for rigidly securing one wall member to another in such a manner as to minimize thermal transfer between the inner and outer layers at the junction areas.

4. In a refrigerator cabinet, a wall member formed of insulating material, a joining surface on said wall for uniting said one wall member to anoth r Wall memberfcomprising astrip of rela-.

ti-vely hard material having a low thermal transfor capacity engaging said insulation material and extending linearly along. an outer surface thereof, a pair of metallic layers superposed on opposite sides of said insulating material with one edge of each layer extending to said strip, the opposite edges of said two layers terminating in contact with one horizontal surface of said strip at spaced apart distances from each other in such a manner as to expose a portio of said strip between the layers to thereby form a remnant area of low thermal transfer capacity material on the joining surface, and fastening means for securing the edge of each metallic layer to said strip.

5. In a refrigerator cabinet, a wall member formed of insulating material, a strip of relatively hard material having a low thermal transfer capacity engaging said insulation material and extending linearly alon an outer surface thereof, a tongued surface formed on the outer side of said strip and adapted to cooperate with a grooved surface on another member to form a junction between said members, a pair of metallic layers superposed on opposite sides of said insulating material with one edge of each layer extending to said strip, the opposite edges of said two layers terminating in contact with the outer surface of said strip at spaced apart distances from each other in such a manner as to expose a portion of said strip between the edges of said layers to thereby form a remnant area of low thermal transfer capacit material on the joining surface, and fastening means for securing the edges of the metallic layers to said strip.

6. In a refrigerator cabinet, a wall member formed of insulating material, a strip of relatively hard material havin a low thermal transfer capacity engaging said insulating material and extending linearly along an outer surface thereof, said strip having two laterally separated portions on its outer surface to form a groove on the outer surface of said strip which is adapted to cooperate with a tongued surface or another wall member to form a junction between said wall members, a pair of metallic layers superposed on opposite sides on said insulating material with one edge of each layer extending to said strip, the opposite edges of said two layers terminating in contact with the outer surface of said strip at spaced apart distances from each other within the groove in such a manner as to expose a portion of said strip between the layers to thereby form a remnant area of low thermal transfer material along the grooved surface, and fastening means for securing the edges of said metallic layers t said strip.

7. In a refrigerator cabinet, in combination, a pair of wall members formed of insulating material, a tongued surface positioned on an outer surface of one of said members, a pair of metal layers positioned on opposite sides of said wall member with their opposing edges spaced from each other and in contact with laterally separated portions of the tongued surface, a second of said Wall members having a grooved surface formed on, one portion cooperable with the tongued surface on the first wall member to form a junction between said members, a pair of metallic layers positioned on opposite sides of said second member with their lateral edges space-d from each other and in contact with laterally separated portions of the grooved surface on said member, and fastening means passing 12 through said. members at. the tongued and grooved surfaces between the lateral edges of the metallic layers on each of said members whereby the fastening means is thermally independent of the metallic surfaces on. each. of said wall members.

8. In a refrigeration cabinet, 2. Wall member formed of insulating material, a strip of relatively hard material having a low thermal transfer capacit extending continuously in a linear manner along the outer surface of the insulating material, a pair of spaced apart members. positionedon the. outer face of one portion of said strip in such a manner as to form a grooved surface between said members, a. single member positioned on the central outer face of another portion of said strip in such a manner as to form a tongued surface, the tongued surface being disposed on a different portion of said, strip than the grooved surface, and a pair of metallic layers superposed on opposite sides of said insulating material with their edges terminating at spaced apart distances on the members forming the tongued and/or grooved surfaces. on said strip to provide a remnant area of low thermal transfer capacity along the center of said strip between said metallic layers.

9. A refrigerator cabinet, comprising a plurality of rectangular wall members, a linearly extending tongued surface formed on one face of one of said members, another of said members having a linearly surface formed on one face cooperable with the tongued surface on the other member to form a linearly extendin junction between said members, each of said surfaces being composed of material having a lower thermal transfer capacity, a pair of metallic layers disposed on opposite sides of each of'said wall members with their outer edges extending respectively to the tongued and grooved surfaces and terminating in the same plane at laterally spaced apart distances on one side of said surfaces to prevent thermal transfer from one layer to another through their opposing edges, a pair of resilient gaskets disposed on opposite sides of the tongued surface on one of said members for contacting the other member on either side of the grooved surface to render the junction substantially air-tight, and fastening means passing through said members at the tongued and grooved surfaces for securing said members in rigid relationship with each other.

FREDERICK M. JONES.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 1,321,097 Gonzalez Nov. 11, 1919 1,436,458 Raymond Nov. 21, 1922 1,520,409 Elmendorf Dec. 23, 1924 1,714,633 Scarlett May 28, 1929 1,869,812 Holbrook Aug. 2, 1932 1,892,708 Schwarz Jan. 3, 1933 1,940,655 Wallace et al Dec. 19, 1933 2,130,177 Ternstrom Nov. 14, 1939 2,217,222 Hall Oct. 8, 1940 2,259,185 Swedman Oct. 14, 1941 2,399,967 West et al May 7, 1946 FOREIGN PATENTS Number Country Date 210,522 Great Britain Feb. 1, 1924 321,568 GreatBritain Nov. 14, 1929

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2896271 *Jan 31, 1955Jul 28, 1959Haskelite Mfg CorpEnclosures for refrigerated areas
US3392497 *Oct 21, 1966Jul 16, 1968Delron Company IncModular enclosure with clamp joined panels
US3470705 *Nov 3, 1967Oct 7, 1969Henry J HallDomestic walk-in cooler
US4116510 *Mar 3, 1977Sep 26, 1978Gte Automatic Electric Laboratories IncorporatedChassis formed of sheet stock
US4917256 *Jul 12, 1988Apr 17, 1990Whirlpool CorporationInterlocking and sealing arrangement for modular domestic appliances
WO1998004876A1 *Jul 25, 1997Feb 5, 1998Miguel Eduardo Kuhn GoluboffCabinet kit for refrigerator and/or freezer
Classifications
U.S. Classification62/443, 220/592.11, 312/108, 312/138.1, 217/128, 62/298, 217/12.00R, 312/263
International ClassificationF25D23/06
Cooperative ClassificationF25D23/063
European ClassificationF25D23/06B1