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Publication numberUS2535835 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1950
Filing dateOct 30, 1946
Priority dateOct 30, 1946
Publication numberUS 2535835 A, US 2535835A, US-A-2535835, US2535835 A, US2535835A
InventorsBurgess Archibald R
Original AssigneeMarion L J Lambert
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Proportional flow valve
US 2535835 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A. R. BURGESS PROPORTIONAL FLOW VALVE Dec. 26, 1950 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 50, 1946 /Nl/EN7"O1Q v ARCHI'BALD R. BURGESS /97 TOR/vs v Dec. 26, 1950 A. R. BURGESS PROPORTIONAL FLOW VALVE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed 001. 30, 1946 FlG.iO.

ARCHIBALD R. BURGESS Patented Dec. 26, 1950 UNITED; STATES PATENT OFFICE mesne assignments to Marion L. J Lambert, doing business as Crystal-Flo Products Company, St. Louis, Mo.

Application October 30, 1946, ,SerialNo. 706,532

4 Claims.

This invention relates in general to certain new and useful improvements in beverage dispensing equipment and, more particularly, to;a so-called under-bar dispenser, that is to say, a dispenser adapted to be mounted directly upon the under side of a bar, shelf, or soda fountain counter.

It is the primary object of the present invention to provide an under-bar dispenser which is extremely compact in relation to its capacity and is relatively flat and shallow in the vertical-direction so that it can be easily mounted in restricted spaces and will not occupy very much space when so mounted.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an under-bar beverage dispenser which can b readily refilled with the syrup from which the beverage is made, and which can be readily dismantled for complete cleansing.

It is an additional object of the present invention to provide an undersbar dispensing valve capable of dispensing syrup and carbonated water simultaneously and in proper proportions tohmake a carbonated drink of proper strength and flavor.

It is also an object of the present invention to provide an under-bar dispenser and dispensing valv therefor, which are simple and economical in construction and are long-wearing anddurable.

And with the above and other objects in view, my invention resides in the novel features of form, construction, arrangement, and combination of less steel-and integrallyincluding a fiat rectanparts presently described and pointed out in the claims. t a

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure l is a perspective view of an under-bar dispenser constructed in accordance with and embodying the present invention installed beneath a bar-counter, the latter being broken away for purposes of simplicity in illustration;

Figure 2 is a bottom plan view of, the under-bar dispenser;

Figures 3 and 4 are, respectively, longitudinal and transverse sectional views taken along lines 3-3 and 4-4 of Figure 2; and

Figure 5 is an enlarged sectional view of the dispensing valve of the present invention taken along line 55 of Figure 2 showing the valve in closed position;

Figure 6 is a sectional view of valve in open position;

Figures 7 and Bare transversesectional views of the dispensing valve taken respectively, along lines l'! and 8-8 of Figure 5;

Figures 9 and 10 are detail sectional views of the dispensing valve taken, respectively, along lines it- 9 and lll lu of Figure 7;

the dispensing gular top section 21- rounded off along its front mar in, a at andlsmo thlv curvin into a short verticalfrontwall-orapron 4, the top sec: tion 2 and apronvd being; corherewise reinforced alongtheir auterfmarein bytriansu ar cornerplatesb marginally welded thereto. Along the rearward po tion of its longitudinal margins the top section 2 islprovided .with a plurality of spaced apertureslfi for re eiving screws; 1 bvwhich the cover-plate l is secfll'fidto thaunder side and with a portion a of its 'area projectin freely outwardly beyond the rearor. service-side edge bpf thebar -cou nter B. Qentrally of; the exposed. area a the topsection Z is provided with afilling aperture 8 which is covered by a removablewclosure element or, lid 9 formedpreferablyof Bakelite or other polymerized plastic material, all as best seen in Figure 1.

Adhesively, secureduppnthe under face of thetop section llisyalrectangular gasket I0 iiankedalong the-cuter cdgesof eachvof its longitudinal sides by a series of, suitably spaced depending bolts ll welded attheir upper ends to the under faceof the top section 2, for receiving wine-nu I S t b ep riu ed n h ld up upon each series of bolts ll by thawing-nuts 12 are urshaped channel members; l3, one rail of which projects under a broad flat rolled rim or flange l4 formed peripherally around the upper margin of a shallow rectangular; syrup pan l5, such rim being forced up'by, tightening of the wing-nuts 12, into tightly sealed engagement with the gasket [0. In itsbottomwall [5, the sy up pan I5 is providedwith a circular syrupdischarge aperture ll preferably located in concentric verticalalignmentwith the filling aper ture ,8 and interiorly covered by a circular gated-plate 18 having a depending marginal flange l9 provided with a plurality of slots or gates 20 through whichsyrup may run to the aperture I1. The plate 18 is also provided with three equally spaced counterg-sunk apertures 2| for receiving flat-headed attachment screws 22 whi e end th r t roue and th ou h b th h b t om wall Luanda circular, gas t 3. pon

