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Publication numberUS2535965 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 26, 1950
Filing dateSep 14, 1948
Priority dateSep 14, 1948
Publication numberUS 2535965 A, US 2535965A, US-A-2535965, US2535965 A, US2535965A
InventorsSutton Boyee T, Sutton James C
Original AssigneeSutton Boyee T, Sutton James C
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Powder applicator for printing machines
US 2535965 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 26, 1950 J. c. SUTTON ETAL t ,2,535,965

POWDER PPLICAIDRr FOR PRINTING MACHINES Filed Sept. 14, 1948 2 Sheets-Sheet l IN V EN T 0R)` 7.44155 c'. sufra/v mvo BY orcf 7.' .farro/v A TTORIYEJS De@ 26, 1950 J. c. sUTToN EVAL APPLICATR FR PRINTING MACHINES Filed sept. 14, 1948 2 Sheets-Shee-'c 2 .rwlwsi INVENTORS .r/wfs c .farro/v No BY @aref I sufro/v @Mayan/,6M

Patented Dec. 26, 1950 OFFICE POWDER APPLICATOR FOR PRINTING MACHINES James C. Sutton and Boyce T. Sutton,

Lyman,

Application September 14, 1948, Serial No. 49,214

3 Claims.

This invention relates to printing machines, and more particularly to an applicator adapted to spray powder across the face of the endless blanket used in a textile printing machine or other similar printing machines.

In the modern textile printing machine, powder is applied to the endless printing blanket at the powder dryer assembly after it leaves the washing station and before it passes to the printing station. The use of powder in this way serves two useful purposes. The powder drys the face of the blanket Eby absorbing any water particles remaining thereon after it has been washed, thus preventing running of the colors due to the presence of excess moisture in the subsequent printing operation. Also, the powder absorbs excess colors during the printing operation, thereby minimizing the discoloration of the blanket and facilitating the removal of excess colors therefrom during the washing operation.

The applicator customarily used in the powder dryer assembly of these machines consists of a gravity feed hopper containing a supply of powder, such as talc, and a series of brushes for spreading the talc across the face of the blanket and for removing any excess talc therefrom. One of the problems encountered in applying talc in this manner is that it is not distributed uniformly over the face of the blanket. Also, in the type of applicator heretofore used, it is very diiiicult to control effectively the amount of talc which is applied.

In accordance with this invention, a, simple applicator is provided for using air under pressure to spray powder, such as talc, across the face of I.,

the printing blanket. The arrangement of the applicator in this manner obviates the diiculties heretofore encountered by affording an excellent uniformity of distribution of powder over the face of the blanket and an eifective control of the amount of powder applied. Thus, the use of an excessive quantity of powder is eliminated, with resulting economy, and an adequate quantity of powder is constantly sprayed on the blanket to absorb the excess moisture and colors thereon, with increased efciency of operation.

Briefly described, this device comprises a hopper containing a supply of powder such as talc, conduit means connected to the hopper and arranged with a perforated portion of the conduit means adjacent to the printing blanket, and means positioned in the hopper for delivering air under pressure so that the talc is forced by the air pressure from the hopper into the conduit means and sprayed through the perforated portion of the conduit means across the face of the blanket.

The invention is described more in detail below in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation view of the powder dryer assembly of a textile printing machine;

Fig. 2 is a corresponding sectional view taken substantially on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the powder applicator taken substantially on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged sectional view of the regulating valve portion of the hopper on the line 4wd of Fig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a corresponding sectional view on line 5-5 of Fig. 4; and

Fig. 6 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation of the conduit means in the form of a tubular pipe illustrating the arrangement of the periorations in that portion of its structure adjacent to the printing blanket.

Referring at first to Figs. l and 2 of the drawing, the disposition and arrangement of a powder applicator Il) arranged in accordance with the present invention are shown in relation to the powder dryer assembly II of a textile printing machine.

The powder dryer assembly II comprises the assembly frame I2, rolls I3, I4, and I5 which are mounted on the assembly frame I2, rotary brush IB, suitably mounted on the assembly frame I2 for rotation by a pulley arrangement with roll i4 and for lateral adjustment by set screw Il, and the powder applicator I0.

In the operation of the powder dryer assembly II, the printing blanket I8, after leavingV the washing station (not shown) passes through, the powder dryer assembly II on rolls I3, Ill, and It. In the passage of the printing blanket It from roll I4 to roll I5, the face I9 of the printing blanket I3 is cleaned by rotary brush I t; then, the face I9 of the printing blanket I8 has powder 20 sprayed thereon by the powder applicator I0. After being sprayed with the powder 20, the printing blanket I8 passes over the roll I5 to the printing station (not shown) of the textile printing machine.. ,Y

The form and arrangement of the powder applicator IB are illustrated more in detail in Figs. 3, 4, 5, and 6 of the drawing. As shown, the powder applicator IIJ comprises a hopper 2 I, conduit means 22, and means for delivering air under pressure to the conduit means 22.