the under face of the bottom wall l6 for threaded engagement in the upper end of the stainless steel cylindrical body 24 of a dispensing valve V having an angular end face 25 for seated engagement against the gasket 23 and so arranged that the valve V will extend forwardly and downwardly from the forward end of the pan l5, projecting, at its lower or discharge end, beyond the plane of the apron 4 in the clear so to speak, all as best seen in Figures 1 and 3.

Extendin lengthwise upwardly into the valve body 24 is a bore 26 terminating in a lateral offtake 27 which is internally threaded to receive a nipple 23 for disengageable connection by means of a fitting 29 to a carbonated water line 1. At its lower end the bore 26 opens upon the lower end face 36 of the valve body 24 and is internally threaded to receive a stationary, stainless steel nozzle-quill 3| which is conically faced-0E at its upper end in the provision of a valve seatforming face 32 and is internally flared for about thellower half of its length to provide a dischargepassage 33 having gradually increasing cross-sectional area. end-face, the nozzle-quill 3| is provided with a concentric deep groove 34 which is rounded at its top and bottom edges, as shown in Figure 10. Suitably fitted upon, and projecting downwardly from the nozzle-quill 3| is a shiftable nozzle 35 integrally provided at its upper end with a diagainst the seating face 32. It should be noted that the valve stem is provided with a plurality of axially extending flats, so to speak, to provide'ample annular clearance for the flow of liquid through the passage 33, as best seen in Figure 8. At its other end the valve stem 39 1S threadedly secured in a downwardly pointed concentric cone 42 formed preferably of Lucite and having greater angularity than the converging interior side walls of the nozzle 35 and being provided, at its upper end, with upwardly extending concentric rings 43, 44, for complemental disposition, respectively, within the groove 34 and tapered passage 33 of the quill 3|,

' as best seen in Figure 10. The cone is finally pinned to the nozzle 35 by a diametral pin 45 so that the nozzle 35, cone 42, stem 39, and washer 4| move together, and the entire assembly is normally held in downwardly shifted or closed position by a compression spring 46 disposed annularly around the quill 3| and the upper end of the nozzle 35 in endwise abutment on one end against the upper face of the collar 36 and on its other end against the lower end face 36 of the valvebody 24.

Extending lengthwise into the valve body 24 in spaced parallel relation to the'bore 26 is a second bore 41 opening at its upper end upon the 'upper end face in registration with the syrupdrainage aperture ll. About midway of the body-portion, the bore 4? is reduced in diametrical size in the provision of a shoulder 48 having a raised annular valve-seat 49. snugly fitted within the lower or reduced-size end of the bore 4'! for lengthwise shiftable but leakproof movement therein is a syrup-discharging spout 50 which is closed at its upper end by an end wall Finally, upon its lower 5| centrally bored and tapped for receiving a screw 52 adapted tosecure in place a diametrally enlarged disk 53 and washer 54, the latter being disposed within the enlarged upper end of the bore 41 for seated engagement against the valve-seat 49. Just below its closed end, the spout 50 is provided with a plurality of radially drilled orifices 55 through which syrup may flow for ultimate discharge from the lower or open end of the spout 59, and at its lower or discharge end the spout 50 is externally threaded for receiving an internally threaded set-collar 56 having a locking set screw 51. The spout 59 is normally held in downwardly shifted or closed position, with its associated washer 54 in seated engagement against the valve-seat 49, by a compression spring disposed annularly therearound and abuttingly engaged at one end against the upper face of the set-collar 56, and at its other end against the lower end face 39 of the valvebody 24.

Slidably mounted upon, and fitting annularly around, the lower end of the valve-body 24 is an actuator sleeve 58 having a skirt 59 projecting beyond the end of the valve-body 24 and being interiorly provided with an integral partition or transverse wall 60 suitably bored for fitting loosely around the nozzle 35 and spout 50, simultaneously bearing, upon its upper face against the under faces of the nozzle-collar 36 and setcollar 56. Adjacent its upper end, the sleeve 58 is provided with two diametrally opposite U-shaped apertures 6| having transverse fiat camming faces 62 for operative engagement with camming faces 63 of actuating studs 64 which are rotatably mounted in, and project radially from, the valve-body 24 through the apertures 6| and terminate in enlarged heads 65 which are, in turn, radially bored for snugly receiving the ends of a handle-clevis 66 centrally provided with an outwardly projecting handle 61 having a conventional knob 68 threaded upon its outer or'free end. The stud-heads 65 are, furthermore, axially bored and tapped to receive set screws 69 which project retentively into registering drill holes 10 in the retained ends of the handle-clevis 66.

In operation, the syrup pan |5 may be filled through the filling aperture 8 with a suitable flavoring syrup, such as, for example, Coca- Cola syrup, and as the handle 61 is swung either up or down the camming faces 62, 63 will co-act to drive the sleeve 58 upwardly whereupon the partition or wall 60 thereof, abutting against the collars 36, 56, will shift the valve-stem 39 and spout 56, and the associated washers 4|, 54, from the closed position shown in Figure 5 to the open position shown in Figure 6. When the valve V is in open position, syrup and carbonated water will flow simultaneously into the glass or other receptacle which is held therebeneath and a uniformly mixed beverage will thus be made. It should be noted that by reason of the shallow nature of the syrup pan I5 there will be relatively small variation in the hydrostatic headrof the syrup therein and thus, for all practical purposes, the syrup will flow from the opened spout 50 at a fairly constant rate. Furthermore, the carbonated water supplied through the water line I will flow under substantially constant pressure from any conventional source (not shown). The orifices 55 are of such size and position that the amount of syrup dispensed during any given time interval can be controlled by proper fitting of the collar 56. If,

for instance, the collar is threaded down so that it is relatively closer tofthe discharge end of the spout 50, the lifting action of the partition 60 will, in eifect, raise the orifices 55 completely above the valve seat-49. If, on the other hand, the collar is threaded upwardlyto a point somewhat further from the discharge end of the spout 50, the lifting eifect of the partition 60 will be reduced and the orifices 55: will be lifted only part-way above thevalve seat 49, thereby reducing the area exposed for admitting the flow of syrup and consequently reducing the amount of syrup delivered in a given time interval. By this means, the rate of flow of syrup can be proportioned in any desired manner to the rate of flow of carbonated water, thus forminga beverage of desired flavor strength. When desired, the nipple 28 and fitting 29can be disconnected and the wing-nuts I 2 loosened to permit complete removal of the pan I5 and its associated valve V for quick and convenient cleansing.

It should be understood that changes and modifications in the form, con truction, arrangement, and combination of the several parts of the beverage dispensing equipment may be made and substituted for those herein shown and described without departing from the nature and principle of my invention.

Having th s described my invention. what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. A valve for controlling the flow of fluids compri ing a valve-bod having a first passage extending longitudinally therethrough and being constricted intermediate its ends in the provision of a valve seat, a tubular spout slidably mounted in and pro ecting from one end of said first passage and being provided on its inner end with a closure element for valve-forming co-operation with the valve seat, spring means for normally urging the spout outwardly with respect to the valve-body and bringing the closure element into seated engagement with the valve seat, said valve-body having a second passage extending therethrough, a tubular member mounted in and projecting from one end of said second passage and being provided at its inner end with a valve seat, a stem mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for co-operation with the valve seat, a discharge nozzle slidably mounted on and projecting downwardly from the tubular member and being connected to the stem for movement therewith, an abutment on the spout, an abutment on the discharge nozzle, and means engageable with the abutments for simultaneously lifting the spout, stem, and the associated closure element and poppet for opening both of said passages and permitting the flow of fluids therethrough.

2. A valve for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a valve-body having a first passage extending longitudinally therethrough and being constricted intermediate its ends in the provision of a valve seat, a tubular spout slidably mounted in and projecting from one end of said first passage and being provided on its inner end with a closure element for valve-forming cooperation with the valve seat, spring means for normally urging the spout outwardly with respect to the valve-body and bringing the closure element into seated engagement with the valve seat, said valve-body having a second passage extending therethrough, a tubular member mounted in and projecting from one end of said second passage and being provided at its inner end with a valve seat,a steml mountedtin and extending through saidttubular: member, a valve poppet fixed uponthe upper end of :said stern for co-operation with the valve. seat, :a :discharge nozzle slidably mounted on and projecting downwardly from the tubular .member: and beingconnected to thestem for movementtherewithran abutment on thespout, an abutment on the discharge nozzle, a tubular sleeve: slidably mounted upon the lower end face'ofthe valvebody, a transverse partition rigidly mounted in the sleeve and apertured. for loosely clearing the spout and nozzle and engaging the abutments, andhandle means forshiftinglthe-sleeve upwardly in relation to the valve-body for simul taneously lifting the spout, stem; and the associatedclosure element andpoppet for opening both of said passages and permitting the flow of fluids therethrough. l