The hopper 2 I, as shown, is cylindrically shaped, tapers toward the bottom, and contains agitating arms 23, feed propellers and a powder regulating valve 2li. The regulating valve 2e comprises an annular stationary web 26 formed with sector shaped openings an annular movable web 23 formed with sector shaped blades 22 and connected to the stationary web 2@ at a central ivot point 2t, a bolt Si attached to the end of one oi blades and extending through a slot 32 in the side of the hop-per 2 i, and a locking nut 33 mounted on the extending end of the bolt Si. As shown in Fig. e, the movement of the bolt 3| in the slot 32 rotates the movable web 23 so that the annular position oi the sector shaped blades 2S determine the clearance afforded by the sector shaped openings 2l. is soon as the desired amount of powder is passing through the engages the side of the hopper thereby locking the movable web 26 in xed relation to the stationary web 2li. The agitating arms 23 and feed propellers are rotated in the hopper 2i by the motor 6d, mounted on the assembly Yfrantic i2, with a pulley arrangement the wheel on the motor shaft and the wheel on the shaft 3S, mounted on the hopper i, transmitting the necessary power through the gear The conduit means 22 ni y taire any convenient form for receiving the powder forced by air pressure from the hopper 2i and or spraying the powder 20 uniformly over the face of the printing blanket i6; as shown, the conduit means 22 comprises a tubular pipe arrangement having perorations dii spaced in that portion of its structure adjacent to the printing blanket lil, This tubular pipe arrangement is connected to the hopper 2i' at the end 3i which is formed with a Venturi shaped throat ft2 for receiving air under pressure from the nozzle of the air compressor pipe lili, and is closed at the other extending end The means for delivering air under pressure to the conduit means 22 comprises a pipe L35 from an air compressor (not shown) a magnetic cut-on and cut-oil valve (it for controlling the delivery of the compressed air, and a nozzle i3 positioned in the base of the hopper 2i so that ,air under pressure is delivered directly into the center oi' the Venturi shaped throat L32 of the conduit means 22.

The cooperating action of the agitating arms 23 and feed propellers 2 with the proper setting of the regulating valve 25 provides a measured quantity of powder Ztl to the base of the hopper 2i. During the operation of the textile printing ma.- chine a constant stream of compressed air is forced through the pipe and out ci the nozzle 43 positioned in the base of the hopper 2i so that the powder 26 is forced by the air pressure from the base of the hopper 2i through the Venturi shaped throat i2 and out of the conduit means 22 through the peroraticns .lit

Since the conduit means 22 is disposed across the face i6 of the printing blanket it with that portion of its structure containing the perforations d@ adjacent to the printing blanket i3, the face i9 of the printing blanket iii is sprayed constantly by a measured quantity of powder 26.

We claim:

1. A powder applicator for applying talc to a printing blanket in a textile printing machine comprising a perforated, elongated conduit having an open Venturi shaped throat at one end, means for supplying talc to said Venturi shaped throat, a tubular nozzle connected to a source of compressed air and disposed in the center of said Venturi shaped throat whereby compressed air is delivered into said Venturi shaped throat and said talc is forced into said conduit and through the perforations onto said blanket.

2. In a textile printing machine having a printing blanket, a powder applicator comprising powder supply means, a perforated, elongated conduit disposed in spaced relation transversely of the blanket of said machine, said conduit having an open Venturi shaped throat in one end, said Venturi shaped end being connected to said supply means, said conduit being closed at the other extending end and having a plurality of perforations spaced in that portion of its structure adjacent to said blanket, a tubular nozzle connected to a source of compressed air and positioned in said supply means with the end of nozzle being disposed in the center of said Venturi shaped throat iv-hereby compressed air is delivered into said Venturi shaped throat forcing said powder into said conduit and through said perorations across the face of said blanket.

3. In a textile printing machine having a printing blanket, a powder applicator comprising a hopper lferne for storing a supply of powder, said hopper having agitating and regulating means for controlling the flow of powder to the base or" said hopper', a perforated, elongated conduit disposed in spaced relation transversely of the blanket 0.? said machine and formed with a plurality of per orations in that portion of its structure adjacent to said blanket, said conduit having an open Venturi shaped throat in one end, said open end being connected to the pase of said hopper, said conduit being closed at the other extending end, and a tubular nozzle connected to a source of compressed air and positioned in the base or said hopper in spaced relation to said Venturi shaped throat for delivering air under pressure to said Venturi shaped throat whereby compressed air is delivered into said Venturi shaped throat forcing said powder into said conduit and through said perforations across the face of said blanket.

JAMES C. SUTTON. BOYCE T. SUTTON.

REFERENCES CITED The following reierences are of record in the ille of this patent:

UNITED STATES PATENTS Number Name Date 825,381 Coleman July 10, 1,906 1,333,079 Kaufmann May 9, 1920 2,006,757 Bostrom et al July 2, 1935 2,261,212 Bergh Nov. 4, 194,1 2,266,849 Cole Dec. 23, 1941 ,2,375,766 Britcher May 15, 1945

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US825381 *Oct 9, 1903Jul 10, 1906George D ColemanApparatus for mingling finely-divided solid substances with a blast of air.
US1333079 *Oct 9, 1918Mar 9, 1920Fownes Brothers & CoPowder-distributer
US2006757 *Aug 2, 1933Jul 2, 1935Arthur E BostromApparatus for coloring flour
US2261212 *Dec 16, 1938Nov 4, 1941Theodore J BereghSpraying device
US2266849 *Aug 9, 1938Dec 23, 1941Cole HerbertDry spray for preventing offset
US2375766 *Jun 26, 1943May 15, 1945Craig CorpDry spray equipment
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US5561950 *Mar 30, 1994Oct 8, 1996Collins; Ted R.Capable of adjusting the height of a structural member
Classifications
U.S. Classification118/612, 118/308, 406/128, 118/325
International ClassificationB41F17/00, B41F35/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41F35/007, B41F17/003
European ClassificationB41F17/00E, B41F35/00F