3. A valve for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a valve-body having upper and lower end faces and a longitudinally extending first passage opening at its opposite ends upon said upper and lower end faces, said passage being constricted intermediate its ends in the provision of a valve seat, a tubular spout slidably mounted in, and projecting from, one end of said first passage, said spout being provided on its inner end with a closure element for valve-forming co-operation with the valve seat, spring means for normally urging the spout outwardly with respect to the valve-body and bringing the closure element into seated engagement with the valve seat, said valve-body having a second passage opening at its lower end upon the lower face of the valve-body and at its upper end upon a side face of the valve-body, a tubular member mounted in and projecting from the lower end of said second passage and being provided at its upper end with a valve seat forming end face, a stem loosely and shiftably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for cooperation with the seat forming end face, a discharge nozzle slidably mounted on and projecting downwardly from the tubular member and being connected to the stem for movement therewith, an abutment collar on the spout, an abutment collar on the discharge nozzle, and means operably mounted on the valve-body for engagement with the abutment collars for simultaneously lifting the spout, stem, and the associated closure element and poppet for opening both of said passages and permitting the flow of fluids therethrough.

4. A valve for controlling the flow of fluids comprising a cylindrical valve-body having upper and lower end faces and a longit dinally extending first passage opening at its opposite ends upon said upper and lower end faces, said passage being constricted intermediate its ends in the provision of a valve seat, a tubular spout slidably mounted in one end of said first passage and proiecting inwardly therein beyond the constriction, said spout being provided on such inwardly projecting end with a closure element for valve-forming co-operation with the valve seat, spring means for normally urging the spout outwardly with respect to the valve-body and bringing the closure element into seated engagement with the valve seat. said valve-body having a second passage opening at its lower end upon the lower face of the valve-body and at its upper end upon a side face of the valve-body, a tubular member mounted in and projecting from the lower end of said second passage and being provided at its upper end with a valve seat forming end face, a stem loosely and shiftably mounted in and extending through said tubular member, a valve poppet fixed upon the upper end of said stem for co-operation with the seat forming end face, a discharge nozzle slidably mounted on and projecting downwardly from the tubular member and being connected to the stem for movement therewith, an abutment collar on the spout, an abutment collar on the discharge nozzle, a tubular sleeve slidably. mounted upon the lower end of and projecting beyond the lower end face of the valve-body, a transverse partitition rigidly mounted in the sleeve and apertured for loosely clearing the spout and nozzle and engaging the abutment means thereon, and handle means for shifting the sleeve upwardly in relation to the valve-body for simultaneously 8. lifting the spout, stem, and the associated closure element and poppet for opening both of said passages and permitting the flow of fluids therethrough.

ARCHIBALD R. BURGESS.

REFERENCES CITED The following references are of record in the file of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 671,307 Clark Apr. 2, 1901 923,447 Schmidt June 1, 1909 1,144,890 Calvert June 29, 1915 1,619,278 Travis Mar. 1, 1927 2,016,583 Weightman Oct. 8, 1935 2,275,703 Trester et a1. Mar. 10, 1942

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US671307 *Feb 4, 1899Apr 2, 1901Jacob HausslingSoda-water-dispensing fountain.
US923447 *Aug 15, 1908Jun 1, 1909George A SchmidtToilet-soap-dispensing attachment for washstands.
US1144890 *Aug 10, 1908Jun 29, 1915 Sylvania
US1619278 *Aug 6, 1926Mar 1, 1927Travis John MBeverage-dispensing apparatus
US2016583 *Mar 31, 1934Oct 8, 1935Gaskell & Chambers LtdMeasuring tap
US2275703 *Dec 2, 1940Mar 10, 1942Trester Carl PDispensing container
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2673007 *Jul 17, 1951Mar 23, 1954Clement Debrie Andre Victor LeRemovable pumping tank for automatic developing machines
US2934243 *May 7, 1958Apr 26, 1960Stanley Knight CorpDispensing apparatus
US3195566 *Mar 8, 1962Jul 20, 1965Cornelius CoReadily disassembled valve
US5058768 *Nov 13, 1990Oct 22, 1991Fountain Technologies, Inc.Methods and apparatus for dispensing plural fluids in a precise proportion
US5388725 *Nov 24, 1993Feb 14, 1995Fountain Fresh InternationalFluid-driven apparatus for dispensing plural fluids in a precise proportion
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/595, 222/129.1, 222/129, 251/155, 222/181.3
International ClassificationB67D1/00, F16K31/44, F16K31/58
Cooperative ClassificationF16K31/58, B67D1/0082
European ClassificationF16K31/58, B67D1/00H8B